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Thread: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

  1. #121
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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Count Bobulescu View Post

    As for US plans to invade Haiti.........piffle..............US has plans to invade everywhere. Even has plans to nuke the moon.
    Precisely.

    I'm surprised you don't recall the controversy about medical teams being turned away after the arrival of the US military. There are many more reports than the Guardian's. The Wikipedia page on the earthquake is on the rough side, but does record the main events.

    10,000 troops were brought in. This inevitably lead to days, at critical stage, in which emergency supplies and rescue were postponed.

    http://crossedcrocodiles.wordpress.c...ghts-to-haiti/

    Port-au-Prince, January 19, 2010 – A Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) cargo plane carrying 12 tons of medical equipment, including drugs, surgical supplies and two dialysis machines, was turned away three times from Port-au-Prince airport since Sunday night despite repeated assurances of its ability to land there. This 12-ton cargo was part of the contents of an earlier plane carrying a total of 40 tons of supplies that was blocked from landing on Sunday morning. Since January 14, MSF has had five planes diverted from the original destination of Port-au-Prince to the Dominican Republic. These planes carried a total of 85 tons of medical and relief supplies.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_Haiti_earthquake

    The UN has just told Haiti it will not provide compensation to cholera victims.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013...s-compensation
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    [quote=C. Flower;320349]Precisely.

    I'm surprised you don't recall the controversy about medical teams being turned away after the arrival of the US military. There are many more reports than the Guardian's. The Wikipedia page on the earthquake is on the rough side, but does record the main events.

    10,000 troops were brought in. This inevitably lead to days, at critical stage, in which emergency supplies and rescue were postponed.

    http://crossedcrocodiles.wordpress.c...ghts-to-haiti/ [\quote]


    yep I remember the news at the time quite well, quite well, brightly clear in my mind, and also remember it was a massive earthquake that oh these pesky massive earthquakes just have this shattering power to flatten pretty much everything around including the presidential palace, roads aeroport all destroyed and paranoid folks like you thinking we' re NOT letting aid land their planes...


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_Haiti_earthquake

    The UN has just told Haiti it will not provide compensation to cholera victims.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013...s-compensation
    Whats keeping you from putting up the money and going out there and bail them out... how bout you put your deeds where your mouth is...

    who funds the UN? any of my money going into this?? how about your money??

  3. #123
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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    Quote Originally Posted by PaddyJoe View Post
    I don't mind whether you read it not. But to be fair you asked a question and I'm trying to provide part of the answer.
    Walmart, to single out just one US corporate, has a direct vested interest in keeping manufacturing labour rates in Haiti as low as possible.
    As they do in China, yet I don't see troops from the 101st dropping into Beijing.

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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Precisely.

    I'm surprised you don't recall the controversy about medical teams being turned away after the arrival of the US military. There are many more reports than the Guardian's. The Wikipedia page on the earthquake is on the rough side, but does record the main events.

    10,000 troops were brought in. This inevitably lead to days, at critical stage, in which emergency supplies and rescue were postponed.

    http://crossedcrocodiles.wordpress.c...ghts-to-haiti/



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_Haiti_earthquake

    The UN has just told Haiti it will not provide compensation to cholera victims.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013...s-compensation
    Did it ever occur to you that in the midst of such a massive catastrophe many parts of the civilian infrastructure of Haiti, such as air traffic control, would be drastically compromised? If the same thing happened to Dublin do you think landing planes at a severely curtailed Dublin Airport would be so simple? Seriously, there is no conspiracy, but as usual folks here will do there damnedest to see one.

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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dojo View Post
    As they do in China, yet I don't see troops from the 101st dropping into Beijing.
    Seriously, an invasion of China (population over 1.3 billion, nuclear armed) by the US would be a slightly different affair from an invasion of Haiti, an impoverished island a short boat trip away (pop. 10 million).
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    On now, listen live or later.

    Jonathan Katz was the only full-time American news correspondent working in Haiti at the time of the country's epic earthquake in 2010. In the aftermath of the disaster, billions of dollars and thousands of nongovernmental organization's flooded Haiti to aid in the recovery -- and Katz soon had plenty of foreign company. Today, many of the most basic promises of that recovery effort remain unfulfilled. We chat with Katz about what went wrong and what's in store for the country he covered for years.
    Guests
    Jonathan Katz
    Author, "The Big Truck That Went By: How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster" (Palgrave Macillian, 2013)



    http://thekojonnamdishow.org/shows/2...big-truck-went
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

  7. #127
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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    http://www.undispatch.com/why-cholera-in-haiti-why-now


    A dysfunctional puppet Government and a US military intervention designed for social control not reconstruction, have left the Haitian population in a desperately vulnerable situation.
    A bit of Wikileaks light shed on the US attitude to Haiti.

