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Thread: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

  1. #1
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    Default Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    Thought about posting this in the robots thread, but AI really is a distinct issue. Accountancy firm KPMG is running this three minute AI ad on TV. When did you last see any ad that ran for three minutes "By 2020 people will be having more conversations with bots than their spouses"..........


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bx7rFXaBFmQ


    The Race for Quantum Dominance


    As the U.S. and China struggle for dominance in artificial intelligence, they are locked in a parallel, behind-the-scenes race to master quantum technology, a contest that could result in lasting military superiority and a possible new industrial revolution.


    The big picture: Though still far off, conquering quantum technology could result in uncrackable communications, supercharged radar and more deadly undersea warfare. And as of now, China has some serious advantages, Axios' Kaveh Waddell reports.


    A new report from the Center for a New American Security draws on open-source material for a window into China’s quantum progress and aspirations.



    • The report’s authors, Elsa Kania and John Costello, say that China has made substantial advances in some areas of quantum research, putting it in a position to overtake the U.S. in the science.
    • Chinese advantages include a national vision for technological research, significant investments and tight bonds between the private sector and the military. By comparison, the U.S. yet to enact a quantum policy, though the White House recently added a quantum expert to its tech-policy staff.
    • "China’s advances in quantum science could impact the future military and strategic balance, perhaps even leapfrogging traditional U.S. military-technological advantages," write Kania and Costello.




    How it works: Quantum technology capitalizes on the unusual properties of super-tiny particles to surpass what's possible with normal, or "classical," computing.
    Among its applications:



    • Quantum cryptography, a leap over current techniques that would be nearly impossible to crack — and render modern encryption obsolete.
    • Quantum computing, which promises to enormously accelerate computing, a breakthrough whose effects would be felt across the economy.



    Kania and Costello argue that Chinese progress on quantum cryptography is world-class, demonstrated by the launch of the first-ever quantum satellite in 2016. And while China lags on research into quantum computing, it’s quickly catching up.


    What's next? Quantum supremacy — the moment when quantum computers will be more capable than classical ones — is still well out of reach, but researchers in both countries are pushing aggressively in that direction.


    Why it matters: Among the spoils of conquering the quantum space are computers that could decipher most of the world’s encrypted data, like the NSA’s store of intercepted communications, and overcome the U.S. stealth technologies on which the military heavily relies.


    How they got here: China had a "Sputnik moment" in 2013, igniting a national plan that funnels billions of dollars and top scientists into quantum research, the authors write.



    • Its unlikely instigator was Edward Snowden, whose leaks revealed the extent of U.S. spying in China, and sparked a feverish response meant to shore up China’s protections against cyber espionage.
    • This inflection point mirrors another instigator in 2016: An Obama administration report outlining a future U.S. artificial intelligence policy. Afterward, Beijing scrambled to put together its own, far outstripping American planning, while the Trump administration has neither engaged Obama's policy nor formulated its own.



    In a series of policy recommendations, Kania and Costello say the U.S. needs to initiate a plan that ensures quantum research is well-funded and attracts top scientists from around the world.



    • The U.S. should also closely monitor the research of rival countries to avoid an adversary quietly decrypting sensitive military communications — like the U.K. did in World War II, using Alan Turing's Enigma codebreaker.



    Go deeper: The race to build a quantum economy


    Henry Kissinger says we're failing to reckon with the consequences of the AI revolution — and that when he "organized a number of informal dialogues on the subject" (it's great to be Henry Kissinger), his concernsgrew.


    Kissinger, 95, wrote in the June issue of The Atlantic that "[p]hilosophically, intellectually  —  in every way  —  human society is unprepared for the rise of artificial intelligence." The Atlantic has resurfaced the piece on Medium:



    • The key paragraph: "If AI learns exponentially faster than humans, we must expect it to accelerate, also exponentially, the trial-and-error process by which human decisions are generally made: to make mistakes faster and of greater magnitude than humans do."
    • "It may be impossible to temper those mistakes, as researchers in AI often suggest, by including in a program caveats requiring 'ethical' or 'reasonable' outcomes. Entire academic disciplines have arisen out of humanity’s inability to agree upon how to define these terms. Should AI therefore become their arbiter?"



