Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Irish Landed Estates Database

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    5,127

    Default Irish Landed Estates Database

    ALMOST 2,000 of Munster’s landed estates have been detailed in a new electronic database to be launched tomorrow. A further 3,230 of the province’s "big houses" have also been indexed. The database, being launched at NUI Galway, covers landed estates and period houses, mainly during the 1700s to the 1900s.

    A similar database for Connacht was compiled three years ago. Both provinces can be accessed at www.landedestates.ie.


    Read more: http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland...#ixzz1MoJUVfA5

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    7,492

    Default Re: Irish Landed Estates Database

    We really need to catch-up with these type of projects

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    12,044

    Default Re: Irish Landed Estates Database

    Best of luck ... the Farmers association loathe any such suggestion and are onto any proposal for a current database like a Fianna Failer on a brown envelope. They hate the very idea of it and I suspect lobby so hard against it (a) because they don't want anybody having an information about them and (b) they don't want the subject of all the land that was rezoned for development during the tiger years discussed at all.

    Many of these ghost estates were built on land farmers sold for astonishing amounts of money and this is not a subject the farmer's representatives want opened at all. Hence the opposition to any kind of current searchable register of land being available.
    Think National. Act Local. Oh- and superstition is just the dark matter of human history.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    5,333

    Default Re: Irish Landed Estates Database

    This database is of the old landed estates, families and country houses. It is historical and seems unlikely to be of use as a registry of current land ownership.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    12,044

    Default Re: Irish Landed Estates Database

    Yes- I agree it is of historical interest.
    Think National. Act Local. Oh- and superstition is just the dark matter of human history.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    5,127

    Default Re: Irish Landed Estates Database

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Con O'Sullivan View Post
    Yes- I agree it is of historical interest.
    Certainly is - I look forward to reading up on the local ones

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Irish Landed Estates Database

    Semi-related, an article on the descruction of many of the old 'Big Houses' by the IRA in 1919-1923 and especially in teh civil war of 1922-23.

    http://www.theirishstory.com/2011/06...sh-revolution/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,922

    Default Re: Irish Landed Estates Database

    Pue's Occurrences looks at the data base...

    http://puesoccurrences.com/2011/07/12/5494/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    in the national interest
    Posts
    17,683

    Default Re: Irish Landed Estates Database

    I have been reading Hansard all evening. Check this from a House of Commons debate on Ireland 1875.

    'At present the right hon. Baronet prided himself on the secrecy of his information; but he should like to ask him whether he was perfectly certain that the information he had received came from a perfectly reliable source? If it did, it would, of course, to some extent guide the House. Was he, in the slightest degree, quizzed by any of his correspondents?

    Had he heard of the celebrated Westmeath Rib-bon story? He would relate it briefly. A gentleman living in the county of Westmeath, possessed of considerable property and very fond of field sports, had a daughter, who disliked living in the country; she found the country very stupid and dull, and repeatedly asked her father to remove to Dublin, where he had a house. He refused to do so, as he was so fond of his field sports, and was much beloved by his neighbours.

    Soon afterwards he received a threatening letter. A few days later he received another, but he thought little of either. Some days afterwards there came another threatening letter, and not only that, but one in which his coffin was delineated. He then became alarmed, and sent for the stipendiary magistrate, the county dry nurse. He attended at the gentleman's house, saw the letters, and placed himself in communication with that sink of iniquity, Dublin Castle. Scores of detectives were sent down to the district, and domiciliary visits were paid to the houses of all the poor people, who were most roughly treated by the stipendiary and his myrmidons. But nothing could be detected as to the authorship of these threatening letters, though they still came pouring in. Nobody knew who wrote them, nobody knew anything about them, and the gentleman became seriously alarmed.

    He gave up his establishment in the country and removed into Dublin. His daughter was a very beautiful girl, just such a girl as could only be produced in his own Green Isle—blood, bone, and beauty, and plenty of it. She was universally admired, and had not been long in Dublin before proposals of marriage were made to her by a man who was fit for her. The wedding came off, and after the usual breakfast, when the young lady came down to take her departure, she threw her arms round her father's neck, and said to him—"Go down to the country, father; nobody will touch a hair of your head. You are beloved by everybody around you. Nobody wrote those letters but one person, and that person was myself. I wrote you every one of those threatening letters, and it was I who delineated that coffin. I found the country very dull; I asked you to leave it 20 times and come to Dublin. You refused, and, as it was very fashionable, I adopted the Ribbon scheme, and it completely succeeded."

    Did the right hon. Baronet ever hear that story? Most probably not; and why not? Because it was a story in favour of the people, and the right hon. Baronet did not go into the class of society that was favourable to the people, but only into that class that was hostile to them in every respect.'

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Share us
Follow Us