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Thread: Great Weekend Reads

  1. #1
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    Default Great Weekend Reads

    I get a couple of weekly emails that are digests of the best recent mag articles & more. There's always something of interest, and never enough time..... Here's this week's batch.

    --"Has Trump Killed the GOP?" -- Politico Magazine: "12 political gurus discuss the most pressing question of 2016." http://politi.co/1PL9D2g



    --"Air Head," by Nathan Heller in The New Yorker: "How aviation made the modern mind." http://bit.ly/20d2yfJ



    --"When America's Titans of Industry and Innovation Went Road-Tripping Together," by Shannon Wianecki in Smithsonian: "Thomas Edison, Henry Ford and their friends traveled the country in Model Ts, creating the Great American road trip in the process." http://bit.ly/1PFSxMW



    --"The Great Whiskey Heist," by Reeves Wiedeman in March's Men's Journal: "How one distillery worker enlisted friends, family, and a few fellow steroid enthusiasts to liberate hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of premium bourbon, one barrel at a time." http://mjm.ag/1JOqIpC (h/t Longform.org)


    --"Ann Selzer Is The Best Pollster In Politics," by Clare Malone in FiveThirtyEight: "How her old-school rigor makes her uncannily accurate." http://53eig.ht/1WTeXA9



    --"Who Owns the Sun?" by Noah Buhayar: "Warren Buffett controls Nevada's legacy utility. Elon Musk is behind the solar company that's upending the market. Let the fun begin." http://bloom.bg/1PLx1g7 See the cover , which shows a wrestling match between the billionaires with Buffett gripping Musk in a headlock http://bit.ly/1KMPmSm



    --"Inside Facebook's Decision to Blow Up the Like Button," by Sarah Frier in Bloomberg BusinessWeek: "A giant version of [the like button] adorns the entrance to the company's campus in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook's 1.6 billion users click on it more than 6 billion times a day-more frequently than people conduct searches on Google." http://bloom.bg/1nECmth



    --"Why Tokyo is the World's Best Food City," by Dave Chang in Lucky Peach: "Nothing comes close." http://bit.ly/1OVmPhv (h/t TheBrowser.com)


    --"The Wreck of Amtrak 188," by Matthew Shaer in tomorrow's N.Y. Times Magazine: "What caused the worst American rail disaster in decades?" http://nyti.ms/1ShEJix



    --"The Dark Underside of the Show-Dog World," by Mark Seal in Vanity Fair: "In the wake of the possible murder of a prized Irish setter, Mark Seal examines the impassioned personalities who devote their lives to dogs, and the tense rivalries that can become sinister." http://bit.ly/1ZZMkRT



    --"The Epic Fail of Hollywood's Hottest Algorithm," by Benjamin Wallace in New York Magazine: "When Ryan Kavanaugh wasn't hanging out with Bradley Cooper, or leasing a horse for Kate Bosworth, or negotiating a Golden Globes shout-out from Christian Bale, or bringing a baby wolf to the office, he was talking up the sweetest game in Hollywood: the chance to invest in movies that seemed certain to succeed." http://bit.ly/1nUUVte



    --"Who Poisoned Flint, Michigan?" by Stephen Rodrick in Rolling Stone: "A writer returns home to find a toxic disaster, giant government failure and countless children exposed to lead." http://rol.st/1Tt1P4M


    --"The Real Legacy of Steve Jobs," by Sue Halpern in the NY Review of Books: "Even as a multimillionaire, and then a billionaire ... Jobs sold himself as an outsider, a principled rebel who had taken a stand against the dominant (what he saw as mindless, crass, imperfect) culture. You could, too, he suggested, if you allied yourself with Apple." http://bit.ly/1SqFnIQ



    FUTURECAST - "Apple builds secret team to kick-start virtual reality effort," by FT's Tim Bradshaw : "Apple has assembled a large team of experts in virtual and augmented reality and built prototypes of headsets that could one day rival Facebook's Oculus Rift or Microsoft's Hololens, as it seeks new sources of growth beyond the iPhone.The secret research unit includes hundreds of staff from a series of carefully targeted acquisitions, as well as employees poached from companies that are working on next-generation headset technologies." http://on.ft.com/1NH569n
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads

    longform.org has the best reads from the US.
    "If you go far enough to either extreme of the political spectrum, Communist or fascist, you'll find hard-eyed men with guns who believe that anybody who doesn't think as they do should be incarcerated or exterminated. " - Jim Garrison, Former DA, New Orleans.

