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Thread: “Lying is second nature to Trump." -- Tony Schwartz

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    Default “Lying is second nature to Trump." -- Tony Schwartz

    “Lying is second nature to him. More than anyone else I have ever met, Trump has the ability to convince himself that whatever he is saying at any given moment is true, or sort of true, or at least ought to be true.” -- Tony Schwartz, regretting ghostwriting for Donald Trump

    “He (Trump) lied strategically. He had a complete lack of conscience about it.” -- Tony Schwartz

    1. Mary Papenfuss reported that "other than soybeans, agricultural products are off the table, the European Commission says." The following is full text of Mary Papenfuss's July 27, 2018 news report headlined "Trump Boasted To Farmers He Opened European Market. Europe: No, He Didn’t." at https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry...b0de86f4974cd2

    (Begin text)
    President Donald Trump said in Iowa on Thursday that he just opened up the European market to U.S. farmers. One problem: Europe disagrees.

    “We’re opening things up,” Trump said in Dubuque (video above). “But the biggest one of all happened yesterday ... the EU .... We just opened up Europe for you farmers. You’re not going to be too angry with Trump, I can tell you. You were essentially restricted. You had barriers that really made it impossible for farm products to go in ... you have just gotten yourself one big market that really essentially never existed.”

    The European Union’s take was very different.

    “On agriculture, I think we’ve been very clear on that — that agriculture is out of the scope of these discussions,” European Commission spokeswoman Mina Andreeva told reporters in Brussels on Friday, The Wall Street Journal reported. Other than what is “explicitly mentioned” in the agreement, “we are not negotiating about agricultural products,” she said.

    When you read the joint statement ... you will see no mention of agriculture as such; you will see a mention of farmers and a mention of soybeans, which are part of the discussions, and we will follow up [on] that,” Andreeva added.

    Trump’s boast appears to be an overselling of the agreement he reached with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, which was announced at the White House on Wednesday. The men agreed to a truce in the confrontation over trade while the two sides negotiate toward common goals. Those include “zero tariffs” and to “reduce barriers and increase trade in services, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, medical products, as well as soybeans.”

    Trump hailed it as a “breakthrough agreement,” while Juncker said it was a “good and instructive meeting.”

    The U.S. “heavily insisted to insert the whole field of agricultural products” in the negotiations, Juncker later told reporters, according to the Journal. “We refused that because I don’t have a mandate and that’s a very sensitive issue in Europe.”

    But U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer told a Senate committee Thursday that “we are negotiating about agriculture, period.”

    In Dubuque, Trump described the agreement as “no tariffs, no nothing, free trade.” He said he told the Europeans: “Do me a favor: Would you go out to the farms in Iowa ... would you buy a lot of soybeans right now?” (End text)

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...iter-tells-all
    Last edited by reedak; 12-08-2018 at 08:28 PM.
    "Now FBI has to sieve through all tweets and rally speeches by Trump for any 'China, if you're listening' remark." -- Reedak

    "What happens when you're confronted with a politician (Trump) who is utterly without shame? You can reveal where he's lied, explain all the facts, and try as hard as you can to inoculate the public against his falsehoods. But by the time you've done that, he has already told 10 more lies." -- Paul Waldman

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    Default Re: “Lying is second nature to Trump." -- Tony Schwartz

    2. The following is full text of the "Joint U.S.-EU Statement following President Juncker's visit to the White House". It was issued by the European Commission in Washington on 25 July 2018.

    (Begin text)
    We met today in Washington, D.C. to launch a new phase in the relationship between the United States and the European Union – a phase of close friendship, of strong trade relations in which both of us will win, of working better together for global security and prosperity, and of fighting jointly against terrorism.

    The United States and the European Union together count more than 830 million citizens and more than 50 percent of global GDP. If we team up, we can make our planet a better, more secure, and more prosperous place.

    Already today, the United States and the European Union have a $1 trillion bilateral trade relationship – the largest economic relationship in the world. We want to further strengthen this trade relationship to the benefit of all American and European citizens.

    This is why we agreed today, first of all, to work together toward zero tariffs, zero non-tariff barriers, and zero subsidies on non-auto industrial goods. We will also work to reduce barriers and increase trade in services, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, medical products, as well as soybeans.

    This will open markets for farmers and workers, increase investment, and lead to greater prosperity in both the United States and the European Union. It will also make trade fairer and more reciprocal.

