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Thread: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine


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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Con O'Sullivan View Post
    Following on from a thought prompted by my friend Trow who is an expert tracker through the symbols and signals that light up our culture I thought it might be interesting to put forward a thread for discussion of who we are and why we are as we are in the modern world.

    I contend that this cannot be done by a mere accountancy as we have attempted to do in recent years. Nor can it be done by self-flattery through our history. Nor even by looking for a reflection of ourselves in the mirrors of our neighbours, or treaties, contracts with other nations and almost certainly not by reading the public statements of our leaders. Their concern is to homogenise us as the electorate at home and 'the Irish people' when they are abroad- both being pliable and biddable concepts for the politician.

    They say Freud alleged that the Irish were the only people one could not analyse. I doubt he did say that but if he did it was probably because he relied so much upon sex for diagnosis and he died before sex began in Ireland with the advent of the Late, Late Show.

    So what are we left with but the things that make us peculiar and distinctive in the eyes of other people. These things we might not notice so much as they are by definition familiar to us and too close in to us to be thought about often. Our warinesses and superstitions. The way we use language, our own and adopted. The symbols that survive and that we all recognise and end up having to explain to American tourists.

    Some psychologists say that there is a duality in the Irish psychology which is striking.

    'we now turn our attention to the deep cultural importance of the underworld in Irish psychology. While stories of fairies, leprechauns and banshees may serve to instil fear in Irish children nowadays, they are vessels of a deeper culture.xi There is an intense dichotomy between the earth and the underworld.

    The above-mentioned Book of Invasions tells of the Tuath De Danaan (the People of Danuxii), who were the occupiers of Ireland when the Milesians first came. According to the story, the Tuath De Danaan were driven underground where they continued to reside in ‘sidhe’ or fairy mounds and play an influential role in manipulating events in the world above.

    This dualism with its attendant sense of dominant/recessive elements is reflected in many areas of Irish life. The Tuath de Dannan represent the magical, recessive component in the equation.'

    Jonathan Korowicz, Institute for Integrative Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding, Vienna, Austria http://www.iicp.at/communications/pu...%20Ireland.pdf

    Mr Korowicz also points out; 'What is interesting here is the idea that the concept of place and not people is emphasized in defining Irishness. The Irish citizen in mythic terms feels himself to be part of a process i.e. one of many races in the same land.vii However, each race tends to overcome, obscure or dominate the previous race. Irishness is thus an experience combining concepts of destiny, suffering, sacrifice and exile/separation. This final component is evident both in the Leabhair Gabhala where the invading tribes are themselves exiles from other lands as well as in the 19th and 20th Centuries where exile is perpetrated on the Irish race for reasons of survival (the Great Famineviii) and psychological reasons (as in the writings of James Joyce – ‘the quintessential exiled writer of the twentieth century, who obsessively relates to his past by distancing himself from it’.ix) '

    I found this paper on a google search and wished to use it to prompt a discussion of Irish psychology if possible and what symbols from our mythology and folklore might indicate. There is the above and the below- this world and the underworld and that is ancient in our culture.

    I myself refer to 'Tir Na N'og' Ireland whenever I feel we are responding to the theory of things and not the reality- the assumed separation of powers in the pillars of the state, the notion that abortion does not occur in Ireland because it takes place in the 'otherworld' beyond the departure gates and not at home. Tir Na N'og never feels more real to me when I detect this reaching for the theoretical by Irish opinion-formers- the pretence around the Celtic Tiger and the false economy of the boom being a kind of migration into fantasy and a bridge into the never-never land.

    I have questions I'd love to hear answers on or at least opinions from other Irish people.

    Do we undervalue our folklore and mythology and not recognise them as symbols of a language between us to which many of us have lost the key?

    Are psychologists and historians right to pay so much attention to cultural symbols in order to describe traits in the Irish psychology?
    "This is one race of people for whom psychoanalysis is of no use whatsoever." Sigmund Freud, speaking about the Irish. That implies there's others like us lol

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Con O'Sullivan View Post
    I notice the practice of psychology in Ireland is in a fairly fledgling stage and gathered around such activity hubs as child learning and development, autism and matters under the aegis of the Dept of Health and Children- then we have strands such as employment psychology with assessments and motivational work etc, psychology as an academic subject and other attendant areas such as sports psychology and so on.