    "Ultimately, the term artificial intelligence may be a misnomer," Kissinger writes:



    • "Rather, it is unprecedented memorization and computation."
    • "AI is likely to win any game assigned to it. But for our purposes as humans, the games are not only about winning; they are about thinking."
    • "By treating a mathematical process as if it were a thought process, ... we are in danger of losing the capacity that has been the essence of human cognition."



    Obviously worthy of your time.

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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    The new age of automation is building global momentum much faster than many thought, with more than half of the division of labor on pace to switch to machines in just seven years, according to a report released today.


    Why it matters: Earlier this month, we reported that the impact of artificial intelligence is happening only slowly, but will pick up to a rapid clip in the late 2020s. But with automation, we are already there, according to a report by the Geneva-based World Economic Forum.



    • Examining large companies in 20 advanced and developing economies, the report said that by 2022, machines will carry out 42% of the labor — and an accelerated 52% just three years later.
    • That's up from a 29% automated share last year.
    • The people, employers and governments in these countries have barely begun planning the fundamental reordering of work, education and society needed to absorb this coming new blow to the global system.




    The findings align generally with a slew of reports released the last two years by Western think tanks and companies.


    "Mass redeployment in labor forces around the world, including reskilling/retraining (rather than mass unemployment), is one of the societal grand challenges in the next several decades," said Michael Chui, who has led numerous automation studies for the McKinsey Global Institute.


    In the U.S., there is only embryonic discussion underway. In an event today, President Trump spoke at the inaugural meeting of his National Council for the American Worker, which he established in July to begin planning how to retrain workers for the future economy.


    Meanwhile automation is already happening fast — 75 million workers could lose their jobs to automation by 2022, the World Economic Forum report said. If those workers are given "significant" reskilling, and a pipeline of new workers is created in schools and colleges, companies could create 133 million new jobs by 2022 — more than compensating for those that vanish, the report says. By "significant," the report means an average of 101 days of retraining, a little over three months.



    • But the operative phrase is "if," says Saadia Zahidi, the study's lead author and head of the forum's Center for New Economy and Society.
    • The future job forecastis based on a conceptual idea of new skills that, if learned by a single person, could result in a new occupation.If such skills are compounded out, the economy could have a slew of new emerging occupations."But they won't emerge if we don't give people the right skills," Zahidi said.



    The bottom line: A primary finding is that every part of the work chain — labor, companies and government — will have to step up to head off a dangerous disruption. For workers, this is because two-thirds of the companies said they would provide retraining only for their highest-skill talent, Zahidi said. That will leave the rest of the workforce on its own.



    • One reason: No company has the money to reskill all its vulnerable workers, Zahidi said.
    • An option, in addition to the government stepping in, is for companies to pool their resources for reskilling "if competitive factors can be put aside," she said.


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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    amid the ripples of AI
    Reproduced from LinkedIn; Chart: Axios Visuals
    Early shudders of AI-driven automation are already palpable in the job market, with work that requires a human touch flourishing and routine jobs slipping away, according to data from LinkedIn.
    Why it matters: With significant upheaval still years down the road, this is the time to prepare for the AI revolution, as discussed above, Axios' Kaveh Waddell reports.
    The details: To determine how demand has changed over the past five years, LinkedIn examined its trove of data on jobs and job seekers, comparing hiring by profession with all its job postings.

    • The chart above shows the average annual change for the fastest-moving fields.

