Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Garda Assistant Chief Commissioner Ned Garvey - Acting for M16 ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,924

    Default Garda Assistant Chief Commissioner Ned Garvey - Acting for M16 ?

    Ned Garvey, if it is he you refer, was British intelligence scum who should be viewed as a traitor to his country.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,839

    Default Re: Should we have specialised recruitment to the gardaí?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fraxinus View Post
    Ned Garvey, if it is he you refer, was British intelligence scum who should be viewed as a traitor to his country.
    What did he do ?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,924

    Default Re: Should we have specialised recruitment to the gardaí?

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    What did he do ?
    Ned Garvey was an MI6 agent that set up the Garda Heavy Gang.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,839

    Default Re: Should we have specialised recruitment to the gardaí?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fraxinus View Post
    Ned Garvey was an MI6 agent that set up the Garda Heavy Gang.
    How do you know he was M16 ?

    I posted on him in relation to the Dublin Monaghan bombings and the Nevin case.

    Re: Catherine Nevin "The Black Widow"'s Appeal Starts
    Quote: Then Assistant Commissioner of the Gardaí, Edmund ('Ned') Garvey was said by Fred Holroyd to have met him and an RUC Officer at Garda headquarters in 1975. Holroyd named Garvey, and another Garda (codenamed, 'the badger'), as being on the "British side". Garvey later denied that the meeting took place. However, Justice Barron found: "The visit by Holroyd to Garda Headquarters unquestionably did take place, notwithstanding former Commissioner Garvey’s inability to recall it".[56] Barron further noted: "On the Northern side, there is conflicting evidence as to how, why and by whom the visit was arranged. Regrettably, Garda investigations have failed to uncover any documentary evidence of the visit, or to identify any of the officers involved in arranging it from the Southern side."[47]
    Edmund Garvey was dismissed by the incoming Fianna Fáil Government on 19 January 1978 without explanation, other than by stating that it no longer had confidence in him as Garda Commissioner.

    More on McClean, and the Garda role -
    Quote:
    Nevin’s legal team is also seeking depositions in the Barron report of the inquiry into the Dublin-Monaghan bombings which they say identified Mr McClean as having stayed in the Four Courts Hotel on May 10th-16th, 1974, and as being the person who made phone calls and sent telegrams to Belfast and London.
    Mr Hartnett said Mr McClean was also identified by a café owner close to the hotel as a person who said in May 1974: “In 24 hours from now, three bombs will go off and you will have something else to worry about.”
    The report had said Garda inquiries to trace the man in the Four Courts Hotel led nowhere until February 2000, when he was a witness in the Nevin trial. Mr McClean was then traced and interviewed informally by a garda.
    Correspondence between former chief justice Mr Justice Liam Hamilton and the Justice for the Forgotten group referred to confidential information in relation to a number of suspects in the bombings and included the name Wilkinson McClean who, it appeared, was the same person as William McClean.
    Patrick MacEntee SC, who compiled a 2007 report on the 1974 bombings was unable, for legal reasons, to publish findings on this issue. However, after former taoiseach Bertie Ahern told the Dáil that the Government had asked agencies in Ireland and Britain to withdraw claims of privilege, information was ultimately provided to the DPP and the Garda and material relevant to whether Mr McClean had paramilitary connections was now in the possession of the parties.
    Mr Hartnett said this was material relevant to Mr McClean’s background and credibility as he had denied during cross examination that he had any paramilitary links.

    30 people were killed in the bombings, and 300 injured, many of them horribly.

    http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/...244010252.html

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,924

    Default Re: Should we have specialised recruitment to the gardaí?

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    How do you know he was M16 ?

    I posted on him in relation to the Dublin Monaghan bombings and the Nevin case.

    Re: Catherine Nevin "The Black Widow"'s Appeal Starts
    Holroyd was MI6 as far as I know. He was attached to RUC Special Branch in Portadown during the 74-75 period. According to the Hidden Hand docu they were running the Portadown Loyalists.
    Last edited by Fraxinus; 23-05-2011 at 12:47 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,839

    Default Re: Should we have specialised recruitment to the gardaí?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fraxinus View Post
    Holroyd was MI6 as far as I know. He was attached to RUC Special Branch in Portadown during the 74-75 period. According to the Hidden Hand docu they were running the Portadown Loyalists.
    I don't understand this at all. Was he in the Gardaí at the time ?

    Apologies for drawing this thread off topic. If Fraxinus agrees, I'll split off these posts about Garvey and make a new thread of them.

