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Thread: The Age of Horrorism

  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: The Age of Horrorism

    Quite a lot of reading there, and I've given it a quick scan through. Part fact, part fiction. Shows that Amis is a powerful literary writer. My preference in political analysis is to recognise that there are economic underpinnings to society that are strongly determinant on how things are played out by state forces, socially and culturally. Amis makes no concession to that approach - it is pretty well all about what people think and feel, to Amis and therefore to me his view is chaotic and superficial.
    He does remind us that Sayyed Qutb was in a US university when he put together the Muslim Brotherhood ideology, something missed out of many accounts of the MB.

    Is "Horrorism" any different from previous terrorism ? I think perhaps what is new is the extent to which some terror events (not all) are now geared as spectacles for emotional impact when read about or viewed in the media.

    Presenting it as a tactic only used by Muslims against the west is clearly nonsense - many thousands of people have been killed just in Iraq, over the last decade, in street bomb attacks.

    Noticeable too that Amis tarrs every Muslim with the same brush and does not anywhere talk about the vast mass of Muslim people who are opposed to terrorrism and have nothing to do with it. He over-credits Qutb, and the terrorists and reinforces their message that religious divide is all important, when to most people it is not.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  3. #3
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    Default Re: The Age of Horrorism

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Quite a lot of reading there, and I've given it a quick scan through. Part fact, part fiction. Shows that Amis is a powerful literary writer. My preference in political analysis is to recognise that there are economic underpinnings to society that are strongly determinant on how things are played out by state forces, socially and culturally. Amis makes no concession to that approach - it is pretty well all about what people think and feel, to Amis and therefore to me his view is chaotic and superficial.
    He does remind us that Sayyed Qutb was in a US university when he put together the Muslim Brotherhood ideology, something missed out of many accounts of the MB.

    Is "Horrorism" any different from previous terrorism ? I think perhaps what is new is the extent to which some terror events (not all) are now geared as spectacles for emotional impact when read about or viewed in the media.

    Presenting it as a tactic only used by Muslims against the west is clearly nonsense - many thousands of people have been killed just in Iraq, over the last decade, in street bomb attacks.

    Noticeable too that Amis tarrs every Muslim with the same brush and does not anywhere talk about the vast mass of Muslim people who are opposed to terrorrism and have nothing to do with it. He over-credits Qutb, and the terrorists and reinforces their message that religious divide is all important, when to most people it is not.
    I think that this a nuanced critique.

    I'd probably defend him against the charge that his analysis is "chaotic and superficial", as I tend to like impressionistic narratives, even while recognising their subjectivity, but if we accept that the function - or one of the functions - of the "Artist in Society", is telling truth to power, then its hard to see that he does that or even attempts to.

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