    The outcome is as experts have long predicted. LinkedIn found that jobs requiring interpersonal skills (HR workers, recruiters, and real estate agents) are growing, while jobs relying on skills that can be automated (administrative assistants, accountants, customer-service reps) are shrinking.
    But, but, but: Not all the job shrinkage was due to automation. Journalists and editors — alas! — are on the out-and-out not because their jobs are being taken by robots (yet), but because the news business as a whole has not landed on a lucrative financial model in the internet age.
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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    The next generation of mobile networks will make or break the big tech ideas of the future, allowing them to be field-tested at scale, and checked off as a revolution or a dud.


    Why it matters: Autonomous vehicles, smart homes, smart cities, "internet of things" devices, virtual and augmented reality — 5G will carry this raft of new technologies out of the labs and into our streets and homes, weaving the internet into daily life.


    Between the lines: Yes, 5G will mean faster data on phones. But it will also pave the way for billions of connected devices — everything from sensors that can measure water levels to surgery done remotely over the internet.


    5G offers three upgrades to its predecessor, today's 4G (or LTE) networks:

    1. Minimal delay, or low latency, for real-time applications like gaming or remote piloting.
    2. Long battery life, for those days when you can't find a charger — and for devices that need to sit untended in the field.
    3. High speeds, for no-wait viewing of high-definition video and transfers of enormous hunks of data.



    The big picture: 5G will take a long time to roll out. It's as easy to overestimate this transformation in the near term as it is to underestimate its impact over five to 10 years — just as, 10 years ago, it was hard to believe that the last generations of network-tech upgrades would make streaming anywhere, navigation everywhere, ride sharing, and mobile transactions our new normal.


    What’s next: In the same way that 4G led to a never-forecast world of Uber, Spotify, and Square, we don’t know what new companies and services 5G will inspire.

    • And the providers don’t care. They’ve learned that their job is to keep creating new technical realities that entrepreneurs and engineers will inevitably explore and exploit.

    The bottom line: Last time around, the arrival of a new network generation moved the internet off our desktops and into our palms and pockets. This time, it will transform the network from something we carry around to something that carries us around.





    The first 5G-ready smartphones won't arrive until 2019.

    • That means this year's efforts will be a mix of portable hotspots and "fixed wireless" — that is, using cellular networks to offer an alternative to wires for home broadband.

    Between the lines: While all of the Big 4 carriers plan to offer 5G mobile cell service in the first half of next year — and each is making the case they will be first — each is taking a different path.

    • AT&T will offer 5G-powered mobile hotspots in a dozen cities this year before likely rolling out phones in the first half of next year.
    • Verizon plans 5G service in at least 5 cities this year — not for mobile phones but for fixed wireless.
    • Sprint owns some unique airwaves that it hopes will give it an advantage as it works on eventually rolling out smartphone service in 9 U.S. cities.
    • T-Mobile says it plans to offer 5G smartphone service next year to customers in New York, Los Angeles, Dallas and Las Vegas.
    • Sprint and T-Mobile say their proposed merger, which is still awaiting regulatory approval, will accelerate their 5G efforts.

    Globally, the picture is more mixed:

    • China's early investments could help spur earlier economies of scale in the global 5G device market. But in Europe, concerns remain about the business case for 5G, with investment coming more slowly.

    Reality check: Even after 5G is more widely available, many devices will still rely on 4G for roaming outside of 5G coverage areas. Research firm Strategy Analytics projects that by 2023, only 6.5% of global wireless subscriptions will be 5G, while 70% will be 4G.




    The advent of 5G has turned into a serious geopolitical fight — actually, two.
    Fight #1: The race to get 5G networks up and running.

    • It's a three-way game right now among the U.S., China, and South Korea.
    • While the U.S. may be technically first with 5G in a few places, China is spending significantly more and will likely be first with 5G en masse.

    Fight #2: The competition over whose technology will power the networks.