    Naturally this emerging profession in Ireland will organise itself around certain pillars of activity. But I wonder whether it will be persuaded towards an annual exercise in assessment of a sample of the population in order to draw some conclusions as measured against population based research elsewhere.

    No disrespect to the psychology professionals in Ireland of whom there are too few and who rely via their national association on membership subscriptions alone and I am aware of the constraints on them by funding but I would dearly like to see some kind of measurement of the population against known and accepted psychological tools. It would in fact help to promote their profession and the advantages of assessement by experts of perceptions in society and I note that their annual report goes into some detail on efforts to promote the benefits the profession brings to the nation.

    There is very little in the way of reflection on the population and its perceptions available I think which allows assumptions to be made. We do have Schools of Psychology at Trinity, UCD and Maynooth as well as other university settings and I would love to see this profession advertise itself a little more by issuing some kind of 'national perceptions' report once a year perhaps in the summer months of the political silly season which would serve two purposes- it would meet the needs of the profession in advertising the benefits of such assessment and it would capture the media attention to the possibility of wider research- it wouldn't have to be necessarily agonising soul searching stuff but could be arranged to produce some eyecatching and even novel, entertaining facts about social perceptions in Ireland without becoming twee to the level of mawkish pop psychology.

    Because we have had remarkably little in the way of psychological assessment via survey beyond defined categories such as disability,trauma, and whatever the meme of the university day happens to be we are left to argument between the rangers of the psychological world- writers, poets, dramatists to hold up a mirror to the national personality. This is fine but we should have something to measure perception and perhaps delusion against. Logical, rational society marches in formation as shaped by the landscape it advances through but the writers and poets range to the sides and ahead of the column and often return with intelligence that is later corroborated or discarded by the general staff.

    We need more trained perception specialists to work with the cultural rangers to gain better intelligence on how to move through the landscape ahead.
    I hope you take it as a compliment but would you ever consider going back to college yerself to become a Psychoananalyist or a philosophor with these issues in mind? You'd certainly add some creativity and passion.

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Con O'Sullivan View Post
    Sometimes, very rarely, too rarely, you see something that lifts your heart and gives you a bit of hope

    Take a look at the Occupy Waterford agenda/manifesto http://www.facebook.com/pages/Occupy...type=1&theater

    Take a look at the 'What we demand for the future' where it makes reference to 'we demand a court system acting under a natural system of law which mirrors the Brehon system of our ancestors' among the other demands of the 99% as elucidated by the Occupy Waterford team.

    Jesus I could kiss them.
    ye mean jaysus lol

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Con O'Sullivan View Post
    Thats a great point fluffy- Irish humour. It can be very dark alright. Don't want to go off on too much of a tangent as I can gas for Corrib on the subject but Beckett had that down like a surgeon. So did Brien O'Nolan/Flann.

    Peculiarly enough I think a writer who has suffered somewhat from the slings and arrows of outrageous legal fortune and is condemned by the insufferably politically correct is JP Dunleavy who I think had a beautiful way of revealing the Irish humour in both adversity and off the pig's back. I'm thinking of Darcy Dancer or Beasty Beatitudes of Balthazar B- anyway- enough of book musing.

    We are known though for a definite strain of humour and a liking for the slightly absurd- I recall reading somewhere that the definition of a classic comedy situation was where a central character was trapped in some definable way- Basil Fawlty in the Torquay hotel where he definitely didn't want to be ... Ronnie Barker's 'Fletcher' actually physically trapped in jail, Del Boy and Rodders trapped in financial exile in Peckham ... Fr Ted trapped with a moron and a collection of lunatics on Craggy Island and so on.

    Sense of humour and an examination of the distinctly Irish sense of humour might be a great way to track the national psychology alright.
    Well I might but in here a chara I got sick of being stuck in Dijon for 2 months straight and nobody would travel with me, despite having many friends from all backgrounds, they couldn't manage a good ***** in that regard-actually organizing things. One english mate said he didnt plan things and that he'd like to just take off some day soon traveling. I actually did that this past week. Took an aul TGV to Switzerland where I stayed rural for 4 days-saw Murten, Fribourg, passed through Lausanne which is nice but too big for me, and spent a day in the lovely Neuchatel later regretting I didnt take a boat across its lake(left it too late).

