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Thread: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

  1. #1
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    Default New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    Notwithstanding the alternative offerings from Toyota, Nissan, GM, and others, this seems like a step up!

    Tesla, the original all electric only, car company has just launched it’s first “family” car Sedan, the S series, starting at $49, 900 in the US. A $30K compact is in the pipeline. According to the website it’s original $100K+ roadster is available in 31 countries, so I would expect likewise for the S series. It also makes right hand drive versions

    Given the higher petrol prices in Europe I’ve thought it would be a more attractive proposition there than here, provided the gummint doesn’t discriminate against electric vehicles on a tax basis. That might be wishful thinking, given the implications that electric cars have for the gummint’s ability to raise revenue from petrol taxes. US gummint gives a $7,500 tax credit to subsidize purchase. UK also provides subsidies.

    Tesla is taking broadly the same approach to selling cars as Apple has taken to computers. Non traditional outlets. They have a showroom with four cars on the ground floor of an office building in downtown DC and other cities. Not another car dealership for maybe ten miles.
    The primary founder of Tesla motors, Elon Musk, also founded PayPal, SpaceX and Solarcity.

    http://www.teslamotors.com/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_Motors

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elon_Musk
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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    Behold, the Bobbycar for grown-ups.

    Last edited by TotalMayhem; 05-10-2011 at 11:37 PM.
    Thus all which you call Sin, Destruction—in brief, Evil—that is my true element.

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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    Seriously cool news, thanks....

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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    There are too many personal cars on our roads already instead of investing in public transport.

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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    Twenty coach bullet trains crisscrossing Connemara, austerity be damned!
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    Tesla are now discontinuing their original $120K+ all electric roadster model that could outrun a Lamborghini after demonstrating proof of principle, and are starting to focus on less expensive vehicles. A sub $30k compact is planned in a couple of years. I hope this one doesn’t suffer from comparisons with Delorean.

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57...20&tag=nl.e703
    The company last night unveiled the Model X, a sleek-looking cross between a minivan and SUV with clever "falcon wing" doors and a new electric all-wheel drive system. People can start placing reservations tomorrow for the Model X, which is expected to be available late next year with prices in the $55,000 to $75,000 range before tax incentives and rebates.

    Beyond making an attractive crossover, Tesla has shown how electric vehicles open up new design possibilities. The Model X isn't just an electric version of competing SUVs, it's a luxury vehicle that has useful features that its internal combustion or hybrid cousins couldn't have.

    The key to Tesla's cool design is the powertrain, built around a flat battery pack that extends from the front to rear wheels under the car. This provides a low center of gravity for good handling, but also allows for substantially more interior space than a vehicle with a transmission running under it.
    Tesla Model X preview (photos)
    More
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/busine...tml?tid=pm_pop
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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    New electric car batteries said to deliver three times the punch for half the price. Big news if it pans out.


    http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2012...nergy-density/
    Envia Systems, a battery maker based in California, announced on Monday what it called a “major breakthrough” in lithium-ion cell technology that would result in a significant increase in the energy density — and a sharp reduction in the cost — of lithium-ion battery packs. Envia is financed by the Energy Department and G.M. Ventures, the venture-capital arm of General Motors, as well as other investors.
    “We will be able to make smaller automotive packs that are also less heavy and much cheaper,” Atul Kapadia, chairman and chief executive of Envia, said in a telephone interview. “The cost of cells will be less than half — perhaps 45 percent — of cells today, and the energy density will be almost three times greater than conventional automotive cells.”
    Mr. Kapadia continued: “What we have are not demonstrations, not experiments, but actual products. We could be in automotive production in a year and a half.”


    “If it’s true, it’s a huge breakthrough, because the main problem for battery cars has been cost,” David Cole, chairman emeritus of the Center for Automotive Research, a nonprofit research group based in Michigan, said in a telephone interview. “Right now, the lithium-ion battery is about three times as expensive as it should be for reasonable commercialization. That kind of cost target is the holy grail, and once it’s achieved it’s game on.”
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    Cool new Fisker EV plugin hybrid if it ever gets built at an affordable price.

    http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/4/292...cept-announced
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    I just noticed by the post to click ratio that there is interest in this thread. I’ll try to post a little more frequently. Here are a few pieces on the EV industry in general from the last couple of days.

