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Thread: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

  1. #136
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    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    Trinity College Dublin will remain affiliated with the Union of Students in Ireland

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    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    http://www.thejournal.ie/student-gra...43790-Jan2013/

    Food parcels being handed out to those students with no grants yet...
    History is the only true teacher, the revolution the best school for the proletariat - Rosa Luxembourg

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    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    Quote Originally Posted by fluffybiscuits View Post
    http://www.thejournal.ie/student-gra...43790-Jan2013/

    Food parcels being handed out to those students with no grants yet...
    It's very sad as so much for govt's promotion of knowledge economy.

    Jobs are very scarce for graduates as money is tighter now than before.

    Grant nowadays doesn't carry you though as you would need a part time jobs to keep it going.

    Masters here especially at Trinity and UCD are crazy in comparision with other universities at home. Thinking of going abroad and get a job there rather than here.

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    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    Quote Originally Posted by disability student View Post
    It's very sad as so much for govt's promotion of knowledge economy.

    Jobs are very scarce for graduates as money is tighter now than before.

    Grant nowadays doesn't carry you though as you would need a part time jobs to keep it going.

    Masters here especially at Trinity and UCD are crazy in comparision with other universities at home. Thinking of going abroad and get a job there rather than here.
    +1

    The cost of doing a masters , especially a taught masters, can run into thousands over here. There also a lot of graduates vying for the positions thereby making the pool of positions smaller for people. Add to that there is no part time jobs and its all a recipe for disaster...
    History is the only true teacher, the revolution the best school for the proletariat - Rosa Luxembourg

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    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    Given the fact that I have been having problems in organising my teaching internship in Prague over the last few days due to the relevant company's balance sheet, I have been re-thinking my options. I'm lucky enough this last week to have got a part time job paying 11 euro an hour(and I have another part time weekend job coming up), so I am thinking about doing a masters in Galway in Irish studies if I can get funding for even some of the fees. Quinn was on telly in 2011 and 2012 saying low earning students still had a right to a one year postgrad full time course. So I have sent him this email, even if only to get an angry secretary's reply:

    Dear Ruairi, or representative of same,

    I am writing to you to inquire about possible funding for postgraduate
    studies at the National University of Ireland in Galway. I cannot
    necessarily expect that you would trouble yourself to read my email,
    as I gather politicians employ many people to do that for them.
    However, I do hope somebody will give me a sufficient reply to the
    questions I wish to put to you about educational funding for post grad
    studies. I do hope you will not take issue with my preferred use of
    your first name as your government is, by your own admission, not
    running our country and it would therefore seem pretty pretentious to
    use the title of Minister when your office and your government are
    obeying outside agencies and doing more or less whatever they tell
    you. In any case I was never the deferential type myself. I would also
    ask you not to blame Fianna Fail for your continued implementation of
    their policies in your reply as I am perfectly aware what happened,
    and remember very much so the opposition's support of the government
    of Bertie Ahern and latterly Brian Cowen right upto the horrendous
    bank guarantee of late 2008, even if your party did object to minor
    issues within that guarantee.

    I will be honest with you, or whatever poor soul is reading this email
    on your behalf. I did not vote for you or your party in the last
    election as I did not believe what you said when you signed a pledge
    promising not to cut grants or hike university fees for undergraduate
    students, which no doubt you realise if you were to stand in the next
    election you would pay the price for politically. For some years now,
    indeed from about the time I was 15/16 years old and the Lisbon Treaty
    was rejected, I saw the electioneering that not just the Labour Party,
    but also other established political parties such as Fianna Fail and
    Fine Gael routinely engaged in. indeed, my memory stretches back to
    2007 and as a 15 year old watching incredible promises from all 5
    mainstream parties(Your own, FG, FF, the PD's as well as the Greens)
    of endless free money and endless prosperity for the public without
    explaining how it would be done beyond tax cuts(in the case of your
    own party, income tax cuts which Pat Rabbitte was most vocal as party
    leader in offering to the voters) and borrowing money. From 2008, I
    remember Labour saying how we should nationalise all major banks
    without saying whether we would pay their toxic debts, at a time when
    Fianna Fail was dragging its' heals over full nationalisation of all
    banks(something as we know it eventually capitulated for whatever
    reason so to doing).

