Page 16 of 16 FirstFirst ... 6141516
Results 226 to 233 of 233

Thread: Seán Garland benefit -Leading trade unionists and political figures oppose extradition

  1. #226
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Baile Átha Cliath
    Posts
    5,092

    Default Re: Seán Garland benefit -Leading trade unionists and political figures oppose extradition

    Sean Garland passed away this evening.

  2. #227
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    2,994

    Default Re: Seán Garland benefit -Leading trade unionists and political figures oppose extradition

    Condolences to his family. Certainly he was a man who stuck to his political principles.
    "If you go far enough to either extreme of the political spectrum, Communist or fascist, you'll find hard-eyed men with guns who believe that anybody who doesn't think as they do should be incarcerated or exterminated. " - Jim Garrison, Former DA, New Orleans.

  3. #228
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    3,690

    Default Re: Seán Garland benefit -Leading trade unionists and political figures oppose extradition

    Quote Originally Posted by pluralist View Post
    Condolences to his family. Certainly he was a man who stuck to his political principles.
    Was he?

    How does his condemnation of terrorism/ political violence of the PIRA sit with his sitting at the head of the political wing of the OIRA who were deliberately robbing, racketeering and murdering at the same time that Garland and Co were condemning his old chums in the PIRA?

    AAA with Guns?

  4. #229
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    2,994

    Default Re: Seán Garland benefit -Leading trade unionists and political figures oppose extradition

    Shaadi, I don't know enough about such matters to venture an opinion.
    "If you go far enough to either extreme of the political spectrum, Communist or fascist, you'll find hard-eyed men with guns who believe that anybody who doesn't think as they do should be incarcerated or exterminated. " - Jim Garrison, Former DA, New Orleans.

  5. #230
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    3,690

    Default Re: Seán Garland benefit -Leading trade unionists and political figures oppose extradition

    Quote Originally Posted by pluralist View Post
    Shaadi, I don't know enough about such matters to venture an opinion.
    That's fair enough.

    If you're ever interested in finding out then a read of The Lost Revolution would be a great starting point. A click on the link below reveals a few very revealing pages of the book.

    " Heffernan had decided to resign his general secretary position and a new General Secretary role was created for Garland, ratifying his primacy within the movement's political and military wings"
    There's some juicy stuff on those pages about Harris wanting to purge the green ( supposed nationalists like Mac Giolla, O Cionnaith and Heffernan ) leaders of the party so that the party could make it as a Communist Party.

    https://books.google.ie/books?id=r-f...20SFWP&f=false
    Last edited by Shaadi; 17-12-2018 at 10:49 PM.

  6. #231
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    2,994

    Default Re: Seán Garland benefit -Leading trade unionists and political figures oppose extradition

    Ah ok. I've been meaning to check out The Lost Revolution for quite a while but haven't gotten around to it.
    "If you go far enough to either extreme of the political spectrum, Communist or fascist, you'll find hard-eyed men with guns who believe that anybody who doesn't think as they do should be incarcerated or exterminated. " - Jim Garrison, Former DA, New Orleans.

  7. #232
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,865

    Default Re: Seán Garland benefit -Leading trade unionists and political figures oppose extradition

    Quote Originally Posted by pluralist View Post
    Ah ok. I've been meaning to check out The Lost Revolution for quite a while but haven't gotten around to it.
    Someone has borrowed my copy. It is one of the better books of modern Irish history, I think.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  8. #233
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    2,014

    Default Re: Seán Garland benefit -Leading trade unionists and political figures oppose extradition


    Tribute to Sean Garland, Anne Finnegan Glasnevin, 18/12/18


    I must say I feel honoured to be asked to speak at the funeral of Sean Garland. Sean, a quiet man, had remarkable qualities and lived an extraordinary life. Change does not come about by accident; it is brought about by foresight, organisation and determination. Change in Ireland certainly did not happen by government decree. It came about as a result of the efforts of people of whom Sean was a leading figure who challenged the narrow, backward, deeply conservative Irish society.