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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads

    Quote Originally Posted by pluralist View Post
    longform.org has the best reads from the US.
    Longform is very good, but you are being very definitive. There are several aggregators that provide a similar service. A look at the front page of Longform today shows significant duplication with my list which came from Politico. Both Alexis Madrigal and Pocket also do good lists albeit with different emphasis.

    http://longform.org/
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads

    Quote Originally Posted by Count Bobulescu View Post
    Longform is very good, but you are being very definitive. There are several aggregators that provide a similar service. A look at the front page of Longform today shows significant duplication with my list which came from Politico. Both Alexis Madrigal and Pocket also do good lists albeit with different emphasis.

    http://longform.org/
    Thanks. Must check politico out.
    "If you go far enough to either extreme of the political spectrum, Communist or fascist, you'll find hard-eyed men with guns who believe that anybody who doesn't think as they do should be incarcerated or exterminated. " - Jim Garrison, Former DA, New Orleans.

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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads

    GREAT WEEKEND READS, curated by Daniel Lippman:

    --"Cheap cab ride? You must have missed Uber's true cost," by Evgeny Morozov in The Guardian: "When tech giants such as Google and Uber hide their wealth from taxation, they make it harder for us to use technology to improve services." http://bit.ly/1Pd6xki

    --"The Noma Way," by Tienlon Ho in California Sunday Magazine : "One chef, ten weeks, thirty dishes, and hundreds of new ingredients. How Danish superstar René Redzepi created an entirely new restaurant in Australia." http://bit.ly/1KwsxHW (h/t Longreads.com)

    --"Scammers and Spammers: Inside Online Dating's Sex Bot Con Job," by David Kushner in Rolling Stone: "Sexy, single and artificially-intelligent - fake profiles are wooing lonely hearts on sites far beyond Ashley Madison." http://rol.st/20yWD51

    --"The Walter White of Wichita," by Cristina Costantini and Darren Foster in Fusion: "George Marquardt was an eccentric gadgeteer in Kansas. But his self-taught chemistry made drug dealers millions. And when federal agents finally caught him, America's first fentanyl epidemic came to a screeching halt." http://fus.in/1PqwwCu

    --"The Strange, Crazy Afterlife of a Reality TV Star," by Washingtonian's Luke Mullins: "Step into Tareq Salahi's house and you'll pass a framed Washington Post article crowning him a 2009 Person of the Year." http://bit.ly/1QMsg2O

    --"The 100 Jokes That Shaped Modern Comedy," by Jesse David Fox in New York Magazine: "From the Marx Brothers to The Simpsons, Richard Pryor to Amy Schumer: 100 bits, sketches, and one-liners that changed humor forever." http://bit.ly/1S6ALsH

    --"The Problem with Jewish Museums," by Edward Rothstein in Mosaic Magazine: "Ours is an era of museums celebrating the identity of nearly every group and ethnicity. But something else takes place when the identity in question is Jewish." http://bit.ly/1PqwTwZ

    --"The epic uncool of Philip Seymour Hoffman," by Nathan Rabin in The Dissolve: "When Philip Seymour Hoffman died of an accidental drug overdose on February 2, 2014 at age 46, it felt like a huge part of the past two decades of cinema had disappeared as well, as if all the wonderful characters he created were on some level buried with the man who played them." http://bit.ly/1K4aWae

    --"A Conversation With The New York Times' A.O. Scott," by Isaac Chotiner in Slate: "On the purpose of film criticism, the academy's diversity problem, and why Leo DiCaprio shouldn't get an Oscar for 2.5 hours of grunting." http://slate.me/20yXcM8
    His new book, "Better Living Through Criticism: How to Think about Art, Pleasure, Beauty, and Truth" -- $17.76 on Amazon http://amzn.to/1QMviUX