    As in 2011, it would have been foolish of me to believe the lies,
    promises, untruths, or phoney pledges of whatever politician called to
    my family's doorstep in my first election, I voted for an independent
    Republican rather than the controversial Gerry Adams, but also rather
    than the obviously fake pledges of Labour, FF and FG, three parties
    who when it comes to actual policy are impossible to separate from
    their troika betters, if not each other. Indeed I was shocked that so
    many people believed the sheer lies of all three parties, or at least
    that so many believed the lies of both FG and Labour, but as I said it
    was my first election as a voter. I wonder will the electorate be so
    gullible the next time around, or will they give both parties a
    hiding. given the conservative and reactionary nature of the typical
    Irish voter, who knows. For anyone's guess, they might even return en
    masse to Fianna Fail.

    I was not old enough to vote in either Lisbon treaty, but given that
    unlike most politicians of the day I actually bothered to read some of
    the text, I would have voted no had I been 18 at the time.
    I voted no to the Fiscal Compact for the simple reason that I do not
    believe that Germany's government, which was the first to break EU
    Stability rules and which has also possibly been complicit in the
    hiding of Depfa and Deutsche bank's hundreds of billions debts and
    which is hypocritically lecturing the rest of the EU on how to run
    their own economies whilst they themselves magic away their bank's
    debts, or anybody else in Europe for that matter has sufficient reason
    nor right to lecture Ireland on how to spend its' money. Furthermore,
    the creditor banks, EU institutions and larger EU countries that are
    profiting from our current misery are championing an agenda that
    equates the sins of the Irish bankers and politicians and builders
    with the sin of being Irish. I feel then as I do now, that Ireland
    along with Greece is being scapegoated and that Germany's government
    in particular is doing now what Charlie McCreevy did 10 years ago when
    he lectured Europe on how to run their economies, and I believe
    Germany and Brussels will sooner or later have egg on its' face in
    that regard. As Frau Merkel is not my Chancellor and the Irish
    government is openly and contentedly if not proudly capitulant to her
    neo-imperial agenda, I saw no reason to give her the right to put her
    hand in my pocket and the pockets of everyone I know and care about.
    Furthermore I voted no to the Children's referendum as I cannot
    comprehend the point of making a big song and dance about children's
    rights whilst also cutting child benefit massively on those most
    dependent on it(large families such as that of my father's for
    example, and those of many of my relatives). I feel that once Angela
    Merkel gets re-elected next year, the extent of our misery will
    accelerate sharply and the country will look like Greece or worse as a
    result. In any future referendum designed to get Eamon Gilmore or Enda
    Kenny a pat on the head from herself, I will also vote no as I am not
    a well cushioned politician, banker or crony and am faced with
    actually thinking how these new laws from Europe actually effect my
    income, my freedom and my life as well as those of the people around
    me.

    Suffice it enough to say, my family has suffered in the last five
    years. My own father was unemployed for at least 3 years before
    finally finding a full time job again, on a wage hardly sufficient to
    look after a household that was until last year of 6 people, himself
    and the five of us, me, my older sister and three younger siblings, a
    brother and two more sisters. Given the system we have, I'm pretty
    sure no Minister's close relatives ever suffer or has ever suffered
    from the misery of unemployment, or devastating loss of income through
    Child benefit cuts, dole cuts, back to education grant abolishments
    and so on. My sister has emigrated to America. She left last June. My
    brother has started college, lucky enough not to be one of the 4'000
    people waiting on money to feed themselves as miraculously his grant
    has come through.

    And here I find myself, in my last semester. Although for the first
    two years of college I had a very good grant that I was most grateful
    for, it has since been reduced by about 70% as a result of decisions
    of the previous government that you promised to reverse(glad I saw
    that one coming). I had to work part time jobs in France to sustain my
    Erasmus stay over there, which was obligatory and which I could barely
    afford. I have worked about 10 different jobs since I started college
    to pay for my education, in the face of several grant cuts and much
    income uncertainty. It is amazing what I have done to stay out of debt
    and stand on my own two feet, independently of the influence of
    others, while the government keeps borrowing money to bail out
    Ireland's and Europe's banks. I guess some of us just have no choice
    but to stand on our own two feet. I might be poor, and still working 2
    part time jobs to pay for my education in the face of massive
    obstacles placed in my way by those who would never themselves be
    reliant on state help because of their position in our grossly unequal
    and unfair society, but at least unlike your government I am not in
    debt and I have my freedom. Without trying to be smug, I feel I have
    earned as much as I have got off the state to pay for my education,
    and so I don't owe anything to any politician in that regard, in that
    I have actually put what little money I got towards getting myself an
    education, rather than doing nothing whilst others make all my
    decisions for me as your government is doing, or rather not doing.
    Some of us have to make do with little. Unlike the 'Irish' government,
    I do not have the luxury of blaming Fianna Fail or the troika for my
    problems. I actually have to make choices in how I spend what little
    money I get. You might say, the freedom of not being in debt comes at
    a price, but it's a price worth paying.