    Before I left Dijon I met the same English lad at the bus stop and we got the bus into the town centre from campus. He seemed pretty disappointed I was taking off, but I knew he-like all me other english friends here- wouldnt have the get up and go to just do it. I really dont plan things he remarked on the bus. Then he asked howd I get about Switzerland-I said Id hitch hike.

    4 days later on the train home he sent me a panicked text wondering where I was saying everyone was up in arms and worried bout me cos I hadnt Facebooked in that time. When I got back everyone thought I was missing after hitchhiking and was all relieved. The same English lad had told everyone I was thumbing it. It was a wind up lol. For me, that sums up dark humour: the unconerned laid back Irish wind up culture. PJ Gallagher highlighted this well in recent times, unlike the other crap ye see on the idiot box like delemere or Byrne.

    BTW liking of the slightly bizarre might come from the 'Jam on yer egg' saying. Everyone stares at me in our communal kitchens here cos I eat Jam with everything at every meal. Whistling is also something I frequently do and its impolite apparently unless you have music on in many countries, I still feiceann do it though.

    Hope that provides some insight to how these things might apply when outside of Ireland. I'd be interested in some of your own tales re. travel and intercultural experiences. This will be a very wide ranging thread and Im glad you started it. Gotta go now. Noisy neighbours are better to be partied with than spited.

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Quote Originally Posted by Apjp View Post
    I hope you take it as a compliment but would you ever consider going back to college yerself to become a Psychoananalyist or a philosophor with these issues in mind? You'd certainly add some creativity and passion.
    Very nice of you to say so, APJP, but I'd rather stick with the 'rangers' being more naturally a bit of a loner and outlier I would say. Besides I cannot stand classrooms or lecture halls and find the presence of other people distracting. I prefer to read things myself although I hear the Open University is now offering shorter courses with no attendance at night classes so thats been on my mind. A bit of a quare hawk but I get frustrated by the presentation and just want to say 'gimme the books' and go off in a corner and I'll puzzle it out.

    I know enough to know that the psychological profession cannot or maybe will not see the Irish woods for the social trees- I think there are only a couple of hundred psychologists in the country, properly accredited, and they are in no mood to start telling home truths about certain vested interests in case they upset too many people.

    Part of the recovery in the national psyche from centuries of colonialism of the mind and of the physical surroundings will come with patient psychological work. I'm not sure with psychology in Ireland whether I'm pleased with them around or angry that they aren't talking as a profession. They need to start talking and helping to explain the national mindset. The way life is though that isn't a big earner and is likely in Ireland to draw down vilification from the remaining regiment of the Tir Na N'og.
    Think National. Act Local. Oh- and superstition is just the dark matter of human history.

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Con O'Sullivan View Post
    Great point there CF... it may be that we have become so used to hiding what defines us culturally beneath a veneer of assumed 'modernity' that there is an automatic unhappiness in it.
    Overt noisy official "welcome" behind which, unofficially, is a very closed family home. Droppers in and overstayers much feared and loathed.

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Yes- a good example. Most people in Ireland think they the show of hospitality is just a case of not wanting to cause offence and being a bit timid but I think culturally the instinct for hospitality is part of the cultural conditioning from time immemorial when it was against the law to refuse hospitality and could damage your name.

    There are tales aplenty of American tourists out in the west searching for family connections making the wrong connection and landing on a bemused old couple- the old couple being as hospitable as they can and never saying a word that they know the tourist is wrong in the family connections.

    I've heard of this myself where an old couple were hugely polite and hospitable to an American chap who mistakenly thought they were distantly related and he stayed with them at their invitation for a couple of days and it was only when he did a thorough check of geneological records he realised that the old couple must have known he wasn't a relative and never said a word all the time he was there.

    People nowadays might assume thats just being too polite but there are instincts at play there which have nothing to do with timidity but some cultural sound or remnant unwilling to risk the 'good name'.

    A pity I can't explain these things better but if one accepts there is anything to the link between the mind and the body and therefore the psychology of individuals all living to the same cultural conditioning it is possible via a process of 'knowing' how to respond in certain ways by instinct in certain situations handed down over many generations and influenced by culture.

    there is some emerging science to this- roughly it correlates to behaviour or physiological response handed down in the chemistry of evolution and surprisingly there are indications that minor adjustments take place not only over many generations but in shorter spans- from grandfather to grandson or even mother to daughter. 'Epigenetics' is an area that caught my eye in New Scientist some years back where there is a study of why alcoholism for example seems to run in families- if one accepts readily enough that physiology is determined by inherited genes then is it possible a certain trace of psychology is too? The mind cannot be separated from the body nor the body from affecting the mind.