    --"The Bouvier Affair," by Sam Knight in The New Yorker: "How an art-world insider made a fortune by being discreet." http://bit.ly/1QjqP9j

    --"Inside the Eye: Nature's Most Exquisite Creation," by Ed Yong in February's National Geographic: "To understand how animals see, look through their eyes." http://bit.ly/1QMsEye (h/t Longform.org)

    --"The Road to Little Dribbling," by Bill Bryson in Penguin: "Read the prologue from Bill Bryson's hilarious new book: 'One of the things that happens when you get older is that you discover lots of new ways to hurt yourself.'" http://bit.ly/1USHbcW

    --"The congresswoman who grew up in a gas station," by Arizona Republic's Rebekah L. Sanders: "U.S. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema's journey from homelessness to holding a Ph.D., law license and an office on Capitol Hill." http://bit.ly/1S6TCUF

    --"In Search of Forty Winks," by Patricia Marx in The New Yorker: "Gizmos for a good night's sleep." http://bit.ly/1mjWUpi

    --"The Lives and Lies of a Professional Impostor," by James C. McKinley Jr. and Rick Rojas in tomorrow's Times: "He had spent 25 years stealing Social Security numbers and fabricating new aliases ... Though fraud has become an increasingly invisible offense in a digital world, [Jeremy] Wilson ... has portrayed himself as a Scottish-born D.J., a Cambridge-trained thespian, a Special Forces officer and a professor at M.I.T." http://nyti.ms/1Q1f1hY

    --"How Joan Didion the Writer Became Joan Didion the Legend," by Lili Anolik in Vanity Fair : "Joan Didion arrived in Los Angeles in 1964 on the way to becoming one of the most important writers of her generation, a cultural icon who changed L.A.'s perception of itself." http://bit.ly/1TK7iob
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads

    GREAT WEEKEND READS, curated by Daniel Lippman, filing from NYC, where he's seeing "Hamilton" tonight:

    --"We Are Hopelessly Hooked," by Jacob Weisberg in the N.Y. Review of Books: "Once out of bed, we check our phones 221 times a day-an average of every 4.3 minutes ... What does it mean to shift overnight from a society in which people walk down the street looking around to one in which people walk down the street looking at machines?" http://bit.ly/1TgAdka

    --"How America Is Putting Itself Back Together," by James Fallows on the cover of March's Atlantic: "Most people in the U.S. believe their country is going to hell. But they're wrong. What a three-year journey by single-engine plane reveals about reinvention and renewal." http://theatln.tc/1Xof2Mm ... See the cover. http://bit.ly/1objORU

    --"A Country Breaking Down," by Elizabeth Drew in the N.Y. Review of Books: "The near-total failure of our political institutions to invest for the future ... has left us with hopelessly clogged traffic, at risk of being on a bridge that collapses, or on a train that flies off defective rails, or with rusted pipes carrying our drinking water." http://bit.ly/1oaVFdX

    --"Can This Man Save U.S. Soccer?" by Amanda Ripley in the March issue of The Atlantic: "How one teacher is attempting to train a generation of globally competitive players--starting with their coaches." http://theatln.tc/1PHWMIG

    --"American Pharoah's Second Life as a $200-K-A-Night Stud," by Monte Reel in Bloomberg Businessweek: "The world's fastest horse could earn more in the shed than he made on the track." http://bloom.bg/1SmgWxD

    --"Could You Stomach the Horrors of 'Halftime' in Ancient Rome?" by Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz in LiveScience.com:"With a flourish, trapdoors in the floor of the arena were opened, and lions, bears, wild boars and leopards rushed into the arena. The starved animals bounded toward the terrified criminals, who attempted to leap away from the beasts' snapping jaws." http://bit.ly/241nMg4

    --"The Killing of Warren Weinstein," by Daniel Bergner in tomorrow's N.Y. Times Magazine: "After the American aid worker was abducted in Pakistan, his family undertook a delicate negotiation in hopes of securing his release. But then they got word that he had died - in a United States drone strike." http://nyti.ms/1R0ax8g

    --"Why anti-intellectualism is the real snobbery," by Steven Poole in The Guardian, reviewing "Pretentiousness: Why It Matters" by Dan Fox:"Calling something pretentious is lazy, vacuous and smug - after all, it's good at times for our ambition to outstrip our abilities. Those who invoke bluff 'common sense' are the actual snobs." http://bit.ly/1Lln5T9 ... Pre-order -- $15.95 on Amazon http://amzn.to/1Wi9S3x (h/t ALDaily.com)
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads

    A bonanza for political science junkies.

