Page 2 of 15 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 218

Thread: Oil and water

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Out of my mind
    Posts
    12,147

    Default Re: Oil and water

    Quote Originally Posted by morticia View Post
    ..... and it just DID

    expect more riots

    http://www.rte.ie/news/2011/0131/oil-business.html

    Economy screwed. Can predict this merely from the oil price. More bad debts, here we come. And just wait for the eejits in the ECB to make things worse by raising interest rates.
    And the Suez Canal soon in the hands of the Muslim Brotherhood? Brace for paying a tenner for a litre petrol in the very near future.
    Thus all which you call Sin, Destruction—in brief, Evil—that is my true element.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    118

    Default Re: Oil and water

    Quote Originally Posted by TotalMayhem View Post
    Brace for paying a tenner for a litre petrol in the very near future.
    Aviation fuel will be similarly affected. I did all my travelling and got to see the world, while oil was cheap, plane tickets were cheap and the euro was strong.

    The next generation wont be so lucky, with oil at $200, theyll have to settle for a ferry trip to Wales or Blackpool for their summer holidays, like they did back in the '50s.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown
    Posts
    8,498

    Default Re: Oil and water

    Quote Originally Posted by IrishJobsForIrishWorkers View Post
    The next generation wont be so lucky, with oil at $200, theyll have to settle for a ferry trip to Wales or Blackpool for their summer holidays, like they did back in the '50s.
    indeed. We will have to live in hope that the global warming types, and not Youngdan and his mini ice age, are correct about future weather.

    let's face it, at 40 odd yoyos for half a tank, it costs up to E160 to get to Kerry and back, and the ferry isn't going to be cheap either.

    heck, Dublin has beaches..... we'll just have to hope sea level rise doesn't wipe them out.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,808

    Default Re: Oil and water

    The North African revolution has pushed the price of Brent Crude up and the WSJ is talking about a similar effect on the world economy to the Iranian revolution - stagflation.

    There is a credit fuelled bubble raging in the world already, with world production up to the level it was at at the height of the boom in 2007-8 - this has fuelled inflation.


    http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-...31-716473.html

    Control of the Suez Canal is a matter of extreme anxiety to some -

    Although widespread fears over Egypt's political unrest have momentarily retreated, risk-related assets remain susceptible to the very real risk that the crisis could take another turn for the worse.
    As thousands of protesters flooded the streets of Cairo last week, market observers and some Middle East experts drew comparisons to Iran's 1979 Revolution. The conflict triggered a global oil crisis that helped make the word "stagflation"

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown
    Posts
    8,498

    Default Re: Oil and water

    Every time we think the flow of brown chunks hitting the fan has slowed down a tad, there's another onslaught.

    And the Horsemen of the Apocalypse have been recruiting; we can add Pollution and Unemployment to the old quartet of death, war, famine and pestilence.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Out of my mind
    Posts
    12,147

    Default Re: Oil and water

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Control of the Suez Canal is a matter of extreme anxiety to some -
    It most certainly is, and fuel shortage and exploding prices will muzzle the cheers of solidarity for the Muslim Brotherhood in no time.

    To put it pretty starkly, the so-called developed world can't keep its act together more than a week without that steady mainline of Arabian oil, even though it doesn't represent most of the oil traded in the world. The margins are too thin. There's no wiggle room, really.
    They sink a few old clunkers in that canal and we're f*cked, PROPER f*cked.
    Thus all which you call Sin, Destruction—in brief, Evil—that is my true element.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,335

    Default Re: Oil and water

    Well it is of no concern to Chris Mathews anyway. And he is the one calling Palin stupid/


    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-l-asuIuXk"]YouTube - Chris Matthews thinks Egypt can see the Panama Canal from their windows[/ame]

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    118

    Default Re: Oil and water

    The irish could pay off their debts by acting as mercenaries in Suez War II.

    It would alleviate the unemployment problem as well.

    And Blackwater could use the Citywest conference centre for their recruitment days. That would help the NAMA non-performing loan problem as well.

    (Sorry, bad joke, time to hit the hay)

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,335

    Default Re: Oil and water

    Quote Originally Posted by IrishJobsForIrishWorkers View Post
    (Sorry, bad joke, time to hit the hay)

    What an excellent prediction

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Laois
    Posts
    460

    Default Re: Oil and water

    I recently listened to a presentation about the Water Supply project from Shannon to Dublin. There is no doubt that water is a growing concern and even the most sceptical only has to get the message from 007's Quantum of Solace to realise it goes deeper than a few worriers in pockets of the planet. While oil was the supposed resource they were hijacking it was actually water - both set to become a dribble as we throw them away on washing our cars and bathing our children every day all the while contaminating them to a point that we rely on oil dependent chemicals to provide us with safe drinking water.