    On Feb. 29, 2004 – at about 6:15 a.m. – U.S. troops flew Haiti’s democratically elected president, Jean Bertrand Aristide, out of Haiti. In fact, they flew him out of the Western Hemisphere – all the way to the Central Africa Republic. According to the Bush administration’s comically implausible story, Aristide simply asked the U.S. to save him from a small group of insurgents led by a convicted death-squad leader, Jodel Chamblain. The public face of the insurgents was a crooked ex-police chief named Guy Philippe who had long standing ties with local elites and the U.S.. Chamblain was responsible for thousands of murders and rapes under a military junta that ruled Haiti from 1991 to 1994, after the first coup that ousted Aristide. It made sense to put the far younger Guy Philippe in front of cameras, but nobody with any knowledge of the 1991 coup had any excuse for failing to see what was coming in 2004.

    The insurgents had been launching hit and run attacks into Haiti for years (since 2000) from the safe haven offered by the Dominican Republic, a U.S. client. Jeb Sprague’s book Paramilitarism and the Assault on Democracy in Haiti documents how key players among Aristides’ “peaceful opponents” in Haiti, along with military and government officials from the Dominican Republic, closely supported the insurgents who killed dozens of people while the international press (and the human rights industry) ignored it and depicted some of the financiers as victims of a “crackdown on dissent”. The “crackdown” was one of the excuses the Bush administration used to starve the Aristide government of funds for years with the help of the OAS. U.S.-led sanctions, among other things, blocked funds for projects to improve Haiti’s water supply to protect against the spread of diseases like cholera. At the same time, tens of millions of U.S. government dollars flowed to Aristide’s political rivals.
    Sprague’s book reveals that, after Aristide was overthrown in 2004, hundreds of former rightist paramilitaries were incorporated into Haiti’s police force under the UN and U.S. Embassy’s close supervision. Anyone familiar with the 1991 coup will find this as unsurprising as it is disgusting. When the Clinton Administration ordered the Cédras military junta to stand down in 1994 (and permit Aristide to serve out what little was left of his first term in office), it did so only after guaranteeing impunity for the junta’s leaders and arranging for some of its henchmen to remain within Haiti’s security forces. Aristide, to some extent, countered those maneuvers by disbanding the Haitian army over strong U.S. objections. The re-constructed Haitian police remained infiltrated by officers close to the U.S. and local right-wing forces. Nevertheless, the U.S. and its allies were forced to a play a far more direct role in the 2004 coup because Haiti lacked its own army, the force traditionally used by the U.S. to bring down governments it dislikes.
    A few months after the 2004 coup, UN troops (known by the French acronym MINUSTAH) took over the task of consolidating Gérard Latortue’s post-coup dictatorship. Roughly 4,000 of Aristide’s supporters were murdered under Latortue according to a scientific survey published in the Lancet medical journal [1]. Hundreds more, by conservative estimates, became political prisoners. Most of the killing was done by the police and death squads allied with them. MINUSTAH generally provided tactical support but also perpetrated its own atrocities. On July 5, 2005, MINUSTAH went on a shooting spree in the shanty town of Cité Soleil that was so murderous (and so well documented) that a MINUSTAH spokesman felt obliged to promptly state that it “deeply regrets any injuries or loss of life during its operation”. In 2012, MINUSTAH found some of its troops guilty of rape and sexual abuse. The actual perpetrators, to say nothing their commanding officers, have evaded serious consequences even when found guilty. Over a hundred MINUSTAH troops have been sent out of Haiti to “face justice” at home for sex crimes. Little wonder that abusers have been undeterred.

    Thanks to Wikileaks, we need not speculate about exactly what the U.S. government wanted to get out of MINUSTAH in Haiti. In a 2008 cable, the U.S. Ambassador to Haiti predicted that the “security dividend the U.S. reaps from this hemispheric cooperation not only benefits the immediate Caribbean, but also is developing habits of security cooperation in the hemisphere…” She identified “resurgent populist and anti-market economy political forces” in Haiti as a threat to the entire hemisphere. She highlighted the importance of having other countries contribute towards neutralizing the threat:

    “This regionally-coordinated Latin American commitment to Haiti would not be possible without the UN umbrella. That same umbrella helps other major donors — led by Canada and followed up by the EU, France, Spain, Japan and others — justify their bilateral assistance domestically.”