    60 page catalog of new and existing publications from the Brookings Institute

    http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Press/catalogs/Brookings-Spring-2016-Catalog_web.pdf?la=en
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads

    GREAT WEEKEND READS, curated by the indispensable Daniel Lippman:


    --"Bearing Witness to the Rise of ISIS: The Story of Anna Therese Day," by Gail Sheehy on Jezebel: "As unlikely as it may seem, the story of Anna Day, an intrepid and slight blonde twentysomething from Idaho with a name like a Beatles song, is entangled with the saga of how peaceful political change sought by young Arab activists collapsed against the genocidal appeal of the ISIS narrative." http://bit.ly/1QCoCFU (h/t Longform.org)


    --"Selfies, Dating, and the American 14-Year-Old," by Nancy Jo Sales in Vanity Fair , in an adaption from her new book "American Girls: Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teenagers": "As crushes go from real-life likes to digital 'likes,' the typical American teenage girl is confronted with a set of social anxieties never before seen in human history. ... Nancy Jo Sales observes one 14-year-old as she gets ready to embark on her first I.R.L. date." http://bit.ly/24tyaxq ... $20.27 on Amazon http://amzn.to/21xZvMl



    --"The Real Story of Germanwings Flight 9525," by Joshua Hammer in GQ: "One year after a young pilot crashed a German airliner into the remote French Alps-a suicide and mass homicide that transfixed and horrified the world-Joshua Hammer investigates what really happened that day." http://bit.ly/24txW9q (h/t TheBrowser.com)


    --"Head in the cloud," by Sophie McBain in The New Statesman: "As we download ever more of our lives on to electronic devices, are we destroying our own internal memory?" http://bit.ly/1oFaYLP



    --"MFA vs. CIA: A writer considers an alternate life as an undercover agent," by Jennifer duBois in Lapham's Quarterly: "[T]here are parallels in the underlying qualities of their practitioners: an interest in psychology, a facility with narrative, a tendency to position oneself as an observer, and a willingness to lie and call it something else." http://bit.ly/1TczUrb (h/t ALDaily.com)


    --"How Randy Newman and His Family Have Shaped Movie Music for Generations," by David Kamp in Vanity Fair: "Sure, you know of the Oscar-winning composer behind Toy Story and his endearingly offbeat songwriting, but Newman, 72, is also the patriarch of a clan that has helped shape movie music since the talkies. David Kamp chronicles the Newman version of the American Dream." http://bit.ly/24txKHa



    --"An Honest Thief," by Justin Peters in The Long+Short: "How free-culture pioneer Aaron Swartz fought for the free exchange of information, and lost." http://bit.ly/1TJ6jWd (h/t Longreads.com)


    --" The Longform Guide to Rich Kids": "Paris Hilton, Princeton phonies, and the prince who blew through billions-a collection of articles on young money." http://bit.ly/210yxLo


    --"How Mark Zuckerberg Should Give Away $45 Billion: It's complicated," by Michael Hobbes in HuffPost: "Last year, six of the 10 largest charitable donations in the United States came from the tech sector, solidifying Silicon Valley's place as the epicenter of the newer, bigger, disrupty-er philanthropy." http://huff.to/1UqjyKN



    --"Preparing for the Collapse of the Saudi Kingdom," by Sarah Chayes and Alex De Waal in TheAtlantic.com: "It can't last. The U.S. better get ready." http://theatln.tc/1QLLol2



    --"Hunting Boko Haram," by Joshua Hammer in The Intercept: "The U.S. Extends Its Drone War Deeper Into Africa With Secretive Base." http://bit.ly/1XQg5Fd