    Which brings me to conclude, what am I to do next? I have been
    thinking about emigration. No doubt that would seem natural to those
    in power who believe it's a small island and we can't all stay here,
    while many of you live like royalty as the peasantry either starve or
    drown. I do speak French and German, but the experience of the last
    few years has taught me not to see myself as some deferential
    European, despite the commendable deference of the Irish political
    elite who no doubt, most of whom do not speak any foreign language
    despite their faux europhilia. It would seem to me that to be European
    in the Irish circumstance is to be deferential to vested interests, to
    lie down to continental and Anglozone betters on almost every area of
    policy, to pay everybody else's debts and to enslave yourself for the
    privilege of doing so. This is not something I am as an Irishman, a
    democrat, or as a human being willing to identify with and I abhor the
    fake identity that Europe offers, as it denies almost every member
    state the right to vote on European issues and disempowers national
    parliaments and governments(notwithstanding your own government's
    contentedness in capitulation) from doing what they were elected to
    do. No, despite a desire to travel in the future(to perhaps learn more
    languages and educate myself further) and despite having almost made
    arrangements for the immediate doing of same after my final exams, I
    still do hope to stay here and take part in some sort of move away
    from this fake emerging superstate, and to living in something more of
    an Ireland than a European and Irish bank debt servicing agency.

    So, having got a great deal off my chest, I would like to ask you if
    you intend on keeping your post-election promises of funding a full
    time graduate who has been on the special rate of HEA undergraduate
    maintenance grants for a one year postgrad programme. The Master's
    course I hope to pursue is Irish studies in Galway and it is my
    understanding, as you spent a great deal of 2011 and 2012 on
    television and in the press saying that you would preserve as
    'Minister' the right of a student whose family had exceptionally low
    income, to a one year postgrad course. As you have made that pledge
    repeatedly since taking office, will you please now confirm that I
    still have a right to such funding? My county council told me to
    contact SUSI but given the current disasters that are ongoing there,
    nobody has sought fit in the last month and a half to reply to my
    queries on postgrad funding. The fees are over six thousand euro, and
    I would hope for at least a substantial covering of the fees, given
    how you have gone on record on numerous occasions saying such funding
    was available.

    I would appreciate a swift reply on your behalf, as SUSI seems
    incapable of doing so.

    Yours,

    Andy Purfield.

  6. #141
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    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    I will admit it was two things that provoked that email 1. The Budget and the lack of mentioning of anything surrounding postgrad funding has led me to suspect something might have happened on the sly and 2. Well I guess I just felt like sending an angry email as well

    I did find this on student finance.ie just after sending that email this evening though 'Postgraduate students who meet the qualifying conditions for the special rate of grant will be eligible to have their post-graduate tuition fees paid up to the maximum fee limit (€6,270).' However, that was for 2012/13 so it's hard to know. My thinking has been if I am somehow allowed to get the fee coverings, I'd be as well to get a Masters. I'm looking at doing Irish and History in Galway, assuming they haven't scrapped this funding.

