Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Heroin Addiction in Afghanistan - A NATO War Crime

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,847

    Default Heroin Addiction in Afghanistan - A NATO War Crime

    http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com/a...-opium-tragedy

    A good, short article on the exponential growth of heroin addiction in Afghanistan since the arrival of the US / NATO forces ten years ago.

    UN Reports in 2000/2001 showed that opium production had been virtually wiped out by the Taliban.

    The invasion was followed not only by an explosive growth in opium production but also rapid expansion of heroin production.

    UN Report - Heroin Use in Afghanistan - 2009 Surveyhttp://www.unodc.org/documents/data-and-analysis/Studies/Afghan-Drug-Survey-2009-Executive-Summary-web.pdf

    A culture that had lived with opium use for many years became one in which small children were instead given heroin to pacify them. A Russian anti-drugs expert has said we face the prospect of "the total narcotization of the younger Afghanistani generation".

    According to the latest UNODC survey, approximately 1 million Afghans are now addicted to drugs, which corresponds to roughly 8 percent of the country's adult population, or twice the global average. Whereas the number of regular opium users was 150,000, or 1.4 percent of the adult population, in 2005 (the date of the previous UNODC survey, .pdf), the current figure now is around 230,000, or almost 3 percent. The number of heroin users has increased from 50,000 to 120,000. This surge has occurred primarily in the south of the country, where most of the narcotics production -- and the Taliban -- are concentrated. Sarah Waller, a UNODC expert, said of the increase, "We've never seen anything like this in the history of the world."
    The line spun on the heroin industry is that after the invasion, the Taliban suddenly switched from opium elimination to mass production of heroin to fund the war.

    This seems highly improbable, as the Taliban's anti-drug stance was cultural and religious. It seems likely that a new layer of Afghans stepped in to a situation fostered by the occupation. Notoriously, Karzai's brother is known as one of Afghanistan's biggest drug traffickers. The linked article makes it plain that NATO is at very least complicit with the trade.

    Not only Afghanistan but also Pakistan, Western China, Iran and Russia are being devastated by the trade, which also has led to a flood of cheap heroin in Europe.

    Earlier this month, representatives of many of these countries came together at an international conference in Moscow on "Drug Production in Afghanistan: A Challenge for the International Community."
    The history of the CIA's dependence on and manipulation of the heroin trade from Vietnam to Afghanistan is told here - the article suggests that Afghanistan may have been invaded not because of 9/11 but because the Taliban had cut off heroin production.

    http://www.rawa.org/temp/runews/2008...ghanistan.html

    It goes in detail into who in US intelligence and government has been most involved in the heroin trade.

    These strange bedfellows endured a rocky relationship until July 2000 when Taliban leaders banned the planting of poppies. This alarming development, along with other disagreements over proposed oil pipelines through Eurasia, posed a serious problem for power centers in the West. Without heroin money at their disposal, billions of dollars could not be funneled into various CIA black budget projects. Already sensing trouble in this volatile region, 18 influential neo-cons signed a letter in 1998 which became a blueprint for war—the infamous Project for a New American Century (PNAC).
    Fifteen days after 9-11, CIA Director George Tenet sent his top-secret Special Operations Group (SOG) into Afghanistan. One of the biggest revelations in Tenet’s book, At the Center of the Storm, was that CIA forces directed the Afghanistan invasion, not the Pentagon.
    The whole of Central Asia is at risk from this horrible form of covert warfare.
    All the easier to balkanise this whole region and steal its oil, gas and mineral wealth.

    The Opium Wars continue.

    This photograph is of addicts at Osh, S. Kyrgyzstan, the place where masked gunmen linked to US backed ex PM Bakiyev fomented deadly interethnic violence in the last fortnight.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Cork
    Posts
    2,375

    Default Re: Heroin Addiction in Afghanistan - A NATO War Crime

    From the link- Quote: Nushin Arbabzadah, writing for The Guardian, theorized that “U.S. Army planes leave Afghanistan carrying coffins empty of bodies, but filled with drugs.” Is that why the military protested so vehemently when reporters tried to photograph returning caskets? Unquote.