    Boeing is already using the lightweight materiel referenced below in their new 787 Dreamliner jet.

    http://blog.rmi.org/blog_the_electri...tly_plugged_in

    This reversal of traditional industry and government priorities engages three steep learning curves (making more lowers the cost)—in ultralight materials, structural manufacturing, and electric powertrain—that together create a breakthrough competitive strategy. Surprisingly, the smaller powertrain plus the carbon-fiber autobodies’ radically simplified manufacturing, requiring only one-fifth the traditional amount of capital, pays for the carbon fiber, making ultralighting free. That is, such ultralight carbon-fiber cars cost no more to manufacture than today's steel autos, but their higher value makes them more profitable to make and sell.
    Fallout from Solyndra has stalled clean energy loans. "The Energy Department was in such a rush three years ago to issue a loan to solar-panel maker Solyndra LLC that it gave the Treasury Department only a day to review the deal, according to a government report released Wednesday. Today, the situation is the opposite, industry officials say: The department is putting loans through such exacting reviews that some renewable-energy funds look as if they never will be disbursed. The issue came into focus Tuesday when the new chief executive of Fisker Automotive Inc. said the company would consider giving up on a hybrid-electric car factory in Delaware and building it overseas if it can't secure its financing. Until recently, the cornerstone of that financing was to come from a $529 million loan by the Energy Department...The department froze loan disbursements last May after Fisker missed a performance milestone, and the two sides have been negotiating since. Fisker now is seeking new partners." Ryan Tracy in The Wall Street Journal.
    I
    t would take years for most fuel-efficent cars to pay off. "Shoppers have more options than ever to fight back, including hybrids, plug-ins, electric vehicles and 'eco' or 'super fuel economy' packages. But opting for models that promise better mileage through new technologies does not necessarily save money, according to data compiled for The New York Times by TrueCar.com, an automotive research Web site. Except for two hybrids, the Prius and Lincoln MKZ, and the diesel-powered Volkswagen Jetta TDI, the added cost of the fuel-efficient technologies is so high that it would take the average driver many years -- in some cases more than a decade -- to save money over comparable new models with conventional internal-combustion engines. That is true at today’s pump prices, around $4, and also if gas were to climb to $5 a gallon, the data shows. Gas would have to approach $8 a gallon before many of the cars could be expected to pay off in the six years an average person owns a car." Nick Bunkley in The New York Times.
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-0...as-prices.html


    Just when it looked like electric cars were running out of juice, the return of $4 a gallon gasoline is generating new life for battery-powered vehicles.
    Electric-drive vehicles, including hybrids, plug-in models and pure battery-powered cars, were the fastest-growing segment in the U.S. auto market in the first quarter, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Sales of those models rose 49 percent to 117,182 vehicles in the first quarter, from 78,527 a year earlier before Japan’s earthquake and tsunami pinched output.
    http://www.wired.com/autopia/2012/04...ti-le-concept/
    If you’re waiting for a major automaker to fire the first shot across Tesla’s bow, the Infiniti LE Concept is it. Largely based on the bits that make up the Nissan LEAF, the LE is set to be the first mass-market luxury EV when it goes on sale in 2014. That sound you hear is Elon Musk nervously drumming his fingers on his desk.
    The Infiniti LE Concept makes its world debut at the New York Auto Show, coming in at 186.4 inches in overall length, it’s about the same size as the automaker’s entry-level G37 sedan.
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    Incidentally, the book Reinventing Fire is not new; I’ve had it for at least three years. You can get it free/gratis/ and for nothing as well, on the interwebs at the embed and here.

    http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/ReinventingFire

    Why cars will keep getting lighter.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/...g.html#excerpt
    A new book by Amory Lovins and the Rocky Mountain Institute, “Reinventing

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/...html#pagebreak
    Lately, much of the press coverage of electric cars has implied that the technology has been a huge letdown. See, for instance, USA Today’s story: “Are electric cars losing their spark?” The angst mostly centers around sales: In 2011, the first year they were available, the Nissan Leaf and Chevrolet Volt sold just 17,345 units in the United States — slightly below expectations.

    Placed in perspective, though, those weak sales don’t look all that apocalyptic. Over at the Rocky Mountain Institute, Randy Essex and Ben Holland point out that when gas-electric hybrids first rolled out in 2000, the Honda Insight and Toyota Prius had sales of just 9,350. Those figures looked anemic at the time, too. But in the ensuing years, the technology caught on and more than 2 million hybrids have been sold in the United States. If that’s any prologue, it could bode well for future plug-ins.

    But is this comparison apt? On the one hand, the new generation of electric vehicles enjoy a few advantages that Priuses didn’t. Gasoline prices sat below $2 per gallon back in 2000, considerably lower than today. What’s more, the latest round of fuel-economy standards, under which carmakers have to get their fleet averages up to 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025, should give the big auto companies incentive to roll out more plug-in vehicles in the coming years.

    But then again, today’s electric cars also face special hurdles that the old hybrids didn’t. For one, there’s “range anxiety,” in which would-be buyers of electric cars sometimes fret that their batteries will run out of juice and leave them stranded. (The Chevy Volt, which is still more of a hybrid than a true all-electric, has a gas-powered back-up engine precisely in order to allay this fear, but that’s also added to the car’s price tag.)