    • U.S. security concerns about Chinese equipment have loomed large: The U.S. won't allow Huawei to supply gear to major U.S. telecom firms, favoring European players Ericsson and Nokia (as well as Korea's Samsung).
    • These concerns prompted some Trump administration officials to ponder earlier this year whether the country needed to nationalize the 5G effort, though that idea was flawed and faded fast.

    Be smart: The U.S. has no major cellular network equipment makers. Chipmaker Qualcomm is the biggest American player in the underlying 5G technology.

    • Why it matters: Being first brings the opportunity to take the lead with the kinds of never-before-possible apps that exploit a new generation of network capabilities. For example, in being first with 4G, the U.S. was able to lead the way with services like Uber and Snapchat.

    Go deeper:



    If you think today's cybersecurity landscape is treacherous, just wait. There are dimensions to security in the 5G age that no one, including the experts, has quite figured out yet, Joe Uchill writes.
    The "Internet of Things" problem: Devices for automating your home favor low prices over strong security, making them easy picking for hackers.

    • People secure those devices today by buying additional products to monitor home-network traffic.
    • But with 5G, many more devices will bypass that network and connect directly to the internet.
    • The problem isn't one hacked toaster — it's millions of controllable hijacked gizmos.

    Data overload: The growth in connected devices also means an unimaginable amount of data will now be stored with every consumer.

    • Expect enormous privacy controversies. Who knows what kinds of data a new universe of smart bathroom products will collect or sell to advertisers?
    • The data explosion will also demand a rapid increase in cloud securityin industries that haven’t much needed it in the past.

    Go deeper: Read the full story.




    The first to invest in and take advantage of 5G will be heavy industries, not consumer brands, Kia Kokalitcheva writes.

    • Oil fields, for example, could use the tech to boost their collection of data from sensors, says Lux Capital partner Bilal Zuberi.
    • Other applications could include manufacturing (automotive, electronics, and even textiles), and agriculture, such as using sensors to monitor crops or livestock, says Promus Ventures partner Gareth Keane.
    • Companies working on self-driving tech will look to use 5G in their development, as it can help take some load off the cars’ computers.

    Investment in consumer-related 5G applications will take a lot longer.

    • People tend to be satisfied with today's mature 4G networks, and some experts are skeptical that there will be wide demand for 5G as a simple upgrade for existing uses.
    • For consumers, 5G will need its own “killer app” — something they want badly to do with their phones that the old network won't support, says Stacey Higginbotham, a journalist and expert on 5G and connectivity tech.

    Read the full story.



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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    A tour de force Count.

    However, there are other viewpoints. For example, the Finns, who were the earliest adopters of the mobile phone, have started experimenting with a base "wage" being paid to everyone, even if they have no job. Not sure where it will lead but those people might just become placid consumers, or sharp well educated, reactors to being over governed by AI...??

    Quantum computing is an interesting concept, but requires very specialised facilities. It reminds me of the 'cold fusion' fuss,in theory if could happen, in practise it is tricky.

    Yes there are plenty of reports by thinkers (even Kissinger, didn't he work with Nixon?) but practitioners, such as chemists, who see QT as a means of exploring catalysts, have found the reality more difficult to use.

    It is interesting that we recently had, in Dublin, a commemoration of Schrodinger, one of the fathers of quantum thinking.
    Last edited by barrym; 23-09-2018 at 07:34 AM.

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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    Quote Originally Posted by barrym View Post
    A tour de force Count.

    However, there are other viewpoints. For example, the Finns, who were the earliest adopters of the mobile phone, have started experimenting with a base "wage" being paid to everyone, even if they have no job. Not sure where it will lead but those people might just become placid consumers, or sharp well educated, reactors to being over governed by AI...??

    Quantum computing is an interesting concept, but requires very specialised facilities. It reminds me of the 'cold fusion' fuss,in theory if could happen, in practise it is tricky.

    Yes there are plenty of reports by thinkers (even Kissinger, didn't he work with Nixon?) but practitioners, such as chemists, who see QT as a means of exploring catalysts, have found the reality more difficult to use.