    Anyway- i'm wandering.
    Think National. Act Local. Oh- and superstition is just the dark matter of human history.

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Con O'Sullivan View Post
    Very nice of you to say so, APJP, but I'd rather stick with the 'rangers' being more naturally a bit of a loner and outlier I would say. Besides I cannot stand classrooms or lecture halls and find the presence of other people distracting. I prefer to read things myself although I hear the Open University is now offering shorter courses with no attendance at night classes so thats been on my mind. A bit of a quare hawk but I get frustrated by the presentation and just want to say 'gimme the books' and go off in a corner and I'll puzzle it out.

    I know enough to know that the psychological profession cannot or maybe will not see the Irish woods for the social trees- I think there are only a couple of hundred psychologists in the country, properly accredited, and they are in no mood to start telling home truths about certain vested interests in case they upset too many people.

    Part of the recovery in the national psyche from centuries of colonialism of the mind and of the physical surroundings will come with patient psychological work. I'm not sure with psychology in Ireland whether I'm pleased with them around or angry that they aren't talking as a profession. They need to start talking and helping to explain the national mindset. The way life is though that isn't a big earner and is likely in Ireland to draw down vilification from the remaining regiment of the Tir Na N'og.
    Another great post. I am sure there are some fine individual or very small numbered evening courses that would suit you. I know the feeling that you describe-particularly when more than 10 people are in a class. I think the Irish mentality was far less colonial when we were a physically occupied nation. Just look back a few decades when the North was occupied by Tens of thousands of British soldiers and there wasnt even a regional democracy. There was a very popular anti colonial/pro civil rights response to that Fascist occupation for about 10-15 years before it turned really badly and civilians on both sides suffered. I would have supported the IRA until they started killing civilians, and I am pretty sure many others actually did at that time. I believe the South is the colonialised section of the country. The North acts more rebellious and political than any of us ever did. Because many of them had to.

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    One thing I've always wondered about Ireland and our culture is the extent of our links with abroad, how it influenced language and culture. To give a couple of examples, some foreign friends of mine asked me to give them a blast of the oul cupla focail to have a hear of it, they were of the opinion that it sounded similar to Arabic. Another example is sean-nos singing, which some people suggest bears a great resemblance to folk music of North Africa.

    One thing we tend to forget is just how cosmopolitan Ireland really was. Our native language has been influenced by diverse foreign tongues from Latin and Norse to English, the Gaelic world which we were the epicentre of encompassed most of Scotland and Man and on top of this the Gaels strongly influenced the Norse in Faroe and Iceland. That's before we even mention the fact that Dublin was founded as a Norse kingdom, Ulster was colonised by the Scots in the 13th and 14th centuries, Galway and Limerick are Norman cities, that Wexford and Fingal had their own unique languages (Yola and Fingalian, both very similar to Anglo-Saxon Old English) and that French was spoken in Waterford during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. Just an interesting thought, what lasting effect did the successive waves and the fresh blood bring to the character of the country?
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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    That is true, Anti, and the old fecundity symbols of the female figure are remarkably similar in both North Africa and from Ireland. I think it is only relatively recently that there has been a move to reevaluate the sea lanes around Ireland and with the continent because they would have been the motorways of their time.

    We are trained in some ways to assume an eastward to westward migration across Europe in the early days certainly and to look at land routes automatically when we think of travel- but then the Romans who were never really a maritime power could still transport armies and send emissaries by sea back almost two thousand years ago.

    Down the west coast of Ireland when the language was Irish- no English to speak of before the 16th century the trading language among merchants was Latin for exchange with the merchants of Portugal and Spain. Some of the early maps (Heroditus?) show Spain and Ireland as pretty much on the same latitude and that can only really be a reflection of the mapmakers understanding of common trade routes. Certainly the first English explorers to penetrate to the west coast of Ireland found to their surprise that the Irish nobles wore swords from Toledo and responded not to attempts to communicate in English but responded very well in the trading language of Latin.