    - "One Day, 625 Delays," by Robert Kolker in New York Magazine: "A mechanical failure at Union Square cascaded into hours of underground hell, revealing just how fragile the subway really is." http://nym.ag/1mX8JCq (h/t TheBrowser.com)


    --"Expedia Thinks It Can Help You Find the Dream Vacation You Didn't Know You Wanted," by Bloomberg Businessweek's Drake Bennett : "Can the mid-'90s travel survivor thrive by understanding the psyche of the modern traveler?" http://bloom.bg/21xWonK



    --"Jennifer Garner's Frank Talk About Kids, Men, and Ben Affleck," by Krista Smith on Vanity Fair's March cover: "The silent center of a tabloid hurricane, Jennifer Garner is finally speaking out. ... [S]he talks about breaking up with Ben Affleck, dealing with the pain, and keeping her kids and career in focus." http://bit.ly/1UprifZ ... The cover http://bit.ly/1S7eNFp



    --"What Google Learned From Its Quest to Build the Perfect Team," by Charles Duhigg in today's N.Y. Times Magazine, in "The Work Issue: Reimagining the Office":"New research reveals surprising truths aboutwhy some work groups thrive and others falter." http://nyti.ms/1pdHBAF



    --"The Scold: Mr. Money Mustache's retirement (sort of) plan," by Nick Paumgarten in The New Yorker: "[T]he central tenet of Mustachianism is 'financial freedom through badassity.' ... Mr. Money Mustache is the alias of a forty-one-year-old Canadian expatriate named Peter Adeney, who made or, more to the point, saved enough money in his twenties, working as a software engineer, to retire at age thirty." http://bit.ly/1T38PX5



    MEDIAWATCH -- "Will Shortz: Everything You Wanted to Know About Crossword Puzzles," by NYT's Susan Lehman in a Times Insider podcast : "What's the most commonly used word in the paper's puzzles? (Answer: 'era.') What is the puzzle master's obsession with Oreos - which, a reader notes, seems like an answer four times a week? In this spirited podcast, Mr. Shortz ... also offers advice for young puzzlers, an anecdote about a crossword custom designed for former President Bill Clinton and thoughts on the connection between puzzles and ... Ping-Pong (another Shortz obsession.)" http://nyti.ms/1TdO9w7
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads

    GREAT WEEKEND READS, curated by Daniel Lippman:


    --"The Plot to Take Down a Fox News Analyst," by Alex French in tomorrow's N.Y. Times Magazine: "For years, Wayne Simmons claimedto be a former C.I.A. operative.Then one ex-spook got suspicious." http://nyti.ms/1RsR39V (h/t Longform.org)


    --"The Bidding War," by Matthieu Aikins in The New Yorker: "How a young Afghan military contractor became spectacularly rich." http://bit.ly/1TJxhvy



    --TODD PURDUM in Vanity Fair, "St. Paul's Before and After the Owen Labrie Rape Trial": "There are two very different accounts of what happened the evening of May 30, 2014, at the elite prep school between 18-year-old scholar-athlete Owen Labrie and a 15-year-old freshman girl. ... Alumnus Todd S. Purdum investigates his alma mater." http://bit.ly/1TYW7rg



    --"Trumping Liberty," by J.C. Derrick in the World Magazine: "Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. has embarked on a mission to elect Donald Trump. How will a polarizing political endorsement affect a top evangelical school?" http://bit.ly/1QSc6Cg



    --"This Lawyer is Hollywood's Complete Divorce Solution," by Bloomberg Businessweek's Claire Suddath: "No one separates the rich and famous better than Laura Wasser." http://bloom.bg/1nl4r7P (h/t Longreads.com)


    --"Wanna Be Startin' Somethin': A History of the Windows Start Menu," by Tom Warren in The Verge: "Microsoft's most identifiable product has had 20 years of ups and downs." http://bit.ly/1VW9ebV



    --"The Daily Telegraph through the eyes of its readers," by Christopher Howse:
    "As The Daily Telegraph publishes its 50,000th edition, we look back at the vivid snapshots of history detailed in readers' letters to the Editor". http://bit.ly/1SnBJQZ



