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Thread: 70 Years On - Slaughter of Palestinians at Israel Border Protest and US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem

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    Default 70 Years On - Slaughter of Palestinians at Israel Border Protest and US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem

    Today more than 50 people, including children, were shot dead by Israeli troops in protests on the Gaza-Israeli border against the loss of their
    land 70 years ago, with the establishment of the Israeli State. Over 1,500 are reported wounded/damaged today. This has followed many deaths and injuries in the past week of protests. Tomorrow is the anniversary of the foundation of the state.
    .
    Hamas is leading the protests. The desperation of the protestors may be put down to the very desperate conditions that have been created in Gaza, which is virtually a concentration camp state, at this stage

    View from the Gaza side of the border - https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/13/w...ans-fence.html

    and from the other
    side..
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/14/w...mid=tw-nytimes
    Last edited by C. Flower; 14-05-2018 at 05:39 PM.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: 70 Years On - Slaughter of Palestinians at Israel Border Protest and US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem

    Over 2,000 Palestinians wounded, according to MSF, on the ground. No Israelis injured. Gunshots to the legs and central body. Some may be hit by tear gas canisters - not clear about this.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: 70 Years On - Slaughter of Palestinians at Israel Border Protest and US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem

    "They were unleashing violence against a fence" https://www.ft.com/content/2ac13bec-...ime=1526317603
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: 70 Years On - Slaughter of Palestinians at Israel Border Protest and US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem

    90% of Gaza's drinking water is contaminated, it is the most densely populated State in the world. There are one milliion children there, which is a quarter of the population.

    The point is made here that the fence is not a border: it is a barrier around a prison camp. The people cannot leave.

    The Israeli snipers have killed over 100 people who were protesting the fence in the last few weeks. Over 5,000 have been shot. Over 10000 wounded. Children have been killed by tear gas dropped into their homes. Drones, snipers with fragmentation bullets, are among the weapons of choice. Israel arms exporters have boasted that their product has been "tested on Palestinians". These people are refugees who had their land taken off them by force seventy years ago. Their movement, very resonant of the Irish Civil Rights marches of the 1960s, is unarmed and non-violent. It is led by a broad alliance, not by Hamas, and is Hamas supported. Increasingly there are protests against these massacres by the left wing in Israel.

    https://www.democracynow.org/2018/5/...have_the_right

    https://www.thenation.com/article/pa...th-a-massacre/

    https://original.antiwar.com/ramzy-b...be-beit-daras/

    There have been air attacks on military posts in Gaza in the last two days: it appears that Israel wants to cover its tracks by either starting a war, or creating the appearance of war.


    Gaza City—The sniper bullets don’t come in quick succession. It’s not a barrage of fire. It is methodical, patient, precise. A single shot rings out and someone falls. You wait a few minutes. The crosshairs settle on the next target. Another shot, another body drops. Again and again and again. It goes on for hours.

    This is how the Israeli military shot more than 1,350 Palestinians in Gaza on a single day, on May 14. Slowly.
    As at least 60 people were being killed and over 2,700 wounded, White House officials clinked champagne glasses with their Israeli counterparts 50 miles away in Jerusalem to celebrate the transfer of the US embassy from Tel Aviv. Most people in Gaza have never been to Jerusalem. They can’t go. They can’t really go anywhere. Many have spent their lives trapped inside the 25-mile-long enclave, forbidden from crossing its borders. So they decided to march to the borders, to protest the US decision on Jerusalem, to demand their right of return, to push their bodies up against the limits of their confinement.
    The grassroots movement, dubbed the Great Return March, began on March 30, which marks Land Day in Palestine (an annual commemoration for six Palestinians killed by Israeli forces in demonstrations in 1976 over land confiscations). The plan had been brewing for months. Activists, writers, and civil-society groups all began to organize around the idea of a protest at Gaza’s borders. The tactic of confronting the border is not a new one in Palestine; there have been numerous actions in the past. But this was the first time that it would coalesce into a broad-based, mass movement.
    “The idea of the return marches was to do something collectively—that everyone together approaches the lands occupied in 1948,” said Mohamed Sherafi, a member of the Progressive Student Work Front, known as Taqadomi. “After a span of time, there was an agreement on the shape and form that we now have.”
    Fourteen organizing committees were formed, comprising a broad swath of Palestinian society, including youth groups, women’s groups, nongovernmental organizations, legal-rights bodies, worker syndicates, and cultural associations. Their groundwork led to the formation of a Higher National Committee for the Return Marches, which included all the main political factions, with parties like Hamas, Fatah, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, Islamic Jihad, and others joining forces.
    While Hamas’s participation was key in mobilization and funding efforts, the concept for the marches originated outside the group and was driven and led by all sectors of society.

    In the Western media, Gaza is usually equated with Hamas, relegating all of the Strip’s diversity and political richness, all of its civil society and grassroots agency, to the background. And so it was with the return marches: The protests were widely characterized as being a Hamas operation. While Hamas is the ruling power in Gaza, and its participation was key in mobilization and funding efforts, the concept originated outside of the group and was driven and led by all sectors of society.
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    “Hamas unfortunately is viewed by a number of sides as a terrorist organization, so Israel is trying to tie the marches to Hamas to demonize this movement because it is peaceful and grassroots and popular,” said Hamas media spokesperson Hazem Kassem. “Everyone is taking part. Hamas participates, supports, mobilizes.”
    After much debate, the organizers of the return marches settled on a number of key guidelines regarding tactics: no arms, no military uniforms, no party flags—just the Palestinian flag. People could try to cross the border fence if they wished.
    “We want to break out of this prison. This is our right, this is our land.” —Salah Abdel Aaty, march organizer

    “The goal of this is not an invasion. We want to break out of this prison. This is our right, this is our land,” said Salah Abdel Aaty, a rights lawyer and member of the Higher National Committee.
    For the past 11 years—ever since Hamas took control of Gaza, after having won democratic elections in 2006—Israel has imposed a harsh blockade on the Strip. During Israel’s brutal assault on Gaza in 2014, the primary demand of Gazans was the lifting of Israel’s blockade. Living conditions have steadily deteriorated since then, and are now among the worst in the world. In 2012, the United Nations forecast that Gaza would be “unlivable” by 2020. A new UN report last year found that conditions are deteriorating even “further and faster” than they had predicted. A year ago, in a bid to force Hamas to hand over power to the Palestinian Authority, PA President Mahmoud Abbas imposed further sanctions on Gaza, making the economic and humanitarian situation even more intolerable.
    Last edited by C. Flower; 20-05-2018 at 07:30 AM.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  5. #5
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    Default Re: 70 Years On - Slaughter of Palestinians at Israel Border Protest and US Opens Embassy in Jerusalem

    Irish ambassador was recalled from Israel - Israeli ambassador dressed down by Coveney.

    The Gaza genocide continues - Egypt and Israel has stopped airlift of wounded people to Turkish hospitals.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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