    It is interesting that we recently had, in Dublin, a commemoration of Schrodinger, one of the fathers of quantum thinking.
    Thx.barry.

    Finland is calling it quits next year on the basic income experiment.
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...fter-two-years

    When the 1st 3G iPhone became available in 2008, Nokia who had a 40% global mobile share all but disappeared.
    https://www.theatlantic.com/business...nymore/279337/
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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    Drive.ai — a startup developing an on-demand autonomous shuttle service — is based in Silicon Valley but has deployed its first vans in Texas, drawn in by the state’s favorable regulations.
    Without a national regulatory framework for autonomous vehicles, states have become laboratories not just for the technology itself but also for the rules emerging to shape it, Axios' Kaveh Waddell and Kia Kokalitcheva report.

    • Their efforts will decide which Americans get to hitch a ride in an autonomous car first — and which cities will reap the potential economic benefits of self-driving vehicles, along with any problems.

    The big picture: Federal legislation that would create national parameters for testing and deploying AVs passed the House but is stalled in the Senate, leaving states to create their own rules for now. Automakers worry that without federal standards they'll have to deal with a patchwork of state laws that would hamper a broader roll-out of the technology.
    That leaves companies shopping for testbeds among the states. Currently, 29 states have passed some kind of regulation for self-driving cars, some more extensive than others.

    • For Drive.ai, Texas strikes a Goldilocks medium between highly regulated states like California and those with lax rules, like Arizona, CEO Sameep Tandon says.
    • Waymo, Uber and GM Cruise are testing in states like California and Pennsylvania where they're located and can experience urban environments.
    • Others are operating in Arizona and Florida, where lighter regulations make it easier to test and deploy ride services.
    • Testing is also determined by weather, not just regulations, National Conference of State Legislature’s Douglas Shinkle points out. So far, much of it takes place in warmer, sunnier climates like California, Nevada, Texas and Florida, where conditions are easier for today's AVs to navigate.

    As companies get closer to deploying self-driving cars that can be available to the public, state rules around consumer transportation will be even more important.

    • “Commercial deployment is the next big battleground in AV regulations,” says Greg Rogers of Securing America’s Future Energy.

    Yes, but: Some experts argue that self-driving safety regulation should really be done at the federal level.

    • “You should be able to buy a car in California and drive it to New York,” Rogers says, adding that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is best equipped to do this.

    Go deeper: Read the entire story.
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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    How self-driving cars can talk to humans

    Ford's John Shutko writes for Axios ... One challenge for self-driving cars is how to communicate with the human beings around them, including drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. To do this safely, autonomous vehicles need a shared, easy-to-understand visual language to communicate their intent.


    The big picture: There is currently no industry standard governing this communication. Automakers and tech companies must come together to create one, since a variety of conflicting light and color signals could cause widespread confusion and distrust.


    Where it stands: There are a number of possible approaches to such a standardized communication system, from flashing lights that indicate acceleration to a solid white light that shows active driving.



    • Ford has tested an initial design — a white light bar across the top of the windshield that projects three different signals of intention — in both virtual reality and the real world with Virginia Tech Transportation Institute.




    • Any method used should be as simple as a brake light or turn signal flash, which can be understood easily around the world. Text messages, for example, are a poor choice because of language barriers.




    • Regulators may also play a part, as federal requirements would preclude light colors other than amber or white on the front of the vehicle, a standard aligned with international conventions. (Ford's light bar meets the current guidelines.)



    Go deeper: Ford's call for an industry standard
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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    Lost amid the difficulties Tesla has had ramping up production of its mass-market Model 3, along with other distractions, is that they've squandered an early lead in autonomous technology.
    Now Tesla is in the rare position of playing catch-up. On Twitter overnight, CEO Elon Musk acknowledged self-driving is "extremely difficult" and their technology needs more work.
    Why it matters: Musk’s ambitious vision to lead the planet toward sustainable energy and safer cars can’t be achieved unless Tesla is financially viable.
    Tesla got off track after introducing new Autopilot 2.0 hardware in October 2016 and parting ways with technology partner Mobileye.