  7. #142
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    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    Quote Originally Posted by Apjp View Post
    Given the fact that I have been having problems in organising my teaching internship in Prague over the last few days due to the relevant company's balance sheet, I have been re-thinking my options. I'm lucky enough this last week to have got a part time job paying 11 euro an hour(and I have another part time weekend job coming up), so I am thinking about doing a masters in Galway in Irish studies if I can get funding for even some of the fees. Quinn was on telly in 2011 and 2012 saying low earning students still had a right to a one year postgrad full time course. So I have sent him this email, even if only to get an angry secretary's reply:

    Dear Ruairi, or representative of same,

    I am writing to you to inquire about possible funding for postgraduate
    studies at the National University of Ireland in Galway. I cannot
    necessarily expect that you would trouble yourself to read my email,
    as I gather politicians employ many people to do that for them.
    However, I do hope somebody will give me a sufficient reply to the
    questions I wish to put to you about educational funding for post grad
    studies. I do hope you will not take issue with my preferred use of
    your first name as your government is, by your own admission, not
    running our country and it would therefore seem pretty pretentious to
    use the title of Minister when your office and your government are
    obeying outside agencies and doing more or less whatever they tell
    you. In any case I was never the deferential type myself. I would also
    ask you not to blame Fianna Fail for your continued implementation of
    their policies in your reply as I am perfectly aware what happened,
    and remember very much so the opposition's support of the government
    of Bertie Ahern and latterly Brian Cowen right upto the horrendous
    bank guarantee of late 2008, even if your party did object to minor
    issues within that guarantee.

    I will be honest with you, or whatever poor soul is reading this email
    on your behalf. I did not vote for you or your party in the last
    election as I did not believe what you said when you signed a pledge
    promising not to cut grants or hike university fees for undergraduate
    students, which no doubt you realise if you were to stand in the next
    election you would pay the price for politically. For some years now,
    indeed from about the time I was 15/16 years old and the Lisbon Treaty
    was rejected, I saw the electioneering that not just the Labour Party,
    but also other established political parties such as Fianna Fail and
    Fine Gael routinely engaged in. indeed, my memory stretches back to
    2007 and as a 15 year old watching incredible promises from all 5
    mainstream parties(Your own, FG, FF, the PD's as well as the Greens)
    of endless free money and endless prosperity for the public without
    explaining how it would be done beyond tax cuts(in the case of your
    own party, income tax cuts which Pat Rabbitte was most vocal as party
    leader in offering to the voters) and borrowing money. From 2008, I
    remember Labour saying how we should nationalise all major banks
    without saying whether we would pay their toxic debts, at a time when
    Fianna Fail was dragging its' heals over full nationalisation of all
    banks(something as we know it eventually capitulated for whatever
    reason so to doing).

    As in 2011, it would have been foolish of me to believe the lies,
    promises, untruths, or phoney pledges of whatever politician called to
    my family's doorstep in my first election, I voted for an independent
    Republican rather than the controversial Gerry Adams, but also rather
    than the obviously fake pledges of Labour, FF and FG, three parties
    who when it comes to actual policy are impossible to separate from
    their troika betters, if not each other. Indeed I was shocked that so
    many people believed the sheer lies of all three parties, or at least
    that so many believed the lies of both FG and Labour, but as I said it
    was my first election as a voter. I wonder will the electorate be so
    gullible the next time around, or will they give both parties a
    hiding. given the conservative and reactionary nature of the typical
    Irish voter, who knows. For anyone's guess, they might even return en
    masse to Fianna Fail.

    I was not old enough to vote in either Lisbon treaty, but given that
    unlike most politicians of the day I actually bothered to read some of
    the text, I would have voted no had I been 18 at the time.
    I voted no to the Fiscal Compact for the simple reason that I do not
    believe that Germany's government, which was the first to break EU
    Stability rules and which has also possibly been complicit in the
    hiding of Depfa and Deutsche bank's hundreds of billions debts and
    which is hypocritically lecturing the rest of the EU on how to run
    their own economies whilst they themselves magic away their bank's
    debts, or anybody else in Europe for that matter has sufficient reason
    nor right to lecture Ireland on how to spend its' money. Furthermore,
    the creditor banks, EU institutions and larger EU countries that are
    profiting from our current misery are championing an agenda that
    equates the sins of the Irish bankers and politicians and builders
    with the sin of being Irish. I feel then as I do now, that Ireland
    along with Greece is being scapegoated and that Germany's government
    in particular is doing now what Charlie McCreevy did 10 years ago when
    he lectured Europe on how to run their economies, and I believe
    Germany and Brussels will sooner or later have egg on its' face in
    that regard. As Frau Merkel is not my Chancellor and the Irish
    government is openly and contentedly if not proudly capitulant to her
    neo-imperial agenda, I saw no reason to give her the right to put her
    hand in my pocket and the pockets of everyone I know and care about.
    Furthermore I voted no to the Children's referendum as I cannot
    comprehend the point of making a big song and dance about children's
    rights whilst also cutting child benefit massively on those most
    dependent on it(large families such as that of my father's for
    example, and those of many of my relatives). I feel that once Angela
    Merkel gets re-elected next year, the extent of our misery will
    accelerate sharply and the country will look like Greece or worse as a
    result. In any future referendum designed to get Eamon Gilmore or Enda
    Kenny a pat on the head from herself, I will also vote no as I am not
    a well cushioned politician, banker or crony and am faced with
    actually thinking how these new laws from Europe actually effect my
    income, my freedom and my life as well as those of the people around
    me.