    When you consider Latin as a trading language it is worth remembering also that a number of Roman emperors were African from that province of the Empire. Rome itself took over from ancient Greece as the balancing power to Egypt and in fact turned Egypt into a province of Rome in the end so one end of the Empire to the fringes in the west where the Empire would have traded via its Spanish province along Atlantic sea routes with lands as far as Ireland and beyond to Scandinavia is no great stretch.

    I believe there were people described as 'celts' from middle Europe and from Briton and Wales in Rome as part of the legions so when you think of Rome as the first great globalised trading bloc across all of Europe the lines are there for some communication, trade and of course arcane knowledge to pass from Egypt to Connacht and from the Norse halls down to North Africa.

    The Vikings certainly traded for southern Empire goods and travelled to the Med I think records indicate.

    Who knows what knowledge, maps, and cultural symbols crossed and merged with that kind of trading reach?
    Think National. Act Local. Oh- and superstition is just the dark matter of human history.

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Con O'Sullivan View Post
    That is true, Anti, and the old fecundity symbols of the female figure are remarkably similar in both North Africa and from Ireland. I think it is only relatively recently that there has been a move to reevaluate the sea lanes around Ireland and with the continent because they would have been the motorways of their time.

    We are trained in some ways to assume an eastward to westward migration across Europe in the early days certainly and to look at land routes automatically when we think of travel- but then the Romans who were never really a maritime power could still transport armies and send emissaries by sea back almost two thousand years ago.

    Down the west coast of Ireland when the language was Irish- no English to speak of before the 16th century the trading language among merchants was Latin for exchange with the merchants of Portugal and Spain. Some of the early maps (Heroditus?) show Spain and Ireland as pretty much on the same latitude and that can only really be a reflection of the mapmakers understanding of common trade routes. Certainly the first English explorers to penetrate to the west coast of Ireland found to their surprise that the Irish nobles wore swords from Toledo and responded not to attempts to communicate in English but responded very well in the trading language of Latin.

    When you consider Latin as a trading language it is worth remembering also that a number of Roman emperors were African from that province of the Empire. Rome itself took over from ancient Greece as the balancing power to Egypt and in fact turned Egypt into a province of Rome in the end so one end of the Empire to the fringes in the west where the Empire would have traded via its Spanish province along Atlantic sea routes with lands as far as Ireland and beyond to Scandinavia is no great stretch.

    I believe there were people described as 'celts' from middle Europe and from Briton and Wales in Rome as part of the legions so when you think of Rome as the first great globalised trading bloc across all of Europe the lines are there for some communication, trade and of course arcane knowledge to pass from Egypt to Connacht and from the Norse halls down to North Africa.

    The Vikings certainly traded for southern Empire goods and travelled to the Med I think records indicate.

    Who knows what knowledge, maps, and cultural symbols crossed and merged with that kind of trading reach?
    It should also speak volumes about the potential for a post revolutionary Irish society-what we can achieve together and how we can move forward if we unite the country in a leftist republican manner. We could lay the foundations for a multicultural internationalist multilingual Ireland, like that of the 16th century, if we got independence. I mean real independence not pretend freedom as a result of selling out our mothers. I think Ireland was like you describe until the 1640s/50s and the arrival of cromwell and the ensuing 300 year occupation of our shores which is still in place today. I certainly want us to send out a message to the world that we are an irrevocably free and democratic sovereign that cares for all its people. Today I recieved this message in reply to an Icelandic course I am applying for next summer. There is also a scholarship I am looking at in 2013-14 and Ireland wasnt on the list of countries applicable. Here is the reply:

    Dear Andrew Purfield

    The tuition fee for the summer course is 360 EUR, books ca. 70 EUR and accommodation ca. 290 EUR, we assume you need ca. 20 EUR a day for food but that can be less, at lunch time you can have a hot meal for ca. 4 EUR at the Univ. Café. All accommodation is in less than 30 min. walking distance from the university so you don’t need to pay for busses.

    I will also send you a formal reply to your application with further information regarding the summer course.

    Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom so an Irish student can apply for the scholarship.

    Best regards
    Gudrun Laufey Guðmundsdottir
    Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies
    Sigurdur Nordal Office
    Þingholtsstræti 29, 101 Rvk.
    www.arnastofnun.is

    It's greatly offensive to be mistaken as part of the UK. Then again we're hardly free, are we?
    Last edited by Apjp; 07-11-2011 at 10:32 AM.

