Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 103

Thread: Halloween/Samhain

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The Grove
    Posts
    4,071

    Default Halloween/Samhain

    Halloween (or Hallowe'en) is an annual holiday observed on October 31, which commonly includes activities such as trick-or-treating, attending costume parties, carving jack-o'-lanterns, bonfires, apple bobbing, visiting haunted attractions, playing pranks, telling scary stories, and watching horror films.

    A Worldwide event observed by many, i'm up for the visiting haunted attractions and telling scary stories, what will you be doing?
    Happiness is an inside job.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    5,363

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    Wearing a hockey mask and killing busty young women. I will then be shot numerous times by a policeman and fall out of a window or off a wall.
    However, when people dash to the spot, I will have vanished.

    I will also employ an orchestra to follow me around and play dramatic music while this is all happening.
    "This isn't working,
    My middle-brow f**ker"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    5,333

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    Answering the doorbell to youngsters and, for some of the littlies, their parents. I love it. I grew up with some of the list of activities you mention, and so I think one should 'do' someting and not just collect treats, though they put lots of thought into the costumes.

    Forty two kids turned up last year. I know the attraction isn't the treats, it's the fact that I save the coppers from my purse all year in a small bucket. I cover them with dried beans or somesuch, and they get to dip (eyes closed) for money. That is the secret of my popularity. The middle class kids are all shy and polite about it. Some traveller kids are very clear. They roll up their sleeves, none of this eyes shut lark and grab a fistful. All good fun.
    With the cutbacks there will be no 50cent coins this year, Aaah..... don't tell the kids.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    5,363

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    There was a woman on Pat Kenny this morning talking about Halloween/Samhain.

    She was saying that the pumpkin thing is based an an Irish legend that there was a spirit named Jack who was rejected by both heaven and hell and had to wander the netherworld. He used a hollowed out turnip as a lantern to light his way, hence the term Jack o' lantern.
    The hollowed out turnip became a tradition among Irish people and when many emigrated to America, they used pumpkins, as turnips were obviously hard to come by.
    "This isn't working,
    My middle-brow f**ker"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The Grove
    Posts
    4,071

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    Quote Originally Posted by Griska View Post
    There was a woman on Pat Kenny this morning talking about Halloween/Samhain.

    She was saying that the pumpkin thing is based an an Irish legend that there was a spirit named Jack who was rejected by both heaven and hell and had to wander the netherworld. He used a hollowed out turnip as a lantern to light his way, hence the term Jack o' lantern.
    The hollowed out turnip became a tradition among Irish people and when many emigrated to America, they used pumpkins, as turnips were obviously hard to come by.
    The story of the carved vegetable as a lantern comes in many variants and is similar to the story of Will-o'-the-wisp retold in different forms across England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. An old Irish folk tale tells of Stingy Jack, a lazy yet shrewd farmer who uses a cross to trap the Devil. One story says that Jack tricked the Devil into climbing an apple tree, and once he was up there Jack quickly placed crosses around the trunk or carved a cross into the bark, so that the Devil couldn't get down. Another tale says that Jack put a key in the Devil's pocket while he was suspended upside-down.
    Another version of the story says that Jack was getting chased by some villagers from whom he had stolen, when he met the Devil, who claimed it was time for him to die. However, the thief stalled his death by tempting the Devil with a chance to bedevil the church-going villagers chasing him. Jack told the Devil to turn into a coin with which he would pay for the stolen goods (the Devil could take on any shape he wanted); later, when the coin/Devil disappeared, the Christian villagers would fight over who had stolen it. The Devil agreed to this plan. He turned himself into a silver coin and jumped into Jack's wallet, only to find himself next to a cross Jack had also picked up in the village. Jack had closed the wallet tight, and the cross stripped the Devil of his powers; and so he was trapped.
    In both folktales, Jack only lets the Devil go when he agrees never to take his soul. After a while the thief died, as all living things do. Of course, his life had been too sinful for Jack to go to heaven; however, the Devil had promised not to take his soul, and so he was barred from hell as well. Jack now had nowhere to go. He asked how he would see where to go, as he had no light, and the Devil mockingly tossed him an ember that would never burn out from the flames of hell. Jack carved out one of his turnips (which was his favourite food), put the ember inside it, and began endlessly wandering the Earth for a resting place. He became known as "Jack of the Lantern", or Jack-o'-Lantern.
    The term jack-o'-lantern originally meant a night watchman, or man with a lantern, with the earliest known use in the 1660s in East Anglia; and later, meaning an ignis fatuus or will-o'-the-wisp.[10] In Newfoundland and Labrador, both names "Jacky Lantern" and "Jack the Lantern" refer to the will-o'-the-wisp concept rather than the pumpkin carving aspect.