    I was due to brief the Dail about this in two weeks but due to circumstances beyond my control........... Peak oil is not a theory. It is a geological fact. Oil is a finite resource. We hear of every find these days because they are rare. Anyone still arguing I suggest you get a leaving cert Geography book and read it - as with accelerated climate change, it is definite and it is on the national curriculum.

    To extract oil you must discover it. Global discovery peaked in the 60s. It has also become more energy intensive to extract so the return on the investment is getting smaller. It has become a sellers market and there is absolutely no getting away from that. Cheap oil has had it's day except for the few times OPEC will play around in order to lull us into false security and fool the addicts. In Ireland we are slightly buffered from the price rises as we have had inflated prices for a long time but the Americans - well they will be hit very hard making life for the rest of us a misery

    I could go on but I hope it is enough to say we need to wean ourselves off oil. There is absolutely no point in us celebrating 2016 as 100 years of independence. We have merely replaced the The British Empire with OPEC. As economic growth has been based on cheap oil. Our food, healthcare, transport, energy - everything is oil dependent. We are absolute fools to continue being that dependent when we know where it's headed and I never see Fintan O'Toole address that issue - ever.
    Offer solutions
    my blog - Clearing Clutter – the ramblings of an environmental activist http://theresaleaf.wordpress.com/

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Laois
    Posts
    460

    Default Re: Oil and water

    Just noticed this is in transport and infrastructure - typical!

    Much MUCH bigger than that.
    Offer solutions
    my blog - Clearing Clutter – the ramblings of an environmental activist http://theresaleaf.wordpress.com/

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    241

    Default Re: Oil and water

    Quote Originally Posted by Theresa View Post
    ...There is no doubt that water is a growing concern and even the most sceptical only has to get the message from 007's Quantum of Solace to realise it goes deeper than a few worriers in pockets of the planet. ....Peak oil is not a theory. It is a geological fact. Oil is a finite resource. We hear of every find these days because they are rare. Anyone still arguing I suggest you get a leaving cert Geography book and read it - as with accelerated climate change, it is definite and it is on the national curriculum.

    To extract oil you must discover it. Global discovery peaked in the 60s.....In Ireland we are slightly buffered from the price rises as we have had inflated prices for a long time but the Americans - well they will be hit very hard making life for the rest of us a misery

    I could go on but I hope it is enough to say we need to wean ourselves off oil. There is absolutely no point in us celebrating 2016 as 100 years of independence. We have merely replaced the The British Empire with OPEC. As economic growth has been based on cheap oil. Our food, healthcare, transport, energy - everything is oil dependent. We are absolute fools to continue being that dependent when we know where it's headed and I never see Fintan O'Toole address that issue - ever.
    Got any good news in your little bag of tricks or are you just one of the multitude of prophets of doom intent on scaring us all s**tless in order to justify your ultimate solution to the problems outlined above which never amounts to more than increasing taxes and levies that only serve to increase profits for energy, and now water suppliers, (not to mention swelling government coffers) while at the same time burdening the poor with punitive cost to provide their basic needs.

    You talk about "weaning us off" oil and refer to us as "addicts", as if we somehow sought out this greasy, filthy "drug" to satisfy some hedonistic impulse but nothing could be further from the truth. The reality is that the selfish interests of the oil barons and industry, aided and abetted by their lackeys in government have ensured that consumers have no choice but to depend on oil and have happily been forcing it down our throats and raking in money hand over fist. If we are the "addicts" then they are the dealers.

    I presume that even from the confines of your ivory tower you understand the concept of "dealers" in the drug sense. Sure you must do as you have based your myopic analogy on the very same concept. You will understand then that for dealers to be successful they must eliminate and restrict alternatives in order for their "drug" to become successful and, more importantly, profitable. Alcohol is the drug of choice for the majority simply because all threats to it's success have been criminalised or laden with extortionate taxes so as to ensure their elimination.

    Explain to me how the oil situation is any different. Where, despite decades of warnings regarding our oil dependency, are the alternatives to this dirty, filthy polluting liquid? Surely after the oil crisis of the 70's and the endless warnings about peak oil we should by now have viable and affordable alternatives to this sludge that you hate so much and that you blame for our climate crisis. We should, as you rightly know, but we don't. We don't because industry and government and vested interests have conspired for years to deprive us of an alternative and instead milk us for everything they can.

    Now they will force us to pay more, in higher taxes and levies, because the situation threatens to damage their cosy little cartel and reduce and limit their prospects of profit; and in order to deflect blame from their greedy self interest and their failure to provide viable alternatives they, and yourself, must play the guilt card and make us, the victims of their selfishness and greed, feel somehow guilty that we "chose" to indulge in an ever diminishing energy source that is causing damage to our planet.

    Consumers have had no hand or part in creating the situation that currently exists, and has for some time, in our oil dependency. If anyone should feel guilt it is the vested interests and the "fly by nights" in government who have ignored this issue for far to long and are only motivated now because they personally will be affected, in their wallets.