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Quote Originally Posted by antiestablishmentarian View Post
    One thing I've always wondered about Ireland and our culture is the extent of our links with abroad, how it influenced language and culture. To give a couple of examples, some foreign friends of mine asked me to give them a blast of the oul cupla focail to have a hear of it, they were of the opinion that it sounded similar to Arabic. Another example is sean-nos singing, which some people suggest bears a great resemblance to folk music of North Africa.

    One thing we tend to forget is just how cosmopolitan Ireland really was. Our native language has been influenced by diverse foreign tongues from Latin and Norse to English, the Gaelic world which we were the epicentre of encompassed most of Scotland and Man and on top of this the Gaels strongly influenced the Norse in Faroe and Iceland. That's before we even mention the fact that Dublin was founded as a Norse kingdom, Ulster was colonised by the Scots in the 13th and 14th centuries, Galway and Limerick are Norman cities, that Wexford and Fingal had their own unique languages (Yola and Fingalian, both very similar to Anglo-Saxon Old English) and that French was spoken in Waterford during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. Just an interesting thought, what lasting effect did the successive waves and the fresh blood bring to the character of the country?

    There was a cracking documentary on Yola on Radio 1 anti a few weeks back if I can dig out the link I will later for you mate. We as a people are a wonderful mix of Viking, Norman,Celt, Neolithic,English,Baque and other cultures that have come here from around the world. There is evidence in our mitochondrial DNA that we have Basque heritage. As someone said on this thread there is still a good few places where the place names still contain the evidence of these languages
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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Quote Originally Posted by Apjp View Post
    It should also speak volumes about the potential for a post revolutionary Irish society-what we can achieve together and how we can move forward if we unite the country in a leftist republican manner. We could lay the foundations for a multicultural internationalist multilingual Ireland, like that of the 16th century, if we got independence. I mean real independence not pretend freedom as a result of selling out our mothers. I think Ireland was like you describe until the 1640s/50s and the arrival of cromwell and the ensuing 300 year occupation of our shores which is still in place today. I certainly want us to send out a message to the world that we are an irrevocably free and democratic sovereign that cares for all its people. Today I recieved this message in reply to an Icelandic course I am applying for next summer. There is also a scholarship I am looking at in 2013-14 and Ireland wasnt on the list of countries applicable. Here is the reply:

    Dear Andrew Purfield

    The tuition fee for the summer course is 360 EUR, books ca. 70 EUR and accommodation ca. 290 EUR, we assume you need ca. 20 EUR a day for food but that can be less, at lunch time you can have a hot meal for ca. 4 EUR at the Univ. Café. All accommodation is in less than 30 min. walking distance from the university so you don’t need to pay for busses.

    I will also send you a formal reply to your application with further information regarding the summer course.

    Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom so an Irish student can apply for the scholarship.

    Best regards
    Gudrun Laufey Guðmundsdottir
    Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies
    Sigurdur Nordal Office
    Þingholtsstræti 29, 101 Rvk.
    www.arnastofnun.is

    It's greatly offensive to be mistaken as part of the UK. Then again we're hardly free, are we?
    To which I replied :


    Dear Gudrun,

    Many thanks for your information which I am sure will come in handy. I
    look forward to your reply on my application. However I would like to
    point out to you that Ireland is not part of the United Kingdom-it is
    a sovereign country under occupation by banking forces in the south
    and the British in the North. Ireland never was part of the United
    Kingdom.

    All the best,

    Andy Purfield

    I do worry that some people still see us as British. I did not hesitate with this reply.

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    Default Re: Towards a diagnosis of the Irish spirit; the overt and the clandestine

    Nice on Anti- I had a bit of a face off with a grumpy Belizean border guard who looked at my Irish passport and said 'UK, yes' at which I disagreed and pointed to the front of the passport which didn't carry the UK symbol.

    She then started arguing with me that Ireland was part of the UK- I had to give up when she started shifting her pistol belt around and the voice was rising so just gave her the 'yeah, yeah, yeah, and held out my hand for the passport which cut the thing short. I wouldn't mind but there was a map of the world and the wall behind her with different colouring for the Republic and the UK.

    A lot of the time it isn't someone trying to be funny- they just are a bit thick.
    Think National. Act Local. Oh- and superstition is just the dark matter of human history.

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