    • The company promised it would restore Autopilot safety technology by December and then gradually roll out new features — eventually leading up to “fully self-driving capability.”
    • But it has taken much longer than expected for Tesla to get the software right.
    • Complicating the effort, they're trying to develop a microprocessor to replace the Nvidia chip they currently use.

    Where it stands: After two years, today's Autopilot is barely on par with 2016's original system. Yet customers have been paying up to $8,000 extra for Autopilot 2.0 without getting promised features, which is why Tesla offered to reimburse some of their costs to settle a class action lawsuitbrought in 2017.
    What's new: For the first time, Tesla shared safety stats on Thursday that showed it registered one accident (or near-miss) for every 3.34 million miles driven with Autopilot engaged, compared to one event for every 1.92 million miles driven without Autopilot.

    • Overall, government data shows there's an automobile crash every 492,000 miles.

    The big picture: Autopilot is making driving safer, but it is far from being a fully self-driving system. Nor is Tesla the only game in town anymore. Other automakers are rolling out their own semi-automated features, some that go beyond what Tesla currently offers.

    • GM's Cadillac Super Cruise is the only truly hands-off system (for highway driving only). Others, including Tesla's Autopilot, require the driver to touch the wheel periodically.
    • The Mercedes S-Class' Intelligent Drive system can change lanes automatically when the driver taps the turn signal, something Tesla is still working on.
    • Other systems like the 2019 Lincoln Nautilis' Co-pilot 360 and Audi's Traffic Jam Pilot feature things like adaptive cruise control, automatic emergency braking and lane keeping assistance.
    • Partnerships are popping up everywhere, like Waymo's deals to install AV technology on Chrysler minivans and Jaguar I-Pace crossovers, or Honda's tie-up with GM Cruise to develop autonomous vehicles for global markets.

    Go deeper: Read the full story here.





    Zero crashes, zero emissions and zero congestion — this is General Motors’ vision, CEO Mary Barra writes for Axios. These potential benefits of self-driving technology can only be fully realized when self-driving cars are deployed in large numbers, and when riders feel comfortable and secure.


    What's needed: Federal legislation would provide a path for manufacturers to put self-driving vehicles on the roads safely, while allowing continued innovation. Current federal law prohibits deployment of self-driving vehicles without steering wheels and other conventional driver controls. And other regulations for self-driving cars vary from state to state.


    Why it matters: Every year, crashes claim the lives of approximately 1.2 million people around the world — about 40,000 of them in the U.S. And 94% of traffic crashes in the U.S. are caused by human error. Because self-driving vehicles do not operate impaired, tired or distracted, they offer a compelling solution. And when self-driving vehicles are electric, they will help to accelerate the transition to sustainable energy.


    What to watch: The SELF DRIVE Act, passed by the House of Representatives, and the AV START Act, pending in the Senate, would direct the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to issue new and revised safety regulations on an expedited basis. The bills would allow safe self-driving deployment during the period between enactment and NHTSA’s issuance of new regulations, but only by manufacturers that prove their self-driving cars are as safe as human drivers.


    The bottom line: Transitioning to a self-driving society will take time, and will require cooperation and collaboration by the private and public sectors. Federal legislation is essential to enabling the journey.


    An autonomous solution to phantom traffic jams


    Adaptive cruise control (ACC), which holds a vehicle's speed steady while maintaining a safe distance from traffic ahead, is now a feature in 16 of the 20 bestselling vehicles in the U.S., classifying them as level-1 AVs, Vanderbilt University's Daniel Work writes for Axios.