    Theorised. That's the operative word. Most of this CIA drugs funding wars stuff is fantasy. The Vietnam experience showed that most of the drug running was done by the senior officers of the US army who used Dubai as a conduit. ********** got their slice and the start of their wealth today. Much more mundane than CIA conspiracy theories.
    Last edited by C. Flower; 27-06-2010 at 12:47 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,847

    Default Re: Heroin Addiction in Afghanistan - A NATO War Crime

    Quote Originally Posted by Lapsedmethodist View Post
    From the link- Quote: Nushin Arbabzadah, writing for The Guardian, theorized that “U.S. Army planes leave Afghanistan carrying coffins empty of bodies, but filled with drugs.” Is that why the military protested so vehemently when reporters tried to photograph returning caskets? Unquote.

    Theorised. That's the operative word. Most of this CIA drugs funding wars stuff is fantasy. The Vietnam experience showed that most of the drug running was done by the senior officers of the US army who used Dubai as a conduit. The ******** got their slice and the start of their wealth today. Much more mundane than CIA conspiracy theories.
    Well, firstly, nowhere does the OP say that heroin funds wars. Secondly, the OP doesn't rely on or refer to the short quote from Arbabzadah.
    Thirdly, what is your source for your accusation that a named family got their money from heroin? If its not good, removal of the reference is advisable.

    Have a look at the Kyrghyzstan thread. Without any effort on my part, the two threads, relying on quite different sources, came to one location.

    I much doubt that the CIA, Karzai's family, the likes of Bakiyev or the US army can any of them keep their hands off the loot.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Cork
    Posts
    2,375

    Default Re: Heroin Addiction in Afghanistan - A NATO War Crime

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Well, firstly, nowhere does the OP say that heroin funds wars. Secondly, the OP doesn't rely on or refer to the short quote from Arbabzadah.
    Thirdly, what is your source for your accusation that a named family got their money from heroin? If its not good, removal of the reference is advisable.

    Have a look at the Kyrghyzstan thread. Without any effort on my part, the two threads, relying on quite different sources, came to one location.

    I much doubt that the CIA, Karzai's family, the likes of Bakiyev or the US army can any of them keep their hands off the loot.
    I don't think the al-Maktoums will be suing you.
    brief bit on Dubai. It doesn't mention the war smuggling, but it does all the other kind plus its place at the centre of terrorist finances.
    http://www.newleftreview.org/?view=2635

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    78,847

    Default Re: Heroin Addiction in Afghanistan - A NATO War Crime

    Quote Originally Posted by Lapsedmethodist View Post
    I don't think the al-Maktoums will be suing you.
    brief bit on Dubai. It doesn't mention the war smuggling, but it does all the other kind plus its place at the centre of terrorist finances.
    http://www.newleftreview.org/?view=2635
    While I'm reading that, perhaps you would take a look at the UN report on drugs in Afghanistan.

    Right. That was a wasted 5 minutes reading ads for Gucci sunglasses. More than a little off topic, Lapsed and please redact the allegations.
    Last edited by C. Flower; 27-06-2010 at 12:42 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Cork
    Posts
    2,375

    Default Re: Heroin Addiction in Afghanistan - A NATO War Crime

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    While I'm reading that, perhaps you would take a look at the UN report on drugs in Afghanistan.

    Right. That was a wasted 5 minutes reading ads for Gucci sunglasses. More than a little off topic, Lapsed and please redact the allegations.
    **** ***.
    Last edited by C. Flower; 27-06-2010 at 12:52 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    728

    Default Re: Heroin Addiction in Afghanistan - A NATO War Crime

    Quote Originally Posted by Lapsedmethodist View Post
    From the link- Quote: Nushin Arbabzadah, writing for The Guardian, theorized that “U.S. Army planes leave Afghanistan carrying coffins empty of bodies, but filled with drugs.” Is that why the military protested so vehemently when reporters tried to photograph returning caskets? Unquote.

    Theorised. That's the operative word. Most of this CIA drugs funding wars stuff is fantasy. The Vietnam experience showed that most of the drug running was done by the senior officers of the US army who used Dubai as a conduit. ********** got their slice and the start of their wealth today. Much more mundane than CIA conspiracy theories.

