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Thread: Wikileaks claim to have leaks from a CIA hack

  1. #16
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    Default Re: Wikileaks claim to have leaks from a CIA hack

    Quote Originally Posted by jmcc View Post
    Things going a bit pearshaped in Germany with an investigation being opened on CIA's activity in Frankfurt.

    Regards...jmcc
    Not sure if this is new news - Echelon have been at this game for decades now apparently.

    In 1996 author and investigative journalist, Nicky Hager in his book entitled Secret Power, New Zealand’s role in the international spy network, provided a detailed account of ECHELON, the world-wide electronic surveillance system used by an intelligence alliance of the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.[15]

    On 3 November 1999 the BBC reported that they had confirmation from the Australian Government of the existence of a powerful "global spying network" codenamed Echelon, that can eavesdrop on every single phone call, fax or e-mail, anywhere on the planet" with Britain and the United States as the chief protagonists. They confirmed that Menwith Hill was "linked directly to the headquarters of the US National Security Agency (NSA) at Fort Meade in Maryland."[16]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_Menwith_Hill
    "If you go far enough to either extreme of the political spectrum, Communist or fascist, you'll find hard-eyed men with guns who believe that anybody who doesn't think as they do should be incarcerated or exterminated. " - Jim Garrison, Former DA, New Orleans.

  2. #17
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    Default Re: Wikileaks claim to have leaks from a CIA hack

    Quote Originally Posted by pluralist View Post
    Not sure if this is new news - Echelon have been at this game for decades now apparently.
    Echelon is ancient history at this stage. Over the 1990s and early 2000s there was quite a change in traffic patterns. Up to the early 1990s, a lot of traffic had been carried by cables, microwave links concentrated and carried a lot of voice traffic and a lot of transatlantic stuff went via satellite. With the growth of the internet, a lot of high volume stuff shifted to newer transatlantic cables. The Snowden revelations and a lot of Bamford's work (Puzzle Palace, Body Of Secrets) covered the shifts. They are actually quite readable books. There's a very good one by Stephan Budiansky that deals with NSA's work on Soviet ciphers (Code Warriors) that covers the Cold War era in greater detail.

    Regards...jmcc

  3. #18
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    Default Re: Wikileaks claim to have leaks from a CIA hack

    Quote Originally Posted by jmcc View Post
    Echelon is ancient history at this stage. Over the 1990s and early 2000s there was quite a change in traffic patterns. Up to the early 1990s, a lot of traffic had been carried by cables, microwave links concentrated and carried a lot of voice traffic and a lot of transatlantic stuff went via satellite. With the growth of the internet, a lot of high volume stuff shifted to newer transatlantic cables. The Snowden revelations and a lot of Bamford's work (Puzzle Palace, Body Of Secrets) covered the shifts. They are actually quite readable books. There's a very good one by Stephan Budiansky that deals with NSA's work on Soviet ciphers (Code Warriors) that covers the Cold War era in greater detail.

    Regards...jmcc
    One thing that has changed since the 1990s is the extent to which people carry around with them and/or have in their homes devices which hoover up huge amounts of personal information, and which can readily be hacked.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  4. #19
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    Default Re: Wikileaks claim to have leaks from a CIA hack

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    One thing that has changed since the 1990s is the extent to which people carry around with them and/or have in their homes devices which hoover up huge amounts of personal information, and which can readily be hacked.
    It is not even necessary to hack these devices to gain useful data from them.

    Regards...jmcc

  5. #20
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    Default Re: Wikileaks claim to have leaks from a CIA hack

    Quote Originally Posted by DCon View Post

  6. #21
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    Default Re: Wikileaks claim to have leaks from a CIA hack

    Quote Originally Posted by random new yorker View Post
    i found a piece in Time mag on this, it no longer is in the facepage of the NYT and i found this on the Atlantic


    Should Journalists Be More Cautious of WikiLeaks?


    With its latest leak, the site is daring reporters to go on a scavenger hunt for scoops.

    Kaveh Waddell Mar 7, 2017

    Since around the time of the presidential election in November, the U.S. media has taken a hard look at its tumultuous love affair with WikiLeaks. News organizations had lapped up the documents that the site was churning out: first, thousands of emails from the Democratic National Committee, then thousands more from the personal Gmail account of Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager, John Podesta.