    Why it matters: Phantom traffic jams — the ones that appear to have no obvious cause — result from human driving behavior. ACC replaces some of these jam-inducing behaviors with algorithms, using sensors to detect the vehicle ahead and adjust cruise speed accordingly.


    Level-1 AVs hold promise for traffic jam reduction because the vehicles can follow their driving rules faithfully and consistently.



    • Driving tests performed on a closed track in Arizona using 1 research-grade autonomous car and 19 human-driven ones suggested that replacing even 5% of the traffic flow with AVs could significantly cut phantom traffic jams, reducing variance in traffic speed 50%–80%.
    • Another test at Ford’s Michigan proving grounds showed that ACC reduced the impact of a temporary slowdown. The ACC vehicles were able to maintain a higher speed through the slowdown than the human-driven ones.



    Yes, but: A limitation of the current technology is that it can respond only to the vehicle directly ahead, whereas the best human drivers can take in information about many nearby vehicles.

    What’s next: More testing is needed to determine how consistently commercially available level-1 AVs will stack up against human drivers. But to surpass human driving capabilities, these systems will need vehicle communication technologies that enable them to respond to more vehicles around them.
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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    By year's end, anyone in metro Phoenix (not just a handful of early participants) will be able to summon an autonomous vehicle from Waymo using an app on their phone. The nation’s first commercial robo-taxi service will be limited to certain areas, but the territory will gradually expand as the cars get even smarter with experience.


    Why it matters: Waymo is by far the leader in autonomous vehicle technology, racking up 10 million miles of real-world driving and 5 billion simulated miles. But it’s still up to the public to decide if they want self-driving cars. Waymo’s robo-taxi service will be an early test of that question.


    What we’re watching: It’s unlikely we’ll see any movement on federal legislation around AVs this year, unless Congress decides to tackle it during a lame duck session after the November election, which means companies will continue to focus their development efforts in states with the most favorable laws. — Joann Muller
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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    These examples are all very well, but another consequence of AI and quantum computing (btw, I don't think they are entirely comparable) is longevity, prompted by t cell and other quantum based research. It is widely accepted that today's newborns will live to 100+. There are huge social/political consequences to that.

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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    btw Count, I think the Finn's are only reassessing their approach to a wage for all, not abandoning it. The Swedes, Dane's, and others, are also studying it.

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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    Quote Originally Posted by barrym View Post
    btw Count, I think the Finn's are only reassessing their approach to a wage for all, not abandoning it. The Swedes, Dane's, and others, are also studying it.
    Yup, the 64 million dollar question is what to do with the excess population when you've no profitable work to give them other than using them to consume whatever it is you want to sell.

    If you kill them off you're shrinking the market. A wage for all certainly would allow societies to get around that problem but it's a bit too communist-like for the money men to buy into it.

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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    Quote Originally Posted by barrym View Post
    These examples are all very well, but another consequence of AI and quantum computing (btw, I don't think they are entirely comparable) is longevity, prompted by t cell and other quantum based research. It is widely accepted that today's newborns will live to 100+. There are huge social/political consequences to that.
    Agree on the distinction between AI and QC, it was for convenience here. Most industrial/social revolutions have created more jobs than they destroyed. Just different jobs. I agree the issue is not without its challenges, but I take the view that the future is brighter than the past, and since you can't stop the future from coming, better to embrace than reject. It's the American way, and I refuse to engage in "Un-American Activities".
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: Artificial Intelligence & Quantum Computing

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaadi View Post
    Yup, the 64 million dollar question is what to do with the excess population when you've no profitable work to give them other than using them to consume whatever it is you want to sell.

    If you kill them off you're shrinking the market. A wage for all certainly would allow societies to get around that problem but it's a bit too communist-like for the money men to buy into it.
    People living to 100 will have longer productive working lives, and will contribute economically to society for longer. 75-80 will become the new retirement age. You can see it already with the raising of retirement ages to 67 and above in several countries.
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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