    At this point I would like to extend condolences to his family. Above all Mary who was a true companion sharing the joys, the struggles and the hardships and always there to back him up when he needed support most. In the last number of years this was particularly hard but Mary always stood up bravely despite the severe circumstances. To his daughter Caoimhe, son-in-law, Danny, grandchildren Oliver and Alannah, his brother Jimmy, sister Chrissie and his extended family sincere condolences.

    I have heard Sean described in recent years as a man of steel – a very neat media friendly phrase but one that should be subject to scrutiny. Sean was a man of principle who had a clear vision of what he wanted: a secular, socialist republic. All his being went into achieving that aim. Nothing was allowed to detract; he was clear and he expected others who shared that aim as Workers’ Party members to do likewise. If he thought there was anything detracting from that aim he was quick to say so. You were never in any doubt where you stood.

    Party work should be carried out honestly and with a respect for people. After all Sean knew the tremendous effort from so many that went into building the party. He saw people sacrifice and give their lives and so it is understandable that his tolerance for anyone undermining the aims of the party for whatever reason was zero. Sloppiness and disrespect hit a low toleration level. Does this make him a man of steel? I don’t think so. In my view it makes him human.

    No doubt Sean was strong and determined. This was shown time and again throughout his life. It was shown as he, while injured, carried the dying Sean Sabhat in an attempt to save his life going on to be hospitalised and then imprisoned.

    Where did this commitment and determination come from?

    The Republican Movement that Sean joined was a nationalist one with the aim of uniting Ireland and there is no doubt but that he as others at that time put every effort into this endeavour. With the failure of the 56-62 campaign came a re-think in the direction of the movement. Sean came to realise as Connolly did that the removal of Britain from the six counties meant nothing. He agreed with Connolly that ‘the Irish worker who starves in an Irish cabin and the Scots worker who is poisoned in an Edinburgh garret are brothers with one hope and destiny.’

    His extensive reading and self-education brought him to the realisation that it was people that needed freedom …not the land. He studied the experiences of those who sought to establish a republic in the preceding centuries. Capitalism was a brutish backward system that held the resources of the earth in the hands of a few. A new society was required to reach a higher order in the development of humankind…a society where people would own and democratically control all wealth.

    Sean’s aim now was to wrest the resources of the earth from the hands of the greedy few and put them at the disposal of the many. In Ireland what was needed was a party that represented the downtrodden class, the working class. Sean was now a communist and the next couple of decades was spent building what was to become The Workers’ Party. Slow and steady the building was successful until 7 seats were held in Dail Eireann, many council seats throughout the country and a European seat. A party of the working class. The party was a lot stronger than its size in influence putting pressure on other left wing parties. It embarrassed the right wing exposing the narrow interests they really serve. Also trade unions were influenced as dedicated activists put forward well researched arguments on housing, ownership of resources etc. Members were thoughtful, dedicated, grew in confidence in putting forward their views and this made a good impression.

    Others also watched the growth of The Workers’ Party – a party with allegiance to none of the traditional conservative institutions. This party only represented the interests of workers. This was an appalling development and was watched with horror by wealthy interests. They knew that the potential for further growth was enormous but the party as yet lacked the capacity to stretch to other constituencies. The capitalist class are not fans of democracy and especially when their interests were under threat.

    Sean one of the chief organisers – always pointed to the members and people such as Tomas MacGiolla, Cathal Goulding, Dessie O’Hagan and more.