    --"Have You Ever Tried to Sell a Diamond?" by Edward Jay Epstein in the Feb. 1982 issue of The Atlantic: "An unruly market may undo the work of a giant cartel and of an inspired, decades-long ad campaign." http://theatln.tc/1Tv5j8D



    --"Naughty words," by Rebecca Roache in Aeon Magazine: "What makes swear words so offensive? It's not their meaning or even their sound. Is language itself a red herring here?" http://bit.ly/21NIJsH (h/t ALDaily.com)


    --"Why the literati love Muhammad Ali," by FT's Janan Ganesh: "A new exhibition showcases the boxer's hero status. But it's his less saintly side that is a magnet for literary big-hitters". http://on.ft.com/1Tw3PuL
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads

    Great list, Count, and no paywalls that I saw. I expected to be blocked from The New Yorker on your earlier list but wasn't. I have an NYT sub, so that was fine. The Atlantic is offering two free trial issues and of course the Guardian has no paywall, just requests donations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spectabilis View Post
    Great list, Count, and no paywalls that I saw. I expected to be blocked from The New Yorker on your earlier list but wasn't. I have an NYT sub, so that was fine. The Atlantic is offering two free trial issues and of course the Guardian has no paywall, just requests donations.
    thx. I think you can get access to most Atlantic material, just maybe not the current edition, without a sub. I don't have one. And there are easy technical ways to bypass paywalls such as the Economist.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/
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    Good to know. I only have one or two subs at a time and switch them around, but I get withdrawal symptoms then and something I can only call 'austerity rage' As the cuts bore down, the paywalls went up.

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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads

    Quote Originally Posted by Spectabilis View Post
    Good to know. I only have one or two subs at a time and switch them around, but I get withdrawal symptoms then and something I can only call 'austerity rage' As the cuts bore down, the paywalls went up.
    I use Firefox as my primary browser, and they have a "private browsing" setting. Click the 3 bar "menu" top right of screen. Here's what I see when I first click the setting. Other browsers have something similar.

    You're browsing privately

    Not Saved

    History
    Searches
    Cookies
    Temporary Files

    Saved

    Downloads
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    Please note that your employer or Internet service provider can still track the pages you visit.
    Learn More.
    Tracking Protection ON

    Private windows now block parts of the page that may track your browsing activity.
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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads

    GREAT WEEKEND READS, curated by Daniel Lippman:


    --"Jesus of Nazareth, Whose Messianic Message Captivated Thousands, Dies at About 33," by Sam Roberts in Vanity Fair: "Roberts, an obituary writer for The New York Times, imagines how, given the facts available then, his predecessors might have reported the aftermath of an execution in the Middle East one Friday two millennia ago." http://bit.ly/1UZby4C


    --"The Men Who Gave Trump His Brutal Worldview," by Michael D'Antonio, author of "Never Enough: Donald Trump and the Pursuit of Success," on Politico Magazine: "Tutored by his fiercely ambitious father and tough-as-nails high school coach, the GOP frontrunner has only one ethical code: life is combat." http://politi.co/1LYiY5C... $15.16 on Amazon http://amzn.to/1g8Rlak


    --"This Professor Knows Why You Hate Ted Cruz's Face" --Washingtonian Staff: "(He read the other candidates' faces, too.)" http://bit.ly/1M1RDiU


    --"Emma Smith on The Best Plays of Shakespeare" - interviewed by Beatrice Wilford on FiveBooks.com: "In the first of a series marking the 400th year since the playwright's death, we ask Shakespearean scholar Emma Smith to pick her five favourite plays." http://bit.ly/1MHUeyx


    --"Murder in Mayfair," by Peter Pomerantsev in The London Review of Books, reviewing "A Very Expensive Poison: The Definitive Story of the Murder of Litvinenko and Russia's War with the West," by Luke Harding: "As he lay dying Alexander Litvinenko ... found it increasingly hard to open his mouth to talk, as he became yellow and shrivelled, he cursed himself for letting his guard down: he had assumed he was safe after receiving asylum and citizenship in the UK." http://bit.ly/1MHUqhg ... $12.93 on Amazon http://amzn.to/1RS7lfM (h/t TheBrowser.com)


