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Thread: We can see through Big Bang to Previous Universe :Update - Gravitational Waves Confirmed

  1. #1
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    Default We can see through Big Bang to Previous Universe :Update - Gravitational Waves Confirmed

    http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/AAHFNF...-most-pop.html

    Is this the end of the "inflationary" theory of the universe ? Highly controversial, apparently, but has the appeal of continuity. The "Big Bang started it all" idea somehow never seemed to be credible to me, on intuitive grounds only.



    The circular patterns within the cosmic microwave background suggest that space and time did not come into being at the Big Bang but that our universe in fact continually cycles through a series of "aeons," according to University of Oxford theoretical physicist Roger Penrose, who says that data collected by NASA's WMAP satellite supports his idea of "conformal cyclic cosmology". p { clear: none ! important; }
    Penrose's finding runs directly counter to the widely accepted inflationary model of cosmology which states that the universe started from a point of infinite density known as the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago, expanded extremely rapidly for a fraction of a second and has continued to expand much more slowly ever since, during which time stars, planets and ultimately humans have emerged. That expansion is now believed to be accelerating due to a scientific X factor called dark energy and is expected to result in a cold, uniform, featureless universe.

    Penrose, however, said Physics World, takes issue with the inflationary picture "and in particular believes it cannot account for the very low entropy state in which the universe was believed to have been born – an extremely high degree of order that made complex matter possible. He does not believe that space and time came into existence at the moment of the Big Bang but that the Big Bang was in fact just one in a series of many, with each big bang marking the start of a new "aeon" in the history of the universe."
    Last edited by C. Flower; 11-02-2016 at 05:07 PM.

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    Default Re: We can see through the Big Bang to the Previous Universe

    Cactus Flower, Holy God made it all in six days. Don't believe in this nonsense. First there was nothing, then it exploded. please!

    Seriously though, this singular point of origin theory thing, does that still stand?
    Other people have a nationality. The Jews and the Irish have a psychosis: Brendan Behan

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    Default Re: We can see through the Big Bang to the Previous Universe

    Everyone knows it was David Hasselhof. Ye're all infidels.
    Think National. Act Local. Oh- and superstition is just the dark matter of human history.

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    Default Re: We can see through the Big Bang to the Previous Universe

    The universe always was is, always is is and always will be is.

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    Default Re: We can see through the Big Bang to the Previous Universe

    Quote Originally Posted by Buddha View Post

    Seriously though, this singular point of origin theory thing, does that still stand?
    Depending on which physicist you ask, yes, no, and maybe.

    Or perhaps, all of the above, in an infinite number of universes.

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    Default Does dark matter exist?

    The following is a link to a recent scientific America article entitled "Accelerated Expectations: All Eyes on Large Hadron Collider in Dark Matter Hunt". You will note a general air of pessimism in the article regarding the possibility of a dark matter particle being detected. "After all, astronomical probes that have sought out the signature of dark matter particles have come up empty, as have experiments on the ground designed to detect the stuff."

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...hc-dark-matter


    I will now synopsise the introduction to a book called "Reinventing Gravity' by Dr. John W. Moffat, professor emeritus of physics at the University of Toronto. Please forgive the crudeness of this synopsis as my grasp of these matters is not great ... but I hope to convey something of the gist of what Moffat is saying.

    ************************************************** *****


    Einstein's general relativity theory is not in perfect agreement with observational data. (the speed of outermost stars in galaxies for example) Also attempts to unify it with quantum mechanics have been unsuccessful.
    Furthermore, there are unsatisfactory aspects of Einstein's theory that relate to the beginning of the universe and the collapse of stars under their own gravitational forces.

    To save the theory it has been postulated that there must exist a large amount of "dark matter" in galaxies. This invisible and undetected "dark matter" neatly removes any need to modify the theory which constitutes the "standard model of gravity". Thus a consensus has formed in the scientific community that "dark matter" really exists, even though all attempts to detect the partices that supposedly constitute it have failed.

    Since 1998 problems have beeen compounded by evidence that the expansion of the universe is speeding up rather than slowing down. In order to explain this physists have postulated a "dark energy" that has a negative pressure and can therefore act like antigravity. The conclusion of this is that 96% of all the matter and energy in the universe is invisible! This is the view held by the vast majority of physists and astronomers today.

    But what if Einstein's theory was wrong? What if a modification to it explained the stronger gravity and apparent antigravity being observed today rather than throwing in invisible things to make the standard model work?

    Einstein was dissatisfied with one particular feature of general relativity: At certain points in spacetime his equations developed singularities; that is, the solutions of the equations became infinitely large. This has consequences for the view of the universe depicted by general relativity, particularly with regard to the birth of the universe and "black holes" (which Einstein did not like and considered unphysical).

