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Thread: The Man In The Minesweeper

  1. #1
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    Default The Man In The Minesweeper



    In Balbriggan harbour Shane Kennedy lives in an old minesweeper, and it seems he has been engaged in a legal battle with the council over the past number of years as to whether he can stay or not. He is currently awaiting a decision on the matter from the Supreme Court.

    A FINAL decision in a legal action against a man living on an allegedly unsafe former minesweeper vessel has been deferred.



    Shane Kennedy has been living on the "very large" 100 tonne "Portisham" vessel since 2007 and brought it into Balbriggan harbour in 2010.
    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news...-31419068.html



    To whom may be interested.
    I live on an old minesweeper, Portisham.
    Currently berthed in Balbriggan Harbour, the Co Council have initiated legal action with the intention of removing me from my boat, and having her scrapped. Having attended the High Court, I now have to send in an affidavit stating my case.
    IMO, it is a disgrace that apart from a few private inland berths, the only legislation I have found is to ban liveaboards. As an island nation, with a long history of small scale exploration and a few cases of larger scale involvement ... the navies of the USA, Argentina, and Chile all had major Irish involvement, it is a disgrace that we don'e embrace liveaboards as do most maritime nations.
    Grand Canal Dock, in particular, could be the jewel in Dublin's crown, if not that of the nation's. Waterways Ireland have, for the last 10 years, been procrastinating about them, keeping boats out of the dock "until they decide how to accommodate houseboats".
    Sligo, Galway, Limerick, Cork, Wexford, Arklow, DunLaoghaire, Drogeeda, and Dundalk all have potential, if only the local authorities could take off their blinkers. I phoned Fingal Co Co several years ago, to ask about construction a residential marina.
    The conversation went ...
    Them: Has it been done anywhere else ?
    Me: All over the world.
    Then: No, in Ireland.
    Me: Not that I am aware of.
    Them: Forget it then, it isn't going to happen here.


    Regards
    Shane (O'Brien)Kennedy
    http://afloat.ie/component/kunena/?f...atid=2&id=3299
    The United Irishman. Updated 5/2/14

  2. #2
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    Default Re: The Man In The Minesweeper

    Saoirse go Deo, thanks for the link. Interesting story. Of course there should be liveaboard places in Irish harbours where possible. Thanks for the link. Perhaps a twitter topic?
    We are all insane animals existing for a time on an obviously unfinished planet.
    www.irelandtoo.com

  3. #3
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    Default Re: The Man In The Minesweeper

    Mr. Kennedy's boat does not look like a rusting hulk and is of some historic interest.

    Liveabord life is at its best I would guess in Amsterdam, but is good on the Thames and I guess very many other places.

    The State has no time or money to sort out legislation, but time for litigation ? Great for the legal profession, stinks for everyone else.

    Bloomin' typical.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  4. #4
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    Default Re: The Man In The Minesweeper

    It seems that if one does not conform then you are liable to find yourself a target, whether it's living in a caravan, or in this case, a boat. I have a feeling that if it were a massive yacht owned by one of the great and the good there would be no fuss.
    The United Irishman. Updated 5/2/14

  5. #5
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    Default Re: The Man In The Minesweeper

    There are probably still some WW2 mines in the Irish sea. Why not pay this man to go out at intervals to sweep them in return for his berthage?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: The Man In The Minesweeper

    Quote Originally Posted by Saoirse go Deo View Post
    It seems that if one does not conform then you are liable to find yourself a target, whether it's living in a caravan, or in this case, a boat. I have a feeling that if it were a massive yacht owned by one of the great and the good there would be no fuss.
    That about sums it up, but who would bring a superyacht into a small tidal harbour with almost no facilities ? The boat did look very scruffy when I brought it here, but it has improved immensely since then. The one Councilor who spoke to me, and then only because I accosted him on the quay, when I introduced myself immediately said "there is no corruption in Fingal County Council" "WHAT ?" "Ohh never mind". He then said that they had recently had several old fishing boats broken up and didn't want to have to do that again, yet that is precisely what they applied to the High Court to do ! They now claim that, a boat, in a harbour, needs planning permission. Ditto, a vessel anchoring offshore. WTF ! That is not only what harbours have been used for, it is what they were built for. According to them, a ship, wanting to anchor in Irish waters, has to apply to the local authority for permission ? We are already hated by merchant ship's captains for an officious administration, now the local authorities want to regulate them too. In my case, they decided that they wanted to get rid of me, then went looking for a mechanism to achieve that.
    I grew up on a barge on the Shannon, my parents started the first company there, to rent cabin cruisers, in 1960. At this point, I have lived on a boat 27 of my 57 years.
    BTW: This little ship was built in 1955, with Cold War hostilities in mind. She was one of 93 "ham" class Inshore Minesweepers. All named after British towns with names ending in "ham". The ones that the Irish Naval Service had were successors to the hams, called "ton" class, with similar naming practice.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: The Man In The Minesweeper