    The U.S. intelligence community now says the emails were stolen by Russian hackers and passed along to WikiLeaks for publication, an allegation Assange continues to deny. As the source of the leaked information came into focus, some news organizations began to rethink their eager participation in amplifying it. “Every major publication, including The [New York] Times, published multiple stories citing the DNC and Podesta emails posted by WikiLeaks, becoming a de facto instrument of Russian intelligence,” the Times wrote in a detailed postmortem of Russia’s meddling around the U.S. election.



    Since around the time of the presidential election in November, the U.S. media has taken a hard look at its tumultuous love affair with WikiLeaks. News organizations had lapped up the documents that the site was churning out: first, thousands of emails from the Democratic National Committee, then thousands more from the personal Gmail account of Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager, John Podesta.

    The U.S. intelligence community now says the emails were stolen by Russian hackers and passed along to WikiLeaks for publication, an allegation Assange continues to deny. As the source of the leaked information came into focus, some news organizations began to rethink their eager participation in amplifying it. “Every major publication, including The [New York] Times, published multiple stories citing the DNC and Podesta emails posted by WikiLeaks, becoming a de facto instrument of Russian intelligence,” the Times wrote in a detailed postmortem of Russia’s meddling around the U.S. election.

    So when WikiLeaks dumped thousands of electronic documents stolen from the CIA on its website on Tuesday—a leak it called “the largest intelligence publication in history”—the media got its first chance since the election to try out their new skeptical approach.

    At first blush, the new WikiLeaks reporting didn’t look much different than the old WikiLeaks reporting.

    The Times published a piece written by three journalists that repackaged the contents of a WikiLeaks press release announcing the CIA document dump. The story’s breathless second paragraph read: “If the documents are authentic, as appeared likely at first review, the release would be the latest coup for the anti-secrecy organization and a serious blow to the CIA, which maintains its own hacking capabilities to be used for espionage.”

    The Times article didn’t mention the possibility of a connection between the Russian government and WikiLeaks, which was the focus of a report published by the Director of National Intelligence in January. The Washington Post included a paragraph about WikiLeaks’ track record in its story about the CIA documents, and quoted Nicholas Weaver, a security expert at the University of California, Berkeley, speculating that the data was “probably legitimate or contains a lot of legitimate stuff,” in part because of the sheer size of the leak.

    To be fair, the WikiLeaks dump is momentous, and the Times and the Post published stories about it before it was more than a few hours old. They attempted to check whether the leak was genuine, and made it clear that their determinations of the leak’s authenticity were only preliminary. It is, after all, easy to slip in a few fabricated documents in a trove of thousands.

    The question of how to approach WikiLeaks seems yet unsolved. Should journalists absolve the site of its apparent participation in a Russian campaign to tip the results of the U.S. election? Does the gravity of the documents contained in the CIA leak necessitate reporting on them, even before they’re thoroughly vetted? If these documents appear genuine, how much should news articles question why WikiLeaks published them?

    For its part, WikiLeaks appears to be shifting its strategy with its latest document dump. In the past, it has let the public loose on its leaked documents with little more than a few paragraphs of introduction, occasionally building search functions to let users sift through the largest dumps. The CIA leak, on the other hand, came with a detailed press release and analysis of the some key findings from the documents, written in a journalistic style.

    Uncharacteristically, WikiLeaks appears to have gone out of its way to redact sensitive information and withhold malicious code from the CIA documents it made public. That’s a slight departure from previous leaks, which were wholly unfiltered. In an opinion piece published in the Times in November, Zeynep Tufekci, a scholar of technology and society, wrote about the difference between whistleblowing and document dumping:

    Whistle-blowing … is a time-honored means for exposing the secret machinations of the powerful. But the release of huge amounts of hacked data, with no apparent oversight or curation, does the opposite. Such leaks threaten our ability to dissent by destroying privacy and unleashing a glut of questionable information that functions, somewhat unexpectedly, as its own form of censorship, rather than as a way to illuminate the maneuverings of the powerful.

    The analyses in the WikiLeaks release appear to be nudging reporters toward a few storylines in particular: bureaucratic infighting between the CIA and the National Security Agency, and the dangers of “cyberweapons proliferation,” to name two. But a section of the release with answers to frequently asked questions includes an odd section that speaks directly to journalists.

    One answer encourages reporters who might fear that others will “find all the best stories before me.” WikiLeaks responds: “Unlikely. There are very considerably more stories than there are journalists or academics who are in a position to write them.”