    Over a period of 50 years starting with correspondence with Einstein when he was 20 John Moffat has developed a Modified Gravity theory. He believes MOG solves three of the most pressing problems in modern physics and cosmology. Because MOG has a stronger gravity than the standard model it does away entirely with the need for "dark matter". It also explains the origin of "dark energy". Moreover, MOG has no vexing singularities. Through the mathematics of the theory, MOG reveals the universe to be a different kind of place - perhaps even a more straightforward and sensible place - than we have been led to believe.

    "If MOG turns out to be true, one of the most popular hypotheses in science may fall: The big bang theory may be incorrect as a description of the very early universe. Because of the smoothness of spacetime in MOG there is no actual singular beginning to the Universe, although there is a special time equal to zero (t=0) as there is in the Big Bang theory. But in MOG, t=0 is free of singularities. The universe at t=0 is empty of matter, spacetime is flat, and the universe stands still. Because this state is unstable, eventually matter is created, gravity asserts itself, spacetime becomes curved and the universe expands. In contrast to the big bang scenario, the MOG universe is an eternal, dynamically evolving universe - which may have implications for philosophy and religion as well as astro physics and cosmology"

    [The marxists amongst us will know this is generally in line with the views put forward by Engels on the universe. SL)

    "There are only two ways of explaining the wealth of observational data showing the surprisingly fast rotational speeds of stars in galaxies and the stability of clusters; either dark matter exists and presumably wil be found, and Newton's and Einstein's gravity theories will remain intact; or dark matter does not exist and we must find a new gravitation theory.'
    Last edited by Sam Lord; 05-06-2011 at 07:17 PM.
    Do not rejoice in his defeat, you men. For though the world has stood up and stopped the bastard, the (female dog) that bore him is in heat again. Bertolt Brecht

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    Default Re: Does dark matter exists?

    Further information on Moffat and his theory:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Moffat_(physicist)
    Do not rejoice in his defeat, you men. For though the world has stood up and stopped the bastard, the (female dog) that bore him is in heat again. Bertolt Brecht

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    Default Re: Does dark matter exists?

    Most interesting.

    So, is Einstein's dark matter his equivalent of Darwin's missing link?
    Essential to his theory but not (as yet) proven to exist.

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    Default Re: Does dark matter exists?

    Quote Originally Posted by Griska View Post
    Most interesting.

    So, is Einstein's dark matter his equivalent of Darwin's missing link?
    Essential to his theory but not (as yet) proven to exist.
    It's not really Einsteins dark matter. In recent years observational data has arisen which is at variance with his theory - physists have come up with (or invented) "dark matter" to account for the variances though all attempts to detect a particle of this have failed to date.

    I am not so much reminded of the missing link as I am of Luminiferous aether.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luminiferous_aether
    Do not rejoice in his defeat, you men. For though the world has stood up and stopped the bastard, the (female dog) that bore him is in heat again. Bertolt Brecht

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    Default Re: Does dark matter exists?

    Quote Originally Posted by Griska View Post
    Most interesting.

    So, is Einstein's dark matter his equivalent of Darwin's missing link?
    Essential to his theory but not (as yet) proven to exist.
    Far from being essential to Darwinism the so called 'Missing Link' is a will-o-the-wisp of significance only to its opponents.

    Every 'missing link' that's found automatically creates two others - the one between it and its predecessor and the one between it and its successor.

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    Default Re: Does dark matter exists?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Lord View Post
    It's not really Einsteins dark matter. In recent years observational data has arisen which is at variance with his theory - physists have come up with (or invented) "dark matter" to account for the variances though all attempts to detect a particle of this have failed to date.

    I am not so much reminded of the missing link as I am of Luminiferous aether.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luminiferous_aether
    Gotcha.

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    Default Re: Does dark matter exists?

    Quote Originally Posted by Baron von Biffo View Post
    Far from being essential to Darwinism the so called 'Missing Link' is a will-o-the-wisp of significance only to its opponents.

    Every 'missing link' that's found automatically creates two others - the one between it and its predecessor and the one between it and its successor.
    Makes sense.
    I had a look at Wiki and it states that evidence (ie fossils) were in short supply in Darwins time.

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    Default Re: Does dark matter exists?

    Quote Originally Posted by Griska View Post
    Makes sense.
    I had a look at Wiki and it states that evidence (ie fossils) were in short supply in Darwins time.
    It wasn't until later that God thought it would be a great gag to make them and laugh at us when we thought they were real.

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    Default Re: Does dark matter exists?

    Quote Originally Posted by Baron von Biffo View Post
    It wasn't until later that God thought it would be a great gag to make them and laugh at us when we thought they were real.
    I know.
    Fossils as proof of where we came from!

    Everyone knows God made us in His own image.
    And God ain't no monkey.

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    Default Re: Does dark matter exists?

    Quote Originally Posted by Griska View Post
    I know.
    Fossils as proof of where we came from!

    Everyone knows God made us in His own image.
    And God ain't no monkey.
    That's blasphemy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanuman

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