    It won’t do for allies to explain to their own people that they are doing the USA’s dirty work in Haiti – helping it contain the political threat posed by “populist and anti-market forces” or, in other words, sacrificing Haiti as a pawn on a regional chessboard imagined by U.S. officials.


    After two years of terrorizing Aristide’s supporters – murdering, imprisoning and driving them into exile -the U.S. and its allies allowed Haitians to elect a government to replace Latortue’s dictatorship. The presidency was won by René Préval – a former president and Aristide protégé who had played no role at all in the 2004 coup. It was a stunning refutation of the propaganda used to justify the coup. Préval won the election in the first round despite barely being able to campaign. Candidates who had been prominent leaders of the coup (Charles Baker, Guy Philippe) received single digit percentages of the vote.


    The cables procured by Wikileaks show that Préval worried about being given the Aristide treatment while in office and treaded very carefully around U.S. officials. Former Brazilian diplomat, Ricardo Seitenfus, says that in 2010 MINUSTAH chief Edmond Mulet explicitly threatened Préval with a coup and exile for opposing U.S. interference in Haitian elections. Préval supposedly responded to Mulet’s threat by saying: “I am not Aristide. I am Salvador Allende”. Préval and Colin Granderson, head of the CARICOM-OAS Electoral Mission in Haiti in 2010-2011, have backed up the claim that Préval had been “asked” to step down.


    Seitenfus has also strongly denounced the corruption and hypocrisy of the key governments that sustain MINUSTAH – in particular the infamous “core group”: the USA, Canada, France, Spain, and Brazil. Commenting on the impact of the 2010 earthquake that may have killed 200,000 people, Seitenfus remarked: “Traditionally in Haiti, the ‘goods’ such as hospitals, schools, and humanitarian aid are delivered by the private sector, while the ‘bads’ — that is, police enforcement — is the state’s responsibility. The earthquake further deepened this terrible dichotomy.”


    An “aid” sector made up of foreign NGOs that are not accountable to the vast majority of Haitians breeds corruption and inefficiency, as former CARE employee Timothy Schwartz has also pointed out. It gives many NGOs, with some honorable exceptions, a strong incentive to thwart the development of democratic institutions in Haiti that would hold them accountable and take over many of their functions.
    Brazil stepped up to play a leading role in MINUSTAH. Today, despite various MINUSTAH related scandals, Brazil continues to supply the largest contingent of troops. Uruguay supplies the second largest contingent though President Mujica has pledged to withdraw them. Bolivia and Ecuador also supply troops. Venezuela’s Chavista governments, on the other hand, always recognized the 2004 coup for what it was and never took part in MINUSTAH.

    Thankfully, the backlash from Latin American governments was fierce when the USA and Canada maneuvered at the OAS to weaken a strong regional response against the 2009 coup in Honduras. Sanderson’s dream of “hemispheric cooperation” with the U.S. to defeat “populist and anti-market economy political forces” quickly became more of a fantasy. Edward Snowden’s revelations of extensive U.S. spying on the Brazilian government also poured cold water on the USA’s imperial dreamers. This year’s upper-class revolt in Venezuela – an undisguised attempt at “regime change” – was strongly opposed by the OAS, much to the Obama Administration’s dismay.
    Rejecting coups and coup attempts is very important step in the right direction. However, Latin American governments should move beyond that. They should call for the prosecution of MINUSTAH officials like Edmond Mulet. Eventually, the prosecution of his bosses in Washington, Ottawa, and Paris might become a realistic option.
    This article was first published by Telesur.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  8. #128
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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    More Wikileaks on the earthquake and the US response (hat tip to @redkahina). Timely given the news that the US is sending troops to Liberia ("to fight the ebola virus").
    The cables confirm that as well as exerting political control, the invasion stemmed from US fears of mass movement of Haitian refugees to the US.
    How very different from the many African countries that have taken in millions of refugees.