    A will-o'-the-wisp /ˌwɪl ə ðə ˈwɪsp/ or ignis fatuus ( /ˌɪɡnɨs ˈfætʃuːəs/; Medieval Latin: "foolish fire"), also called a "will-o'-wisp", "jack-o'-lantern" (or "jack-o'-the-lantern"), "hinkypunk", "corpse candle",[1] "ghost-light", "spook-light", "fairy light", "friar's lantern", "hobby lantern", "ghost orb",[2] or simply "wisp", is a ghostly light or lights sometimes seen at night or twilight over bogs, swamps, and marshes. It resembles a flickering lamp and is sometimes said to recede if approached. Much traditional, non-scientific belief surrounds the phenomenon, giving rise to the wide variety of names.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack-o%27-lantern
    Happiness is an inside job.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    5,363

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    Excellent stuff!
    Thanks, Trow.
    "This isn't working,
    My middle-brow f**ker"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    5,333

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    And Trow, don't forget the traditional food. Barm brack and colcannon (with kale, not cabbage). Absolute essentials along with apples and nuts.

    When we lived in Dublin my father started new traditions. He would buy exotic fruits in Moore St and they always included a coconut and pomegranates (or wine apples as we called them).

    There were no fancy costumes, just cardboard masks. One of my difficulties with the youngsters now is that I am not up to speed on all the new Disney/Pixmania/Xbox characters and they do like me to say what the costume is. I luckily have Harry Potter figured .

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    5,363

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    Quote Originally Posted by Spectabilis View Post
    And Trow, don't forget the traditional food. Barm brack and colcannon (with kale, not cabbage). Absolute essentials along with apples and nuts.

    When we lived in Dublin my father started new traditions. He would buy exotic fruits in Moore St and they always included a coconut and pomegranates (or wine apples as we called them).

    There were no fancy costumes, just cardboard masks. One of my difficulties with the youngsters now is that I am not up to speed on all the new Disney/Pixmania/Xbox characters and they do like me to say what the costume is. I luckily have Harry Potter figured .
    The woman on PK this morning said that if you got a matchstick in your brack, it meant that your husband was going to beat you
    "This isn't working,
    My middle-brow f**ker"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    5,333

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    Ah, you've reminded me. A coin was riches, a ring was marriage, a pea was...sumthin else and the matchstick was definitely a bad one. I used to wrap these in baking paper and put them in the brack mix. You would not believe the excitement of grown adults. The Australian who got the ring a few years back was thrilled to bits.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    12,044

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    I love these threads and everything about the original festivals. There is always cultural gold to be found in such streams. If you want spooky- in the last six months or so occasionally I will click on the bookmark for political world from my home computer and will get a black screen with 'Blocked by BSKYB' across it.

    We have checked with the provider and my flatmate is puzzled by it- last time it lasted for a few weeks and then suddenly all was okay again and the site was accessible. It went again three or four days ago and today it has just sorted itself again. I'm thinking it is Trow's return that has cleared it up.