    Stranger still is another answer that suggests WikiLeaks left some of the juiciest documents out of its initial summary. “WikiLeaks has intentionally not written up hundreds of impactful stories to encourage others to find them and so create expertise in the area for subsequent parts in the series. They’re there. Look.” The answer goes on to say, “Those who demonstrate journalistic excellence may be considered for early access to future parts.”

    Here, WikiLeaks sounds less like a purveyor of newsworthy documents and more like an exclusive club that will only accept reporters who complete a scavenger hunt to the organization’s satisfaction. And the race has already begun.

    ---

    Love that carrot!! rny.
    I'll take Wikileaks any day over the braindead US Corporate media, thanks.

    Maybe you could refrain from obfuscation and just address the topic so that we do not get sidetracked? You must know questioning their credibility is just time wasting trolling. They have a very good track record.

    What a coincidence that their most recent revelation was with Clinton getting favoured in a rigged nomination system, and here we have you calling them liars more or less.
    Last edited by Apjp; 09-03-2017 at 12:04 AM.

  7. #22
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    Default Re: Wikileaks claim to have leaks from a CIA hack

    Quote Originally Posted by jmcc View Post
    It is not even necessary to hack these devices to gain useful data from them.

    Regards...jmcc
    O.K., well, they are essentially designed so as to hack your life.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  8. #23
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    Default Re: Wikileaks claim to have leaks from a CIA hack

    The general consensus in the US is that this Wki dump, while embarrassing, substantively is a whole lot o nuttin.


    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/o...308-story.html

    The Big Brother-style implications of a hacked Samsung TV are undermined by the nature of the documents that describe the hack. The CIA needs physical access to the TV set to weaponize it. Robert Graham, founder of Errata Security, wrote on the firm's blog:
    "The docs are clear that they can update the software running on the TV using a USB drive. There's no evidence of them doing so remotely over the Internet. If you aren't afraid of the CIA breaking in an installing a listening device, then you should't be afraid of the CIA installing listening software."
    What happens if the CIA do bug you and you unplug your TV...................
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

  9. #24
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    Default Re: Wikileaks claim to have leaks from a CIA hack

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    O.K., well, they are essentially designed so as to hack your life.
    More like designed to provide data. That data can be abused or it can be used to improve things.

    This is a brief summary I posted on the dark side:

    1. This is the first in a series of dumps of CIA capabilities.

    2. Many of these describe weaponised hacks in that they designed to be easily used by people who may not have developed them and are targeted at the devices (mobile phones, computers, servers of particular targets rather than everyone). They don't trawl the web in the same way some of the NSA systems do. The simplest way would be to consider them as scalpels as opposed to meat grinders.

    3. Most of the "technology" journalists in the media have no background in Technology, Computer Science or specifically in systems insecurity (hacking). You've got to be very careful when reading their views on the Wikileaks/Vault7 stuff.

    4. As with any any exploit, the exploit is time sensitive. This is where the Zeroday phrase originates. From the time a system or software is exploited (and not necessarily disclosed) or the hack is disclosed, there's a race on to fix the software or hardware. The number of vulnerable systems is at the maximum at time zero. Once the manufacturer publishes a fix or a patch for the exploit, the number of vulnerable systems begins to fall as these systems and programs are secured.

    5. With any leaked software, there is a cutoff date. Thus most of these exploits can be dated. Even when patches and fixes are published by the manufacturers, some owners will not use them. This is why eventhough some of these exploits seem to be old or well known, they are still used. The clueless "technology" journalists (and others) don't understand this point because they don't and can't think like people who compromise systems. An exploit that works on an old Android phone or Windows operating system may still work. Targets may not have the latest version of Windows 10 and the fastest i7 laptop.

    6. This provides a good insight into some of CIA's activities. Though some of the methods and exploits may have been disclosed elsewhere, the professional attitude is the same as that in the famous "I'm a weapons man" scene in the movie 'Ronin'. For a professional, it is a tool box and the target generally dictates the choice of weapons.



    Thus it is a case of using what works and not reinventing the wheel. This is a look at some of the tools that CIA has at its disposal.

    7. Some people think that there is still such a thing as privacy. They react in shock and horror that such revelations show that there is not. Technology can be used for good but it can, at the same time, provide an easier route to breach any privacy. And Wikileaks is going to publish more revelations.

    Regards...jmcc

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