    Secondly, we agreed today to strengthen our strategic cooperation with respect to energy. The European Union wants to import more liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the United States to diversify its energy supply.

    Thirdly, we agreed today to launch a close dialogue on standards in order to ease trade, reduce bureaucratic obstacles, and slash costs.

    Fourthly, we agreed today to join forces to protect American and European companies better from unfair global trade practices. We will therefore work closely together with like-minded partners to reform the WTO and to address unfair trading practices, including intellectual property theft, forced technology transfer, industrial subsidies, distortions created by state owned enterprises, and overcapacity.

    We decided to set up immediately an Executive Working Group of our closest advisors to carry this joint agenda forward. In addition, it will identify short-term measures to facilitate commercial exchanges and assess existing tariff measures. While we are working on this, we will not go against the spirit of this agreement, unless either party terminates the negotiations.

    We also want to resolve the steel and aluminum tariff issues and retaliatory tariffs. (End text)

    P.S. Please note what European Commission spokeswoman Mina Andreeva told reporters in Brussels on Friday, July 27, 2018: “When you read the joint statement ... you will see no mention of agriculture as such; you will see a mention of farmers and a mention of soybeans, which are part of the discussions, and we will follow up [on] that.”

    Source: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release...18-4687_en.htm
    Last edited by reedak; 12-08-2018 at 09:03 PM.
    "Now FBI has to sieve through all tweets and rally speeches by Trump for any 'China, if you're listening' remark." -- Reedak

    "What happens when you're confronted with a politician (Trump) who is utterly without shame? You can reveal where he's lied, explain all the facts, and try as hard as you can to inoculate the public against his falsehoods. But by the time you've done that, he has already told 10 more lies." -- Paul Waldman

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    Default Re: “Lying is second nature to Trump." -- Tony Schwartz

    3. Paul Waldman is a senior writer with The American Prospect magazine and a blogger for The Washington Post. His writing has appeared in dozens of newspapers, magazines, and web sites, and he is the author or co-author of four books on media and politics.

    The following are excerpts from his March 10, 2016 article headlined "Why Donald Trump's brazen lies overwhelm the press" at http://theweek.com/articles/611581/w...verwhelm-press

    (Begin excerpts)
    ...there are liars, and then there's Donald Trump. He may have an inflated opinion of himself, but when it comes to lying, the man has truly reached a level no one else can approach.

    If you've watched Trump at all, you've probably had this experience: First he says something outlandish ("If we negotiated the price of drugs, we'd save $300 billion a year"), and you think "That can't possibly be true." Then he moves on to something even more bizarre ("We have the highest taxes anywhere in the world"), and you say, "Now I know that's not true." But he keeps going, offering one ridiculous and false claim after another, until you're left shaking your head in wonder.

    Trump's lies come in many different forms. Some are those that are clearly wrong, and which it's almost certain he knows are wrong, as when he says The Art of the Deal is "the number one selling business book of all time" (not even close). Some are things he seems to have heard somewhere that are false; of course, repeating such a story doesn't become an intentional lie until you know it's false but insist it's true. That's the case with things like Trump's bogus story about thousands of Muslims celebrating the fall of the Twin Towers on rooftops in Jersey City, or with his repeated story that the 9/11 hijackers sent their wives and girlfriends back to Saudi Arabia from the U.S. two days before the attacks (only two of the 19 hijackers were married, one had a girlfriend, and none of those three were in the United States). Others might be put down to being just wild exaggerations, as when he claims that all the polls show him beating Hillary Clinton in a general election (nope).

    But the sheer volume of Trump's lies may, paradoxically, protect him from the kind of condemnation he ought to be getting. His unique style was on majestic display at the press conference he gave Tuesday night after another round of primaries, in which he set out to defend himself against Mitt Romney's charge that many of his branding ventures — like Trump Steaks, Trump Vodka, and Trump Magazine — have gone out of business.

    It was complete with visual displays as phony as Trump's claims. Romney "talked about the water company" said Trump, showing his fantastic, luxurious water. But Romney said nothing about a water company, and it appears that Trump's water is made by this company in Connecticut, and then they slap a "Trump" label on it and sell it at his resorts.

    "We have Trump Steaks," he said, pointing to a platter full of steaks that had been brought out for the occasion. But Trump Steaks have been off the market for a decade; the steaks at the press conference were still in wrappers indicating they came from a meat company called Bush Brothers.