    --"The Strange Case of a Nazi Who Became an Israeli Hitman," by Forward's Dan Raviv and Yossi Melman in Haaretz: "Otto Skorzeny, one of the Mossad's most valuable assets, was a former lieutenant colonel in Nazi Germany's Waffen-SS and one of Adolf Hitler's favorites." http://bit.ly/1RRUhds


    --"How to Hack an Election," by Jordan Robertson, Michael Riley, and Andrew Willis on Bloomberg Businessweek's international cover: "Andrés Sepúlveda rigged elections throughout Latin America for almost a decade. He tells his story for the first time." http://bloom.bg/1RRUqxm ... The coverhttp://bit.ly/1qkEUOn


    --"How Meryl Streep Battled Dustin Hoffman, Retooled Her Role, and Won Her First Oscar," by Michael Schulman on the cover of April's Vanity Fair, in an adaptation of his upcoming biography "Her Again: Becoming Meryl Streep" (out April 26):"At 29, Meryl Streep was grieving for a dead lover, falling for her future husband, and starting work on Kramer vs. Kramer, the movie that would make her a star and sweep the 1980 Oscars. ... Schulman recounts the struggles-physical, emotional, and intellectual-that launched Streep's legend." http://bit.ly/1RRUw8l ... The cover http://bit.ly/1RuAL4x ... $20.35 pre-order on Amazon http://amzn.to/1pUgx9P (h/t Longform.org)


    --"#Jihad: Why ISIS is winning the social media war," by Brendan I. Koerner in Wired: "The group's closest peers are not just other terrorist organizations, then, but also the Western brands, marketing firms, and publishing outfits-from PepsiCo to BuzzFeed-who ply the Internet with memes and messages in the hopes of connecting with customers." http://bit.ly/1Y4E0jF ... Video of Koerner on CBS This Morning: Saturday" http://cbsn.ws/1Y6qImE


    --"The Longform Guide to the Dark Side of Hollywood": 8 pieces on "Corruption, venality, and tragedy: a collection of picks on what lies beneath the glitter." http://bit.ly/1M7kPVN


    --"Crowd Source," by Davy Rothbart in California Sunday Magazine: "Inside the company that provides fake paparazzi, pretend campaign supporters, and counterfeit protesters." http://bit.ly/1SGsWYC (h/t Longreads.com)
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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    Default Re: Great Weekend Reads


    GREAT WEEKEND READS, curated by Daniel Lippman:


    --"The Secret History of Tiger Woods," by Wright Thompson on the cover of the upcoming "Fame" issue of ESPN: The Magazine: "The death of his father set a battle raging inside the world's greatest golfer. How he waged that war -- through an obsession with the Navy SEALs -- is the tale of how Tiger lost his way." http://es.pn/248L2rC (h/t Longreads.com)


    --"The Secret Shame of Middle-Class Americans," by Neil Gabler on the cover of The Atlantic's May Issue, "The Money Report": "Nearly half of Americans would have trouble finding $400 to pay for an emergency. I'm one of them." http://theatln.tc/1ShzIp5 ... The cover. http://bit.ly/1YLRNMt


    --"A Mysterious Startup, a Mountain of Money, and The Quest to Create a New Kind of Reality," by Kevin Kelly on the cover of Wired's upcoming May issue (out nationally next week): "The world's hottest startup isn't located in Silicon Valley-it's in suburban Florida. Kevin Kelly explores what Magic Leap's mind-bending technology tells us about the future of virtual reality." http://bit.ly/1YEjFBW ... See the cover by photographer Sebastian Kim of Magic Leap founder Rony Abovitz, with light beaming out of his eyes. http://bit.ly/215P5TL


    --"Why Luck Matters More Than You Might Think," by Robert H. Frank in The Atlantic: "When people see themselves as self-made, they tend to be less generous and public-spirited." http://theatln.tc/23OKMkM


    --"The $2 Trillion Project to Get Saudi Arabia's Economy Off Oil," by Peter Waldman on the cover of the latest Bloomberg Businessweek: "Eight unprecedented hours with 'Mr. Everything,' Prince Mohammed bin Salman." http://bloom.bg/1Qt0ncP