    From the moment the Republican Movement declared a left wing interpretation of the world it came under fire from traditional conservative elements of Church and state. The Officials were slated from the altar as evil Communists and the Provisionals promoted as saviours of Northern Catholics. Newspapers were frequently highly critical and seldom complimentary. This criticism grew as the party gained in strength. It was however not successful in undermining the party. Many factors were at play in the ’92 split. This included the fall of the Soviet Union, some with inflated egos chose to put personal promotion first and not doubt encouraged to do so. However, I do not believe there has ever been a full exploration of the circumstances behind the attempt to totally annihilate a party dedicated to working class interests. For certain the result is now a much meaner country and politics reverted to the same difficult-to-distinguish-between political parties.

    Sean was critical of those who held power in the socialist countries and held them responsible for the setback in the socialist project. In his address at Bodenstown in the 200th anniversary of 1798 Sean quoted from a statement from South African comrades on the situation arising from the collapse of the ‘European Socialist countries’ which he said ‘echoed our view’: We are under no illusions as to the damage done over the decades by those who called themselves Socialists and Communists. The failings and crimes of some individuals or groups in no way negates the basic principles of Socialism, of Freedom, Equality and Democracy. We have heard much …about the failures of Socialism and yet nothing …about the failures of Capitalism which continues to exist solely because it is able to exploit millions of people around the world.’

    Sean outlined qualities which he considered essential: loyalty, commitment, discipline, unity and class consciousness.

    Sean achieved much for the class he worked for. He was clear who he stood with and he was clear on those who stood in the way of justice for those people. Among his enemies and The Workers’ Party’s enemies were the bankers who brought the country to its knees; those at the top of the rich list some mean minded enough to challenge through the courts pay and conditions of workers already on poverty wages.

    Sean was singled out for persecution, I believe, because he was so effective and single minded in his pursuit of furthering the cause of humanity and as such a threat to the wealthy and powerful. While President of an Irish political party, The Workers’ Party, he was pounced on by police in Belfast, brought to a police station and asked repeatedly if he would talk to the ‘Americans’. Each time he refused knowing that if he did he would be whisked away another victim of the extraordinary rendition run by the Bush regime at the time where people were lifted and tortured. In time he did what Party comrades wanted him to do: return south and fight from there.

    Those who rule the world find democracy a hindrance and this was shown as those across Irish politics and internationally rallied to fight this naked bullying behaviour.

    In time the Americans issued an extradition order in the republic and Sean was again pounced on. Incarcerated in Wheatfield Prison in a cold January he described conditions: no proper provision of clothing or blankets and a freezing cell the wall of which was partly open and breezy. With his wry humour he told how each morning he would be asked if he would like a newspaper and which one would he like. He would answer, ‘The Irish Times.’ Later each day he would be approached again and told, ‘Sorry, The Irish Times is all sold out.’ This was a tedious, petty, grinding down form of treatment meted out by this institution.

    On release he was all but in name subject to house arrest having to report to a particular Garda Station every day – this was reduced but still very restrictive and disruptive to normal routine.

    I ask again where did Sean’s commitment and determination come from?

    We know where it came from. His regard for others – his ability to empathise with others - came from his family in Dublin’s tenements where he was raised. It came from the inspiration from others who sought to forge a republic: the United Irishmen and the French revolution, the Fenians and Connolly.

    Far from being a man of steel Sean was a flesh and blood social being who sought to overturn the barbaric and backward capitalist powers and put in place a higher order where humanity can flourish.

    We too are social beings and as such we know that this project is now more urgent than ever. Only acting as socially responsible beings – as a community – can the world be saved for future generations as the horror of climate change threatens. Socialism is the only answer.

    Humanity cannot afford to dehumanise a man who made difficult moral choices; that leaves it too easy for us to avoid responsibility. The brand is human not steel.

    Sean concluded his ’98 Bodenstown address with the words - in Irish which he always promoted in his quiet way – as follows: “Sin Deireadh an Oraid seo. Go raibh mile maith agaibh. Slan Abhaile agus go n-Eiri and Bhothair libh.’
    Slan leat, Sean.
    Sean Garland, Rest In Peace.

Page 16 of 16 FirstFirst ... 6141516

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Share us
Follow Us