    "We have Trump Magazine," Trump said, holding up not the actual Trump Magazine, which stopped publishing in 2009, but something called The Jewel of Palm Beach, which he apparently has printed up and passed out to promote his Mar-a-Lago resort. "He mentioned Trump Vodka," Trump said, going on to explain how he owns a working winery (actually true!), but not saying anything about the vodka, which indeed went bust in 2011 (Jonathan Ellis explains all this, with pictures).

    What should reporters do when they're confronted with this kind of blizzard of baloney? There aren't any easy answers. Though some publications employ fact checkers who pick out certain claims they think are meaningful enough to investigate at length, if you're covering a Trump rally or press conference and you decide to explain all the things he said that were false, that would make up the entirety of your story and there would be no time or space to address anything else.

    And if a reporter for a major news organization described this matter accurately — that Trump is an unusually enthusiastic liar whose falsehoods come in such quantity that they're difficult to keep up with — she'd be accused of abandoning her objectivity.

    The real genius of Trump's mendacity lies in its brazenness. One of the assumptions behind the fact-checking enterprise is that politicians are susceptible to being shamed: If they lie, you can expose the lie and then they'll be less likely to repeat it. After all, nobody wants to be tarred as a liar. But what happens when you're confronted with a politician who is utterly without shame? You can reveal where he's lied, explain all the facts, and try as hard as you can to inoculate the public against his falsehoods. But by the time you've done that, he has already told 10 more lies.

    "A little hyperbole never hurts," Trump wrote in The Art of the Deal. "People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular." He seems to believe that what matters isn't the truth, but whether you lie with enough bravado. And so far, he's largely getting away with it. (End excerpts)
    Last edited by reedak; 12-08-2018 at 09:11 PM.
    "Now FBI has to sieve through all tweets and rally speeches by Trump for any 'China, if you're listening' remark." -- Reedak

    "What happens when you're confronted with a politician (Trump) who is utterly without shame? You can reveal where he's lied, explain all the facts, and try as hard as you can to inoculate the public against his falsehoods. But by the time you've done that, he has already told 10 more lies." -- Paul Waldman

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    Default Re: “Lying is second nature to Trump." -- Tony Schwartz

    4. Jack Holmes is Associate Editor for News & Politics at Esquire.com, where he writes daily and edits the Politics Blog with Charles P. Pierce. He also does a dash of sports and some feature writing. His work has appeared in New York magazine and The Daily Beast.

    The following are excerpts from Jack Holmes' June 15, 2018 article headlined "This Is the Quintessential Trump Lie" with subheading "Shameless, easily verifiable, and rooted in the notion that imaginary people are telling him things".

    (Begin excerpts)
    This is truly a vintage Trumpian lie. As many have pointed out already, assuming the parents of a Korean War veteran were 18 when they were born, those parents would be a minimum of 101 years old today. More likely, they'd be at least 110. The idea that multiple 110-year-old people came up to Donald Trump on the campaign trail to ask him to bring home the remains of their son killed on North Korean soil 63 years prior is just absurd. It's a stirring story, a noble enough sentiment, and, in this case, completely nuts. The president is just saying things again.

    In that way, this is a quintessential Trumpian lie: totally shameless, easily verifiable as false, and rooted in the notion that "many people"—who are never defined further, and who you'll never be able to find—are telling the president something that he just happens to agree with himself. How many times in this troubled period in our nation's history have we heard how "many people are saying" something about Donald Trump?

    The possibly more worrying thing here is that there was not all that much to immediately gain from the lie, while the related issue was already sort of a victory for the president. It points to the lying being a truly pathological issue, an instinctive mode of operation for a dangerously impulsive man. It's not breaking any new ground to say it, but this is a problematic attribute for the leader of the world's most powerful country. (End excerpts)

    Source: https://www.esquire.com/news-politic...r-parents-lie/
    "Now FBI has to sieve through all tweets and rally speeches by Trump for any 'China, if you're listening' remark." -- Reedak

    "What happens when you're confronted with a politician (Trump) who is utterly without shame? You can reveal where he's lied, explain all the facts, and try as hard as you can to inoculate the public against his falsehoods. But by the time you've done that, he has already told 10 more lies." -- Paul Waldman

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