    Quote Originally Posted by sbkenn View Post
    That about sums it up, but who would bring a superyacht into a small tidal harbour with almost no facilities ? The boat did look very scruffy when I brought it here, but it has improved immensely since then. The one Councilor who spoke to me, and then only because I accosted him on the quay, when I introduced myself immediately said "there is no corruption in Fingal County Council" "WHAT ?" "Ohh never mind". He then said that they had recently had several old fishing boats broken up and didn't want to have to do that again, yet that is precisely what they applied to the High Court to do ! They now claim that, a boat, in a harbour, needs planning permission. Ditto, a vessel anchoring offshore. WTF ! That is not only what harbours have been used for, it is what they were built for. According to them, a ship, wanting to anchor in Irish waters, has to apply to the local authority for permission ? We are already hated by merchant ship's captains for an officious administration, now the local authorities want to regulate them too. In my case, they decided that they wanted to get rid of me, then went looking for a mechanism to achieve that.
    I grew up on a barge on the Shannon, my parents started the first company there, to rent cabin cruisers, in 1960. At this point, I have lived on a boat 27 of my 57 years.
    BTW: This little ship was built in 1955, with Cold War hostilities in mind. She was one of 93 "ham" class Inshore Minesweepers. All named after British towns with names ending in "ham". The ones that the Irish Naval Service had were successors to the hams, called "ton" class, with similar naming practice.
    Welcome sbkenn (I was going to say AHOY! but you are probably fed up with nautical jokes). It does seem like Fingal cc have it in for you. With a bit of imagination your boat could be an interesting addition to the harbor. If Fingal cc helped you paint it in its old navy colours and posted information about it and related matters it could serve as quite an educational attraction.
    They are much better at that sort of historic stuff in the UK, and they often include detailed and technical info for those interested.
    As I have said many times why don't we learn from what other countries do well (and also what they don't do well).

    Wont you keep us posted. Good luck.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: The Man In The Minesweeper

    Quote Originally Posted by sbkenn View Post
    That about sums it up, but who would bring a superyacht into a small tidal harbour with almost no facilities ? The boat did look very scruffy when I brought it here, but it has improved immensely since then. The one Councilor who spoke to me, and then only because I accosted him on the quay, when I introduced myself immediately said "there is no corruption in Fingal County Council" "WHAT ?" "Ohh never mind". He then said that they had recently had several old fishing boats broken up and didn't want to have to do that again, yet that is precisely what they applied to the High Court to do ! They now claim that, a boat, in a harbour, needs planning permission. Ditto, a vessel anchoring offshore. WTF ! That is not only what harbours have been used for, it is what they were built for. According to them, a ship, wanting to anchor in Irish waters, has to apply to the local authority for permission ? We are already hated by merchant ship's captains for an officious administration, now the local authorities want to regulate them too. In my case, they decided that they wanted to get rid of me, then went looking for a mechanism to achieve that.
    I grew up on a barge on the Shannon, my parents started the first company there, to rent cabin cruisers, in 1960. At this point, I have lived on a boat 27 of my 57 years.
    BTW: This little ship was built in 1955, with Cold War hostilities in mind. She was one of 93 "ham" class Inshore Minesweepers. All named after British towns with names ending in "ham". The ones that the Irish Naval Service had were successors to the hams, called "ton" class, with similar naming practice.
    Welcome sbkenn.

    Good luck in keeping your home.

    Are Fingal CC citing what legislation exactly they are talking about ? I'm sceptical that Irish Land Use Planning law applies to water.
    What is the legislation that bans liveaboards ? Is it quite new ? I had my eye on a spot in the Grand Canal Dock for when weather gets too rough here at the rock, but the lack of any security of tenure or regularised letting of berths,

    Liveaboards are an ornament to the river in many cities and generate large amounts of tourist income.

    Have you considered calling their bluff and making a planning application ? At least that would take a while to process, and could be appealed to An Bord Pleanala.
    There used to be a maritine museum in Howth - voluntary. Would they perhaps give you and other historic vessels some support ?
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  9. #9
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    Default Re: The Man In The Minesweeper

    I was thinking more of murals, maybe of smaller boats 'dressed' with flags. It is quite likely that there are 3 people alive that wouldn't be had I not been here. There would certainly have been more vandalism, and rubbish. I frequently gather rubbish up off the sand and quay, and many people have said that following my dreams is an inspiration to others, especially kids. That is all irrelevant to the Co.Co, as they see our place as 'doing what we are told'.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: The Man In The Minesweeper

    http://www.irishexaminer.com/breakin...ap-791216.html

    Supreme Court success.

    A man living on a one hundred tonne former minesweeper vessel in a Dublin harbour has won his Supreme Court appeal aimed at preventing it being removed and scrapped.
    The United Irishman. Updated 5/2/14

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