    Suffice it enough to say, my family has suffered in the last five
    years. My own father was unemployed for at least 3 years before
    finally finding a full time job again, on a wage hardly sufficient to
    look after a household that was until last year of 6 people, himself
    and the five of us, me, my older sister and three younger siblings, a
    brother and two more sisters. Given the system we have, I'm pretty
    sure no Minister's close relatives ever suffer or has ever suffered
    from the misery of unemployment, or devastating loss of income through
    Child benefit cuts, dole cuts, back to education grant abolishments
    and so on. My sister has emigrated to America. She left last June. My
    brother has started college, lucky enough not to be one of the 4'000
    people waiting on money to feed themselves as miraculously his grant
    has come through.

    And here I find myself, in my last semester. Although for the first
    two years of college I had a very good grant that I was most grateful
    for, it has since been reduced by about 70% as a result of decisions
    of the previous government that you promised to reverse(glad I saw
    that one coming). I had to work part time jobs in France to sustain my
    Erasmus stay over there, which was obligatory and which I could barely
    afford. I have worked about 10 different jobs since I started college
    to pay for my education, in the face of several grant cuts and much
    income uncertainty. It is amazing what I have done to stay out of debt
    and stand on my own two feet, independently of the influence of
    others, while the government keeps borrowing money to bail out
    Ireland's and Europe's banks. I guess some of us just have no choice
    but to stand on our own two feet. I might be poor, and still working 2
    part time jobs to pay for my education in the face of massive
    obstacles placed in my way by those who would never themselves be
    reliant on state help because of their position in our grossly unequal
    and unfair society, but at least unlike your government I am not in
    debt and I have my freedom. Without trying to be smug, I feel I have
    earned as much as I have got off the state to pay for my education,
    and so I don't owe anything to any politician in that regard, in that
    I have actually put what little money I got towards getting myself an
    education, rather than doing nothing whilst others make all my
    decisions for me as your government is doing, or rather not doing.
    Some of us have to make do with little. Unlike the 'Irish' government,
    I do not have the luxury of blaming Fianna Fail or the troika for my
    problems. I actually have to make choices in how I spend what little
    money I get. You might say, the freedom of not being in debt comes at
    a price, but it's a price worth paying.

    Which brings me to conclude, what am I to do next? I have been
    thinking about emigration. No doubt that would seem natural to those
    in power who believe it's a small island and we can't all stay here,
    while many of you live like royalty as the peasantry either starve or
    drown. I do speak French and German, but the experience of the last
    few years has taught me not to see myself as some deferential
    European, despite the commendable deference of the Irish political
    elite who no doubt, most of whom do not speak any foreign language
    despite their faux europhilia. It would seem to me that to be European
    in the Irish circumstance is to be deferential to vested interests, to
    lie down to continental and Anglozone betters on almost every area of
    policy, to pay everybody else's debts and to enslave yourself for the
    privilege of doing so. This is not something I am as an Irishman, a
    democrat, or as a human being willing to identify with and I abhor the
    fake identity that Europe offers, as it denies almost every member
    state the right to vote on European issues and disempowers national
    parliaments and governments(notwithstanding your own government's
    contentedness in capitulation) from doing what they were elected to
    do. No, despite a desire to travel in the future(to perhaps learn more
    languages and educate myself further) and despite having almost made
    arrangements for the immediate doing of same after my final exams, I
    still do hope to stay here and take part in some sort of move away
    from this fake emerging superstate, and to living in something more of
    an Ireland than a European and Irish bank debt servicing agency.