    --"Who says bacon is bad? How the World Health Organization's cancer agency confuses consumers," by Reuters' Kate Kelland: "Processed meat, such as bacon, ranks alongside plutonium as a carcinogen, according to an arm of the WHO. Here's how such assessments happen - and what they mean." http://reut.rs/1QsXd8Z


    --"David Foster Wallace's Perfect Game," by John Jeremiah Sullivan in The New Yorker: "The game is French to the core-not one but two of France's early kings died at the tennis courts ... They called it jeu de paume, the 'game of the palm,' or 'handball,' if we want to be less awkwardly literal about it. (Originally they had played it with the bare hand, then came gloves, then paddles, then rackets.)" http://bit.ly/1WhM6H1


    --"The Untold Story of the Teen Hackers Who Transformed the Early Internet," by Matt Novak in Gizmodo: "After WarGames came out in June 1983, every wannabe hacker with more money than sense went out and got a computer and modem." http://bit.ly/1ShAMJz ... Trailer http://bit.ly/1qGUrrz


    -"Offshore in central London: the curious case of 29 Harley Street," by Oliver Bullough in The Guardian: "On a central London street renowned for high-class healthcare sits a property that houses 2,159 companies. Why has this prestigious address been used so many times as a centre for elaborate international fraud?" http://bit.ly/1WL6MaM (h/t TheBrowser.com)


    --"Bob Dylan: The Uncut Interview," by Robert Love in the Feb/March 2015 issue of AARP The Magazine February: "[H]e opens up about his creative process and his new disc, 'Shadows in the Night.'" http://bit.ly/1QsYBbB


    --"Even Sex Goddesses Get The Blues," by Gerri Hirshey in New York Mag: "Legendary Cosmo editor Helen Gurley Brown made her career on sleeping with many men and encouraging readers to do the same. But behind closed doors, she agonized over lost loves and unfaithful partners." http://thecut.io/1VN0J66


    --"The Graduate," by Nora Ephron in the Nov. 2010 Elle : "It was gritty (the deadlines and dollar poker) and glamorous (movie stars and politicos for subjects) and everything I'd been longing for-to begin my life in New York as a journalist." http://bit.ly/1T41jqa


    --"Monica Lewinsky: 'The shame sticks to you like tar,'" by Jon Ronson in The Guardian: "Nearly 20 years ago, Monica Lewinsky found herself at the heart of a political storm. Now she's turned that dark time into a force for good." http://bit.ly/23OJ3vW


    --"The Jewish Plot To Kill Hitler," by Robert Rockaway in Tablet Magazine: "How the FBI prevented Jewish American gangsters from altering the course of history in 1933." http://bit.ly/1XNifoF


    --"I Don't Care about Your Life," by Jason Guriel in The Walrus: "Why critics need to stop getting personal in their essays." http://bit.ly/1r55oUo


    --"Why Revolutionaries Love Spicy Food," by Andrew Leonard in Nautilus: "How the chili pepper got to China." http://bit.ly/215fFfK


    --"Prince: 1958-2016," by Mike Dang on Longreads.com: "Here are six stories about the legendary musician." http://bit.ly/1ShzLRK


    --"How Animals Think," by Alison Gopnik in the May Atlantic, reviewing "Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?" by Frans de Waal: "A new look at what humans can learn from nonhuman minds."http://theatln.tc/26kyQpF ... $17.04 on Amazon http://amzn.to/1r5dblc(h/t ALDaily.com)


    --"The Longform Guide to Sleep": "The nightmare of insomnia, the secret of slumber, and the search for the next Ambien - our favorite [five] articles about sleep." http://bit.ly/22Ug2cv


    WASHINGTON, INC. - "The Android Administration: Google's Remarkably Close Relationship With the Obama White House, in Two Charts," by David Dayen in The Intercept: "No other public company approaches this degree of intimacy with government. ... [T]he Google lobbyist with the most White House visits, Johanna Shelton, visited 128 times, far more often than lead representatives of the other top-lobbying companies - and more than twice as often, for instance, as Microsoft's Fred Humphries or Comcast's David Cohen." http://bit.ly/215ff8Z
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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