    If you seriously want to rectify this situation I suggest you stop blaming consumers for matters that they cannot control and instead turn your attention to the vested interests in oil, manufacturing, airlines and industry and the governments and policy makers who have neglected their duties and responsibilities for far too long.
    Goodbye FF, hello FG. Out of the frying pan, into the fire.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown
    Posts
    8,498

    Default Re: Oil and water

    Quote Originally Posted by Theresa View Post
    I was due to brief the Dail about this in two weeks but due to circumstances beyond my control........... Peak oil is not a theory. It is a geological fact. Oil is a finite resource. We hear of every find these days because they are rare. Anyone still arguing I suggest you get a leaving cert Geography book and read it - as with accelerated climate change, it is definite and it is on the national curriculum.
    Wow; I also take this issue very seriously (I'm a scientist, and while this is not anywhere near my field, logic (and the price rises) would dictate that this issue is unlikely to go away, although the price will dip every time the recession gets worse rapidly (like it did after Lehman's collapsed... $147, July 2008, $35, Dec 2008). But each peak may be higher than the last, also each dip.

    I'm probably not really allowed to ask, so feel free not to answer, but I'd love to know vaguely who (or which groups) in the Dail was taking this seriously enough to request a briefing; also, which organizations are qualified to supply one?

    My informed suspicions are that everyone is stuck in a mental global warming loop; those that see the expense of renewables to business and employment oppose them, without considering the fact that fossil fuel supplies are not inexhaustible. Meanwhile, the environmental lobby is trying to persuade us all to reduce our consumption voluntarily....when we're all totally dependent on the stuff. As is employment and economic growth. I think the powers that be have made a terrible mistake focussing on "global warming". Not that it is not serious, but actually, I'd be inclined to think there's not enough oil down there to fry us entirely. Peak oil could result, in 20 years, in a global population 1/10 its current size.

    Meanwhile all energy is being put in to treating the symptoms (collapsing banks and unpaid debts), while putting the trillions into new infrastructure that is required to ameliorate it is put off while we all fight over the scraps that will be left. What else was Iraq about, if not energy security?

    I have tried to raise awareness of this (here and elsewhere, also via a submission to YCYC, and by talking to any odd politically inclined types when they come my way). My grandmother's response sums it up for the older generation; we have been supposedly running out of oil since the 1960's why should we worry about this now??

    If there is anything that can be done to help........???

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown
    Posts
    8,498

    Default Re: Oil and water

    Mouse, in fairness, I for one am not trying to blame consumers, nor, I think in fairness, is Theresa, although I would be the first to blame the Green party in this regard.

    I would completely agree with you re the oil industry and others; while they can still make ever increasing profits from this, they will, and they may not care too much about the starving.

    I am also unclear about the benefits of increased taxation if everyone still needs the stuff to survive.

    But it remains the case that it is not a renewable resource, nor is it infinite.

    What would you suggest??? Because the problem requires solutions at over 100 bucks a barrel, and the sufferers will be the ordinary consumers like you and me.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,808

    Default Re: Oil and water

    North African events are driving oil prices up...

    http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/...breaking8.html


    Oil was headed for a second straight week of gains as Egypt's volatile situation kept markets on edge, while investors await US employment data expected to give direction to prices later in the day.

    Brent crude for March gained 18 cents today to $101.94 a barrel at 0737 GMT, after touching $103.37 yesterday, the highest intraday price since September 26th 2008, and then sliding on a stronger dollar. US crude rose 40 cents to $90.94.

    The Obama administration is discussing with Egyptian officials the immediate resignation of president Hosni Mubarak as one of several scenarios for a transition of power, a US official said.

    Front-month Brent has rallied more than $7 since unrest in Egypt started 10 days ago, from about $95 a barrel on January 25th. That 8 per cent gain is more than a third of last year's total increase of 22 per cent.

    Violence has raged between pro- and anti-Mubarak demonstrators after the president declared he would resist demands to leave now and would remain in power until September.

    Egypt's unrest has sent shockwaves across the Middle East and North Africa, which combined produce more than a third of the world's oil, with protests in Yemen and reforms in Jordan and Algeria after Tunisia's president was toppled last month.

    "Ultimately, for the oil market, the uncertainties being introduced by the current political situation in Egypt have a far more long-term bearing," said Barclays Capital analysts.

    "Overall, the threat to the oil supply and the consequences of the oil supply loss seem relatively limited in this case, despite the heightened risks of a more violent transition to the new regime," they added.

    So far, the unrest in Egypt has not affected traffic on the Suez Canal or flows on the Suez-Mediterranean (SUMED) oil pipeline. Egypt controls both the canal and the pipeline, which together moved over 2 million barrels per day (bpd) of crude and oil products in 2009, the latest data available.

    The expanding US economy is pushing prices up, but that expansion appears to be a bubble, driven by credit and printing.

    More instability is the only certainty.

Page 2 of 15 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Share us
Follow Us