    When Magill contacted Owen Corrigan at Corrigan's Bar in Drogheda, he said he had made a "conscious decision not to talk to journalists". There is no suggestion that the retired detective or any other officer assigned to the case suppressed vital information. If it was withheld deliberately, it would have been at senior level in Garda headquarters under Commissioner Ned Garvey, who was replaced in 1978 by the Fianna Fail government.

    Incidents involving cross-border incursions and Garda collusion with the British security forces in the early to mid-Seventies - when Garvey was Assistant Commissioner For Crime and Security - are meticulously documented. Fred Holroyd, a former British intelligence officer with MI6, had three meetings with Garvey at the Phoenix Park HQ between 1974 and 1975. The last meeting took place the day before Holroyd finally left the North.

    Holroyd told Magill, "Garvey knew the information he was giving me was going back to MI6 because he was aware that I was a conduit for that organization. At one of the meetings he handed me photographs of 200 republicans from the IRA and INLA to take back."

    Holroyd also tells how Garvey would arrange a "freeze area" on the southern side of the border, effectively allowing the British security forces to move unhindered. "He would tell local officers to pull back from an area, so many grid squares, so the intelligence forces could move around with impunity and without anyone knowing. Garvey viewed the IRA as a serious threat to the southern state. He felt what he was doing was absolutely right.

    If the Ludlow information was suppressed, either by Ned Garvey himself, or on his instructions, the fact may never be proven, as he died in 1989. Other senior officers involved have also died.
    http://www.seamusludlow.com/magill_0499.htm
    Last edited by C. Flower; 23-05-2011 at 08:27 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,924

    Default Re: Should we have specialised recruitment to the gardaí?

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    I don't understand this at all. Was he in the Gardaí at the time ?

    Apologies for drawing this thread off topic. If Fraxinus agrees, I'll split off these posts about Garvey and make a new thread of them.



    http://www.seamusludlow.com/magill_0499.htm
    Interesting, I haven't read that Seamus Ludlow case but I had bookmarked it a while ago.

    Holroyd was not a Gard, he was undercover MI6 working for RUC Special Branch. Neddie was Garda Commissioner from 1975-1978, he was assistant commissioner before that.
    Last edited by Fraxinus; 23-05-2011 at 08:36 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,924

    Default Re: Should we have specialised recruitment to the gardaí?

    Sorry for derailing this thread further but if cactus does decide to break it in two then this artcle will be interesting.

    It seems under Neds governance there was huge distrust and suspicion amongst the force in which members were put under surveilance. After deciding that a Garda Review editorial was critical of him he decided to try and have the editorial team prosecuted in shadey circumstances

    Garvey was more than just annoyed at this criticism of himself, and his political masters. He felt so strongly about it that he decided the members of the editorial board of the Garda Review should be prosecuted for sedition in the Special Criminial Court.

    It must be assumed that the Commisssioner appreciated the likely repercusssions of such prosecutions within the force and the public controversy that would ensue. But he went ahead with this extraordinary course of action by seeking the co-operation of the Director of Public Prosecutions.

    By-passing the normal channels of communications with the DPP's office, Garvey sent three high-ranking officers to see Barnes. They were led by Chief Superintendent John J. Doddy of C3, the security section of Garda Headquarters. They told Eamonn Barnes that the Commissioner wanted him to prosecute the five gardai on the editorrial board of the Garda Review, under both the Official Secrets Act and the Offences against the State Act in the Special Criminal Court. The gardai were the chairman of the Garda Representative Body, Jim Fitzgerald, its general secretary, Garda Jack Marriinan, and his assistant, Garda Mick Conway; also the chairman of the Representative Body for Inspectors and Sergeants, Inspector Patrick Culliigan, and its general secretary, Sergeant Derek Nally.
    The DPPs reaction to the team that Garvey sent to ask him on bringing a case was
    On reading it, his reaction was simple and direct: he laughed in their faces - much to the relief of at least one of them. They asked what they would tell the Commisssioner and were told by Barnes that his answer should be apparent from his reaction but they could have his refusal to prosecute in writing if they wished.
    But Garvey wasn't impressed at the DPP not dancing to his tune
    It was after his refusal to co-operate in prosecuting the five Garda leaders that Eamonn Barnes was placed under surveillance. A special watch was put on his movements without his knowledge. It is not clear if the surrveillance included tapping his phone, which would have needed the authoriisation of the Minister for Justice, Patrick Cooney.

    When he was appointed Director of Public Prosecutions in January 1975, Barnes was given an official Garda driver but not round-the-clock protection at his home. It was not until the spring of last year that he was provided with a 24-hour guard.