    The CIA and Drugs
    Just say “Why not?”
    by William Blum
    “In my 30-year history in the Drug Enforcement Administration and related agencies, the major targets of my investigations almost invariably turned out to be working for the CIA.”
    Dennis Dayle, former chief of an elite DEA enforcement unit.{1}

    .................................................. .............................................

    A Brief History of CIA Involvement in Drug Trafficking
    1947 to 1951, France
    CIA arms, money, and disinformation enabled Corsican criminal syndicates in Marseille to wrestle control of labor unions from the Communist Party. The Corsicans gained political influence and control over the docks — ideal conditions for cementing a long-term partnership with mafia drug distributors, which turned Marseille into the postwar heroin capital of the Western world. Marseille’s first heroin laboratories were opened in 1951, only months after the Corsicans took over the waterfront.{3}
    Early 1950s, Southeast Asia
    The Nationalist Chinese army, organized by the CIA to wage war against Communist China, became the opium barons of The Golden Triangle (parts of Burma, Thailand and Laos), the world’s largest source of opium and heroin. Air America, the CIA’s principal airline proprietary, flew the drugs all over Southeast Asia.{4}
    1950s to early 1970s, Indochina
    During U.S. military involvement in Laos and other parts of Indochina, Air America flew opium and heroin throughout the area. Many GI’s in Vietnam became addicts. A laboratory built at CIA headquarters in northern Laos was used to refine heroin. After a decade of American military intervention, Southeast Asia had become the source of 70 percent of the world’s illicit opium and the major supplier of raw materials for America’s booming heroin market.{5}
    1973-80, Australia
    The Nugan Hand Bank of Sydney was a CIA bank in all but name. Among its officers were a network of US generals, admirals and CIA men, including former CIA Director William Colby, who was also one of its lawyers. With branches in Saudi Arabia, Europe, Southeast Asia, South America and the U.S., Nugan Hand Bank financed drug trafficking, money laundering and international arms dealings. In 1980, amidst several mysterious deaths, the bank collapsed, $50 million in debt.{6}
    1970s and 1980s, Panama
    For more than a decade, Panamanian strongman Manuel Noriega was a highly paid CIA asset and collaborator, despite knowledge by U.S. drug authorities as early as 1971 that the general was heavily involved in drug trafficking and money laundering. Noriega facilitated “guns-for-drugs” flights for the Contras, providing protection and pilots, as well as safe havens for drug cartel officials, and discreet banking facilities. U.S. officials, including then-CIA Director William Webster and several DEA officers, sent Noriega letters of praise for efforts to thwart drug trafficking (albeit only against competitors of his Medellin Cartel patrons). When a confluence of circumstances led to Noriega’s political luck running out, the Bush administration was reluctantly obliged to turn against him, invading Panama in December 1989, kidnapping the general, and falsely ascribing the invasion to the war on drugs. Ironically, drug trafficking through Panama was not abated after the US invasion.{7}
    1980s, Central America
    Obsessed with overthrowing the leftist Sandinista government in Nicaragua, Reagan administration officials tolerated drug trafficking as long as the traffickers gave support to the Contras. In 1989, the Senate Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics, and International Operations (the Kerry committee) concluded a three-year investigation by stating: “There was substantial evidence of drug smuggling through the war zones on the part of individual Contras, Contra suppliers, Contra pilots, mercenaries who worked with the Contras, and Contra supporters throughout the region. … U.S. officials involved in Central America failed to address the drug issue for fear of jeopardizing the war efforts against Nicaragua. … In each case, one or another agency of the U.S. government had information regarding the involvement either while it was occurring, or immediately thereafter. … Senior U.S. policy makers were not immune to the idea that drug money was a perfect solution to the Contras’ funding problems.”{8}

    http://www.capitolhillblue.com/node/13035
    Who's fantasy ?
    "History will record. . . that we were victims of the most monstrous
    frame-up of our country. . . .We die with honor and dignity - knowing
    we must be vindicated by history."
    Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, June 1953

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Share us
Follow Us