    So, having got a great deal off my chest, I would like to ask you if
    you intend on keeping your post-election promises of funding a full
    time graduate who has been on the special rate of HEA undergraduate
    maintenance grants for a one year postgrad programme. The Master's
    course I hope to pursue is Irish studies in Galway and it is my
    understanding, as you spent a great deal of 2011 and 2012 on
    television and in the press saying that you would preserve as
    'Minister' the right of a student whose family had exceptionally low
    income, to a one year postgrad course. As you have made that pledge
    repeatedly since taking office, will you please now confirm that I
    still have a right to such funding? My county council told me to
    contact SUSI but given the current disasters that are ongoing there,
    nobody has sought fit in the last month and a half to reply to my
    queries on postgrad funding. The fees are over six thousand euro, and
    I would hope for at least a substantial covering of the fees, given
    how you have gone on record on numerous occasions saying such funding
    was available.

    I would appreciate a swift reply on your behalf, as SUSI seems
    incapable of doing so.

    Yours,

    Andy Purfield.
    An eloquent and (somewhat) sarky communication Apjp, and well done for composing it and sending it. I do think alas that it will be eloquence wasted on Mr. Quinn (or whoever does his 'small folks' letter reading for him) as millionaire 'socialist' architects who've spent three decades or more as ruling class insiders aren't going to have much interest (never mind sympathy) for the plight of young working class people like yourself struggling to get educated under the baleful auspices of Oireland Inc. He might pretend to such concerns, but only in the lead-up to a general election. But Apjp, do take pride in your ability to express yourself and your continuing refusal to take that neoliberal blue pill. Stay angry and don't let the bastards grind you down.
    "It is we the workers who built these palaces and cities here in Spain and in America and everywhere. We, the workers, can build others to take their place. And better ones! We are not in the least afraid of ruins. We are going to inherit the earth; there is not the slightest doubt about that. The bourgeoisie might blast and ruin its own world before it leaves the stage of history. We carry a new world here, in our hearts."
    — Buenaventura Durruti

  8. #143
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    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    Quote Originally Posted by Kid Ryder View Post
    An eloquent and (somewhat) sarky communication Apjp, and well done for composing it and sending it. I do think alas that it will be eloquence wasted on Mr. Quinn (or whoever does his 'small folks' letter reading for him) as millionaire 'socialist' architects who've spent three decades or more as ruling class insiders aren't going to have much interest (never mind sympathy) for the plight of young working class people like yourself struggling to get educated under the baleful auspices of Oireland Inc. He might pretend to such concerns, but only in the lead-up to a general election. But Apjp, do take pride in your ability to express yourself and your continuing refusal to take that neoliberal blue pill. Stay angry and don't let the bastards grind you down.
    One of the reasons I'd like to study the masters in Irish studies over there in Galway is firstly it offers a good chance to improve my Irish a fair bit, being close to the Gaeltacht and with basic translation classes involved in the study. Secondly it involves a lot of studying history and examining identity and a lot of their research according to a lecturer I spoke with who has worked there, is based around the lasting psyche burned into the Irish from the Famine. I think identity, expression and the legacy of the 'Famine' are probably the most important things any Ireland looking to reclaim its' independence will have to examine. The legacies of forced emigration and deference are the two most lethal ones that haven't really been questioned until very recently with TP. Coogan's new book. Of course there's the often overlooked fact that despite what our teachers tell us about Irish not being spoken in Leinster for 400 years, Irish was the language of over half the population right up until the Famine period. People in the Dublin mountains, Stoneybatter and other areas of inner city Dublin and indeed some areas of Meath and other pockets across what is known as modern Leinster(Wexford, Longford, Kilkenny and Louth for example) did actually speak the language up until this period. Losing a language also leaves a lasting mark in terms of losing the ability to express oneself. We should also bear in mind that not many other European countries lost their language the way it was lost here.

    I will keep spitting out those blue pills until there's none left! I do hope the Bus and Train Strikes will finally be the start of some sort of resistance.
    Last edited by Apjp; 12-01-2013 at 03:16 AM.