    What’s more, electric cars have recently had to endure panicky headlines over safety, after three separate Volt batteries caught fire in crash tests. On the technical merits, this wasn’t a huge worry: The batteries caught fire days or weeks after extreme crash testing in the laboratory, and even then the fires only broke out because post-crash procedures weren’t followed. As MSNBC’s Dan Carney snarks, “The lesson here is to get out of a crashed car within a few days, and be sure to turn off the lights when exiting.” There was also the little-noted fact that, as government statistics show (PDF), some 250,000 gas-powered vehicles catch fire in real-life settings every year.

    Still, as a new technology, this sort of disproportionate attention was inevitable. GM has now resolved the Volt’s battery issues, with new casings that will reportedly cost $1,000 per car, and the government’s probe into the fires is set to wind down soon. But until electric cars break through, they’ll likely continue to face a barrage of special scrutiny
    FedEx EV van trials.
    http://www.businessweek.com/articles...cle-experiment
    The problem, Sondi explains, is that each of these vans “requires the same amount of energy as an average suburban house.” If FedEx were to use an entire fleet of electric vans—roughly 100 to 200 vehicles per delivery center—when they recharged, their energy demands would be equivalent to a small neighborhood. And although they can go 100 miles per charge (and carry 3,300 lbs. of packages), once depleted they take eight hours to reach full capacity again.
    And guess what, Belfast’s famous DeLorean is coming back in 2013 as an all-electric at $95K. Lousy picture, car doesn't look great either.

    http://www.autoblog.com/tag/delorean%20electric/#

    From the just finished NY auto show.

    http://green.autoblog.com/2012/04/06...the-big-apple/

    Have yer new Tesla model S built to order. Check the pricing and options button here. These cars will leave a Porche in the dust.

    http://www.teslamotors.com/models
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-0...as-prices.html
    Just when it looked like electric cars were running out of juice, the return of $4 a gallon gasoline is generating new life for battery-powered vehicles.
    Electric-drive vehicles, including hybrids, plug-in models and pure battery-powered cars, were the fastest-growing segment in the U.S. auto market in the first quarter, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Sales of those models rose 49 percent to 117,182 vehicles in the first quarter, from 78,527 a year earlier before Japan’s earthquake and tsunami pinched output.
    Sales of the Nissan Leaf electric car will take off in August when Nissan begins producing it in the U.S., boosting output and possibly lowering prices, Ghosn said.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/25/su...gged.html?_r=1
    THE future would appear bright for the electric car. Gasoline prices are high. The government is spending billions on battery technology. Auto companies are preparing to roll out a dozen new electrified models. Concern is growing about the climate impacts of burning oil. And tough new fuel economy standards are looming.
    http://www.dailyfinance.com/2012/02/...-electric-car/
    The electric car has arrived, but odds are that there isn't one in your driveway.
    Several factors have gotten in the way of the eco-friendly automotive revolution, but at least now we can ask conspiracy theorists -- the ones arguing that oil companies and the government are blocking plug-in electric cars from the road -- to leave the room and take their tinfoil hats with them.
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    If the future is bright for the electric car, I take it electricity is cheap in the USA.

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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    Quote Originally Posted by Holly View Post
    There are too many personal cars on our roads already instead of investing in public transport.
    Holly... I have used public transport daily in Dublin for 60 years. Throughout that period it has been, unreliable, expensive (to me) and inefficient.

    For all of that period the night-worker and the shift-worker have never been catered for and are still not catered for.

    In many cases the nearest bus stop can be a mile or two from your destination.

    I have spent many thousands of hours standing in the rain for buses that disappeared without trace from the time-table.

    On long-distance buses I have seen them cruise by half-empty without stopping leaving passengers stranded in rural parts of the country.

    Try to complain?...... are you joking?

    Most of all ..... it has been my experience over the same period that those who advocate the use of public transport most vociferously..... never use it themselves.
    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, misdiagnosing it, and then misapplying the wrong remedies.”

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    Default Re: New Lower Priced Electric Cars Coming

    Quote Originally Posted by Holly View Post
    If the future is bright for the electric car, I take it electricity is cheap in the USA.
    Depends how you generate your electricity. Currently, per unit of energy, world oil is seven times more expensive than US Natural Gas. Hence the gas and fracking boom. Russian NG is priced around the same as oil. US NG $2.50 per unit and dropping, Russian $17. Oil is priced globally, NG locally.

    Edited to add US NG now below $2.00
    Last edited by Count Bobulescu; 14-04-2012 at 03:06 AM.
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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