    The US operation was assisted by ample hysterical and racist coverage in the media painting the Haitians as dangerous and uncivilised. Hilary Clinton directed that any media not following this line should be targetted.

    http://www.thenation.com/article/161...rthquake-cable

    Washington deployed 22,000 troops to Haiti after the January 12, 2010, earthquake despite reports from the Haitian leadership, the US Embassy and the UN that no serious security threat existed, according to secret US diplomatic cables.

    Cables made available by WikiLeaks show how disaster capitalists sought "opportunity" in the devastated country.

    The cables, obtained by WikiLeaks, were made available to the Haitian newspaper Haïti Liberté, which is collaborating with The Nation on a series of reports about US and UN policy toward the country.
    Washington’s decision to send thousands of troops in response to the 7.0 earthquake that rocked the Haitian capital and surrounding areas drew sharp criticism from aid workers and government officials around the world at the time. They criticized the militarized response to Haiti’s humanitarian crisis as inappropriate and counterproductive. French Cooperation Minister Alain Joyandet famously said that international aid efforts should be “about helping Haiti, not about occupying Haiti.”

    The earthquake-related cables also show that Washington was very sensitive to international criticism of its response and that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton mobilized her diplomatic corps to ferret out “irresponsible journalism” worldwide and “take action” to “get the narrative right.”

    In a January 15 cable, Clinton told diplomatic posts and military commands that “approximately 4,000 U.S. military personnel will be in Haiti by January 16 and 10,000 personnel by January 18.” On January 17, Haitian President René Préval issued a “joint communiqué” with Clinton, in which Haiti requested that the United States “assist as needed in augmenting security,” helping to diminish the appearance of a unilateral US action and providing the rationale for what was to be the third US military intervention of Haiti in the past twenty years.
    Aware that there would be international dismay about US troops playing a security role, Clinton outlined a series of talking points for diplomats and military officers in her January 22 cable. She said they should emphasize that “MINUSTAH [UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti, as the occupation force is called] has the primary international responsibility for security,” but that “in keeping with President Preval's request to the United States for assistance to augment security, the U.S. is providing every possible support... and is in no way supplanting the UN's role.”
    Meanwhile, the UN claimed that its 9,000 occupation troops and police officers had the situation under control.

    At a January 18 meeting between President Préval and international officials, former Guatemalan diplomat Edmond Mulet, MINUSTAH’s new chief, said his troops “were capable of providing security” in the country. (Mulet had flown in on a Pentagon plane the day before to take over from Hédi Annabi, who was killed with 101 other UN personnel when the Hotel Christopher, which acted as UN headquarters, collapsed during the quake.) Mulet “insisted that MINUSTAH be in charge of all security in Haiti, with other foreign military forces limited to humanitarian relief operations.”
    On January 19, with Resolution 1908, the UN Security Council unanimously approved sending more than 3,500 reinforcements to Haiti “to support the immediate recovery, reconstruction and stability efforts,” increasing MINUSTAH to 12,651.

    But Obama administration officials said the additional US troops were necessary.
    "Until we can get ample supplies of food and water to people, there is a worry that in their desperation some will turn to violence,” Secretary of Defense Robert Gates told reporters six days after the quake. “And we will work with the UN in trying to ensure that the security situation remains good."

    No Serious Security Threat After the Quake
    After the quake, Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, resembled a war zone. Bodies lay strewn, collapsed buildings spilled into dust-filled streets, while Haitians frantically rushed to dig out survivors crying out from under hills of rubble. Several flattened neighborhoods looked as if bombing raids had destroyed them.
    But the one element missing from this apocalyptic scene was an actual war or widespread violence. Instead, families sat down in the street, huddled around flickering candles with their belongings. Some wept, some sat in shellshocked silence, while others sang prayers, wailing for Jesus Christ in Kreyòl: “Jezi!”
    In the quake’s chaotic aftermath, Préval and his prime minister, Jean-Max Bellerive, were out of touch with US government officials for about twenty-four hours. When they did connect, the Haitian leaders held a 3 pm meeting on January 14 with US Ambassador Kenneth Merten, the Jamaican prime minister, the Brazilian and EU ambassadors, and UN officials.
    President Préval laid out priorities: “Re-establish telephone communications; Clear the streets of debris and bodies; Provide food and water to the population; Bury cadavers; Treat the injured; Coordination” among groups amid the destruction, a January 16 cable explains. Préval did not mention insecurity as a major concern. He did not ask for military troops.
    But the same cable reports that “lead elements of the 82nd Airborne Division arrived today, with approximately 150 troops on the ground. More aircraft are expected to arrive tonight with troops and equipment.”
    The US government had already initiated the deployment of considerable military assets to Haiti, according to the secret State Department cables--before the Haitian government, it appears, formally requested assistance. At its peak, the US military response included 22,000 soldiers--7,000 based on land and the remainder operating aboard fifty-eight aircraft and fifteen nearby vessels, according to the Pentagon. The Coast Guard was also flying spotter aircraft along Haiti’s coast to intercept any refugees from the disaster.