  9. #144
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    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    Quote Originally Posted by Apjp View Post
    One of the reasons I'd like to study the masters in Irish studies over there in Galway is firstly it offers a good chance to improve my Irish a fair bit, being close to the Gaeltacht and with basic translation classes involved in the study. Secondly it involves a lot of studying history and examining identity and a lot of their research according to a lecturer I spoke with who has worked there, is based around the lasting psyche burned into the Irish from the Famine. I think identity, expression and the legacy of the 'Famine' are probably the most important things any Ireland looking to reclaim its' independence will have to examine. The legacies of forced emigration and deference are the two most lethal ones that haven't really been questioned until very recently with TP. Coogan's new book. Of course there's the often overlooked fact that despite what our teachers tell us about Irish not being spoken in Leinster for 400 years, Irish was the language of over half the population right up until the Famine period. People in the Dublin mountains, Stoneybatter and other areas of inner city Dublin and indeed some areas of Meath and other pockets across what is known as modern Leinster(Wexford, Longford, Kilkenny and Louth for example) did actually speak the language up until this period. Losing a language also leaves a lasting mark in terms of losing the ability to express oneself. We should also bear in mind that not many other European countries lost their language the way it was lost here.

    I will keep spitting out those blue pills until there's none left! I do hope the Bus and Train Strikes will finally be the start of some sort of resistance.

    Woah! That anger was put to good use, see you took my advice (just kidding !)

    Great e mail, read the whole thing and you were straight to the point. Your points on identity are worthy of a seperate thread, think there is one already so I;ll revive it
    History is the only true teacher, the revolution the best school for the proletariat - Rosa Luxembourg

  10. #145
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Meath
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    8,581

    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    Belated email from SUSI, who had previously told me I would not get a grant but said nothing about fee coverage. Might be relevant to other undergraduate posters on here who have been in receipt of a specially low rate of grant/a disabled grant and so may at the very least, qualify for fee coverage. A bit of good news at last, if I can just save up enough this summer to pay for a year of study. Looking again at a masters in Irish and history in Galway:

    Dear Andrew

    Thank you for your e-mail.


    Postgraduate students who meet the qualifying conditions for the special rate of grant will be eligible to have their post-graduate tuition fees paid up to the maximum fee limit (€6,270).

    Applications are not being taken yet for 2013/14 academic year. Updates will be posted to the website as to when applications will be taken. You can apply on the studentfinance.ie website.

    I hope this information helps. Should you have any further queries, please do not hesitate to contact me again or alternatively you call the SUSI Helpline on 0761 087874 and one of my colleagues will be able to advise you further.



    Kind regards,


    SUSI Support Desk

  11. #146
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    Feb 2010
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    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    Did you get your grant, in the end ??

    Two private firms, Accenture, and SUSI, I'm sure got their fees.

    Senator Marie Moloney has welcomed today’s review report on the Student Universal Support Ireland (SUSI). The independent review by Accenture has identified a number of recommendations for the student grant awarding authority to address. This review is a result of quite a number of delays and complaints from students and parents last year which Senator Marie Moloney highlighted.

    Senator Moloney says: “Last October I became very concerned for student welfare following numerous calls from distressed parents regarding the delay in student grants being awarded. The whole application process was complicated and students/parents were left in the dark far too long by SUSI. We cannot have a repeat performance this year and so I hope that this report’s recommendations will be implemented asap. The awarding of grants must not be delayed by months leaving the burden of financing student’s education and living expenses solely on parents.”

    Some of the key recommendations include reducing the amount of documentation sought from applicants, improved training for SUSI support staff, increased management and staff resources, the development of an on-line self service tracker system for applicants and a dedicated SUSI website. In time it is recommended that the SUSI grant system will be a fully web based integrated automated grant application system.


    Ends:
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  12. #147
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    Nov 2010
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    in the national interest
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    17,684

    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    ffs

    TDs get a special direct email & phone number so students can be grateful for what they are already entitled to.



  13. #148
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    Aug 2010
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    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Did you get your grant, in the end ??

    Two private firms, Accenture, and SUSI, I'm sure got their fees.
    no grant only fees covered if you go full time and im just after being let go too so not taking out a loan either

    Sent from my GT-I8190 using Tapatalk 2

  14. #149
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    Feb 2010
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    78,982

    Default Re: The Hunt Report - Student Fees and Loans and Cuts to Grants

    Quote Originally Posted by Apjp View Post
    no grant only fees covered if you go full time and im just after being let go too so not taking out a loan eitherSent from my GT-I8190 using Tapatalk 2
    I'm sorry to hear that. Good luck in getting something else.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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