    A puzzle- and no-one is adjusting our firewall or anything. Thanks for the wave of the staff anyway Trow!
    Last edited by Captain Con O'Sullivan; 27-10-2011 at 08:24 PM.
    Think National. Act Local. Oh- and superstition is just the dark matter of human history.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    5,333

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    Trow, do you have information on the Púca? That was the traditional ghostie/bogeyman/zombie of our childhood. (You have got me remembering, as you can see)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The Grove
    Posts
    4,071

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    Quote Originally Posted by Spectabilis View Post
    Trow, do you have information on the Púca? That was the traditional ghostie/bogeyman/zombie of our childhood. (You have got me remembering, as you can see)
    Púka, Pooca or Pooka are shape shifting Spirits that can appear as a black dog, goat, horse, ass or bull.
    The Pooka [Púka] has been seen in many locations, though not every person in a group has observed it.

    In the district of Templeogue, South Dublin, the sound of chains was heard at ''Pussy's leap'' the site of the death of a man knocked down by a runaway horse. Said to be a Pooka which grew in stature as it approached the man.

    Pooka get larger as they run, not a sight you want to have coming towards you.

    In the area around Loughs Conn and Cullen, Co Mayo, dogs have been visably affraid, perhaps sensing the presence of Pooka.
    At Ballghaderreen, Co. Rosscommon, a black dog walked through an iron gate and
    at Redcross, Co. Wicklow, a man reportedly tried to pat a black dog but it had no substance.

    From my encounters i can tell you that Pooka are animations that appear at and near Celtic sites. If you were to remove any item from such sites or damage them then under certain moons at certain times of the year [around about now] the Pooka will visit your home in the shape of a black dog with red eyes and a growl that will capture your attention

    It cant physically harm you like bite you or anything but can bring on a heart attack and frighten you to death. Any attempt to strike at it is futile as your hand or any object you might use will pass straight through it.

    They can also move through solid objects.

    Pooka often appear at and near Celtic sites as a warning. If you're not being destructful or tomb raiding then your fine. [relatively so]
    Happiness is an inside job.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    22,431

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    As a kid what really annoyed me was the apple suspended on a string or the one in a basin of water that you had to grab with your hands behind your back.
    No fun.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    in the national interest
    Posts
    17,682

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    This time last year




    She may be gone but the Zombie banks still walk the land of the living. *thunderclap*

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    12,044

    Default Re: Halloween/Samhain

    It sometimes strikes me as peculiar that there is such a debate about the Irish language and its place in modern society in Ireland and a determined section of the population committed to its preservation- but the language of symbols from our original culture is condemned I feel to those regarded as eccentric by many.

    All of the folklore means something and has an origin- whether it be the story of the monster in the lake which was obviously useful in keeping children away from treacherous waters to the refined folklore wrapped up in old traditions and hidden beneath a surface layer of occultism.

    Historians pay great attention to folklore as they know it can carry hidden messages and clues to life back beyond written records and we are extremely lucky and the envy of many in having such a rich tapestry of tradition going back beyond memory. I consider the folklore as a kind of oral hieroglyphic and one thing I am absolutely sure of- that underneath the layer of modern middle eastern mythology which is artifical in its construction and alien to us in form however powerfully it may have been impressed upon us over the last mere thousand years underneath is something far richer.

    Priests and bishops, to their irritation, know that their mediterranean caper is a mere layer on top of something far older, native and it runs deeper than they ever could reach into the Irish cultural consciousness.

    I won't go on too much about the bloody italian mess and its half-arsed mediterranean tomfoolery but it is one of the major bones I have to pick with that organisation or cult- apart from the current degeneracies it also attacked our own culture- and I'm pleased to have found that there was a core they could never get at. Just one of the reasons why I despise that cult and would see the back of them.

    We spend so much time in attempting to be like the Americans or the English in their obsession with consumerism as if there was anything worth having long term in copying their cultures. We'd be far better off in archaeology and rediscovering our own culture which lies hidden under the thin layer of nonsense we adopt from abroad and I've a feeling we'd be far happier and more confident as a people if we did.

    We've no need to be envious of other cultures. Our own is old enough to be envied.
    Think National. Act Local. Oh- and superstition is just the dark matter of human history.

Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Share us
Follow Us