    A January 14 cable from Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to US Embassies and Pentagon commands worldwide said that the US Embassy in Haiti “anticipates significant food shortages and looting in the affected areas.” But subsequent dispatches from Ambassador Merten in Haiti repeatedly describe "only sporadic” incidents of violence and looting.

    One January 19 cable said that the “security situation in Haiti remains calm overall with no indications of mass migration towards North America.” Another cable that day said, “Residents were residing in made-shift [sic] camps in available open areas, and they had not yet received any humanitarian supplies from relief organization. Nonetheless, the residents were civil, calm, polite, solemn and seemed to be well-organized while they were searching for belongings in the ruins of their homes.



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    Last edited by C. Flower; 18-09-2014 at 12:40 PM.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
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  9. #129
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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    There is a new book out on the same topic as this thread.

    Extract :

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...ft-a-disaster/
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    A lot of questions being asked about Bill Clinton's Haitian trust - not many answers coming *redacted*

    http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2015.../hait-j20.html

    Haiti as of the last two days has a one-man government.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/...0KS0CG20150119

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nati...le7601129.html
    Last edited by C. Flower; 20-01-2015 at 07:53 PM.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    Things getting interesting



    He just challenged Trump to ask Hillary Clinton to publish the audit of all the money they have stolen from Haiti in 2010.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-0...tried-bribe-me
    Politics is the gentle art of getting votes from the poor and campaign funds from the rich, by promising to protect each from the other. ~Oscar Ameringer

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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    I'd like to take this opportunity to offer CF an apology. Upthread I disputed her claim that Nepalese/UN soldiers had been responsible for the post-earthquake outbreak of Cholera. A few weeks ago the UN officially took responsibility.
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Count Bobulescu View Post
    I'd like to take this opportunity to offer CF an apology. Upthread I disputed her claim that Nepalese/UN soldiers had been responsible for the post-earthquake outbreak of Cholera. A few weeks ago the UN officially took responsibility.
    A gracious apology, and accepted.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
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    Default Re: The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?

    I missed this report filed by John Pilger back in 2010. I'm relieved that I was not the only person to have noticed that the US invaded Haiti- and he nailed it down more clearly than I did.
    28 January 2010

    The theft of Haiti has been swift and crude. On 22 January, the United States secured "formal approval" from the United Nations to take over all air and sea ports in Haiti, and to "secure" roads. No Haitian signed the agreement, which has no basis in law. Power rules in a US naval blockade and the arrival of 13,000 marines, special forces, spooks and mercenaries, none with humanitarian relief training.


    The airport in the capital, Port-au-Prince, is now a US military base and relief flights have been rerouted to the Dominican Republic. All flights stopped for three hours for the arrival of Hillary Clinton. Critically injured Haitians waited unaided as 800 American residents in Haiti were fed, watered and evacuated. Six days passed before the US air force dropped bottled water to people suffering dehydration.

    The first TV reports played a critical role, giving the impression of widespread criminal mayhem. Matt Frei, the BBC reporter despatched from Washington, seemed on the point of hyperventilating as he brayed about the "violence" and need for "security". In spite of the demonstrable dignity of the earthquake victims, and evidence of citizens' groups toiling unaided to rescue people, and even a US general's assessment that the violence in Haiti was considerably less than before the earthquake, Frei claimed that "looting is the only industry" and "the dignity of Haiti's past is long forgotten".


    Thus, a history of unerring US violence and exploitation in Haiti was consigned to the victims. "There's no doubt," reported Frei in the aftermath of America's bloody invasion of Iraq in 2003, "that the desire to bring good, to bring American values to the rest of the world, and especially now to the Middle East . . . is now increasingly tied up with military power."

    In a sense, he was right. Never before in so-called peacetime have human relations been as militarised by rapacious power
    http://johnpilger.com/articles/the-kidnapping-of-haiti
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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