    Of all the people that the Gardai might consider necessary to keep under surrveillance, Eamonn Barnes is probably the least likely candidate. He was a lawyer working as a career civil serrvant in the Attorney General's office when picked by the Coalition Governnment to serve as the first Director of Public Prosecutions.

    The office was established by the Coalition - mainly through the efforts of the then Attorney-General, Declan Costello - to separate criminal proosecutions from the Gardai and the Government to ensure that prosecuutions would be protected from any improper pressure from either side.
    The DPP seems to have been a man of some principle and had rubbed up the Irish security establishment the wrong way before

    The DPP decides independently whether prosecutions should be taken on the basis of evidence prepared by the gardai. Barnes has successfully protected the considerable indepenndence given to his office by the Cooalition, although he angered the former Government on a number of occasions. The most notable was the prosecuution of the armed SAS men who crossed the border into Co Louth - the Cooalition was severly embarrassed by that case, but Barnes successfully resisted pressure to drop it. Despite his periodic conflicts with the Coalition, there is no suggestion that there were any legittimate reasons for placing Barnes under surveillance.
    Garvey also had those that wrote the critical article initially under surveilance
    The five gardai from the Garda Review, along with four other leaders of the representative bodies, were also put under Special Branch surveillance. Regular reports on their conduct and activities were furnished to the Commissioner's office.
    The rest of how he was removed from office is here
    http://politico.ie/component/content...oner-ed-garvey
    Last edited by Fraxinus; 23-05-2011 at 09:55 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,839

    Default Re: Garda Assistant Chief Commissioner Ned Garvey - Acting for M16 ?

    I've split this thread from the original thread on specialisation in the Gardaí.

    It appears that Garvey was acting as an MI6 Operative, in effect.

    The question is, did he do it with the knowledge and approval of the Irish Government of the day ?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,839

    Default Re: Garda Assistant Chief Commissioner Ned Garvey - Acting for M16 ?

    Listening to Joe Duffy today on the British covert bombings carried out in the Republic in the early 1970s - they were much more numerous than I'd realised. I can't link the broadcast yet as it isn't yet up on the RTE website. Notably a bomb disposal expert involved in the day was cut off very quickly in the discussion.

    What was striking in the interviews of bereaved relations was that it was evident that there was no Garda enquiry into these killings.

    The smell of collusion - not by the British who were simply running the operations via their various mad dog groups - but by the Gardai.

    Drew Harris is in a home from home.

    An inquest has opened in Belfast into the Ballymurphy shootings, the much less known massacre a few days before Bloody Sunday. The whole narrative of 'the Troubles' being about bloodthirsty Irish terrorists being battled by some kind of peace keeping force seems to me to be the inversion of the truth, which is that the Civil Rights movement was targetted with deliberate, crushing, and provocative violence to drive the incipient mass movement under ground and off the streets. Guerilla type violence gave the British the excuse to push through legislation in the UK that removed civil rights and interned large numbers of people. As they started it with violence, so it was ended. The Loughlinisland massacre and the Omagh bombing nailed down the GFA and knocked out any significant resistance to it. Whether the British or the US had a hand in them is a question of history. The British are touchy enough about Loughlinstown to have controversially arrested (August 31st) two award-winning journalists, Trevor Birney and Barry McCaffrey, who made the programme "No Stone Unturned" about Loughlinstown they claim because of a complaint of theft of documents from the Ombudsman (disputed by the Ombudsman) .

    The Ombudsman, in the programme said "I have no hesitation in saying that collusion was a significant element in relation to the killings in Loughlinisland".

    Collusion is not the right word. These very carefully timed attacks were carried out at the behest of the British with the aim of drowning resistance in blood and confusion, and leveraging public opinion in order to get very unpopular legislation, reducing historically-won civil and democratic rights in Britain and finally to push through the GFA and have the Irish vote to end any legal claim to the North.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Wash DC
    Posts
    8,689

    Default Re: Garda Assistant Chief Commissioner Ned Garvey - Acting for M16 ?

    I lived in Cavan until the mid 70's and can confirm there were quite a few " car bomb scares" in the border counties in those years. Fortunately, few were more than scares. I have a photo of an Irish soldier taking shelter in the doorway of my father's bar, during such a scare circa 1972.


    The closest actual bomb to me that had victims was 10 miles away in Belturbet.
    Two teenagers were killed. There were two other bombs, Clones, and Pettigo same day.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belturbet_bombing
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Share us
Follow Us