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Thread: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

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    Default "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    From the Revolutionary Programme blog of the redoubtable 'bolshevik,' this post is well worth a discussion thread. The numbers of left candidates seem to be very limited. According to the writer, the aims and aspirations of the candidates are limited too. On this basis, he says he will be spoiling his vote. For myself, I always apply the "least worst" principle to voting.

    The lack of serious programmes from the left needs to be addressed. Political analysis and presentation of alternatives is not costly, and there is every reason why the left should be doing it, given the bankruptcy of the present system.

    A communist’s view on the 2014 Irish elections

    By revolutionaryprogramme

    I start from the understanding that any participation in the bourgeois election process necessarily gives some legitimacy to the bourgeois political system and therefore to the capitalist socio-economic system which it exists to perpetuate. Likewise calls to simply “vote left” (whatever that means) implicitly give validity to the bourgeois election process as the instrument of social change.
    Therefore for a communist to even consider giving electoral support it must be clear that there is something about the candidate’s participation in the elections which would promote the objective interests of the working class and therefore create an environment for the ideas of revolutionary Marxism among the militant sections of the working class.
    As a minimum starting point candidates must be seen as explicitly standing for furthering the interests of the working class as a class. This of course excludes the mainstream parties – Fine Gael, Fianna Fail, Labour & Sinn Fein. Most independents are also excluded on this basis as are the cross-class populist People’s Contract and Direct Democracy candidates.
    However taken by itself a pro-working class position still includes both those who put forward the fantasy that capitalism can be reformed to meet the interests of the working class as well as those who understand that capitalism will have to over-thrown and replaced with a new socio-economic system based upon consciously meeting human needs and wants rather than the maximisation of profit. It is therefore necessary to analyse the candidates who claim to stand for working-class interests to see where they stand on this spectrum.
    Some of the central planks against which such candidates should be judged are a commitment to working class political independence, internationalism, recognition of the need to build working class organisations separate from and in opposition to the institutions of bourgeois rule and especially its repressive state apparatus.
    In the 2011 council elections I was for a critical vote to the Socialist Party on the basis that they were advocating militant class struggle in response to the economic crisis that was then just beginning. But after five years of the crisis, and the campaign against the property charges/tax (partially successful but ultimately defeated), the SP have failed the test. Neither they, their front in the AAA or any other “socialist” organisations have anything to offer the Irish working class or to promote the ideas of revolutionary Marxism. I cannot advocate voting for any of them and will be spoiling my ballot. They exhibit a mixture of avoiding direct action, timid reformism, support for the Gardai, and “little Ireland” nationalism.


    Alliance Against Austerity
    The Socialist Party initiated electoral bloc has two main documents outlining their political perspectives: http://antiausterityalliance.ie/what-we-stand-for/ and their main publication “Real Jobs Programme” http://antiausterityalliance.ie/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Jobs_doc_AAA_1.pdf
    The AAA rightly points to the anti-worker nature of JobBridge and similar schemes that force the unemployed to work for a pittance – but their solution is “naming, shaming and exposing” employers who exploit the scheme (as opposed to those who use it in a non-exploitative way?) and calling on the government to disband it.
    Their alternative programme does call for
    “…an economic plan that can eliminate unemployment in our society means challenging the private ownership of wealth and the dominance of profit through democratic public ownership and planning.”
    However what is missing is any conception that this will require militant class struggle and the creation of our own working class organisations able to challenge the rule of capital. Instead it is presented as merely a question of policy choices rather than an inherent fault of the capitalism system itself.


    Socialist Party
    The SP are running Paul Murphy as an MEP under their own name (well the tweaked name of “Stop the Water Tax – Socialist Party”) rather than as part of the AAA. The main material produced for the election campaign appears to be Paul’s regular newsletters: http://www.paulmurphymep.eu/election...newsletters-2/
    The one thing that is different is that Paul’s material does use the “S” word something which hardly leaps out at you in the AAA material, if it is there at all. But what content does Paul’s “socialism” have?
    Reading these newsletters there is a strong emphasis on action and protests which I found positive but looking a bit closer I was not so impressed. The past week has seen protests against the installation of water meters start in Cork and spread around the country. Newsletter #3 dealt specifically with the issue of water (something the SP obviously sees this as a central issue given the change in name for the ballot paper).
    It has a picture of Paul with a placard standing next to Irish Water staff installing a meter – a photo opportunity rather than as part of an attempt to stop the installation. Now that may have been an issue of a balance of forces on that day but the text of the newsletter makes it clear that the SP does not see militant direct action by local communities as any part of the way forward:
    “Water Tax must become an issue in the elections. Paul Murphy MEP alongside the Anti Austerity Alliance will be holding a number of public meetings and activities around the country. A good showing for socialist, left and anti austerity candidates in these elections can strike a blow to the political establishment on the issue of Water Tax and other austerity policies and can be used as a platform to launch a campaign to boycott the charge in advance of bills being issued.”
    Newsletter #7 further highlighted this approach of diverting the fight against the water tax down an electoralist dead-end with a report of a new poster specifically on this issue:

    And as the protests in Cork, and elsewhere, began in earnest the SP, through the AAA, responded with… a petition aimed at the Labour Party threatening their votes!
    http://antiausterityalliance.ie/labour-axe-water-tax-watch-vote-collapse-petition/
    At a time when the protests against the installation of water meters indicates the possible beginning of an upsurge in militant struggle by working class communities the emphasis on passive electoralism put forward in Paul’s campaign means his references to a socialist future are devoid of any substance.


    People Before Profit Alliance
    The core of the PBPA election perspective is contained in their “Five Reasons to Vote People Before Profit” http://www.peoplebeforeprofit.ie/node/882
    PBPA does present a more militant perspective than the SP/AAA on fighting the water charges:
    “Make the local and Euro elections on May 23rd pay-back day. If Labour is destroyed, it will de-stabilise this rotten government. Every vote for People Before Alliance is a vote for active resistance to these charges. People Before Profit is an anti-water charges party that will use all elected positions won to encourage resistance to these charges.
    “Prepare for mass protests. Mass protest and civil disobedience stopped an Irish government building a nuclear power station at Carnsore Point. More recently, mass protests stopped the sell-off of Coillte. The people of Bolivia have shown how protest and escalating civil disobedience could topple a government that tried to privatise their water supply. We can do the same here.
    “Oppose the charges. The lesson of the property tax is that a boycott campaign can only be successful if it grows out of a campaign of massive public protest and determined opposition. This will include local resistance on the ground in opposition to metering where it is possible to mobilise enough people.”
    http://www.bridsmith.net/against-water-charges/
    But what is missing from the PBPA material is any vision of anything more than a reformed capitalism that is “better” for working people.
    The campaign against the property tax and now the beginnings of militant direct action in opposition to the installation of the water meters shows that the more militant sections of the Irish working class already recognise the need to fight. Calls to fight back that are not linked to some vision of a socialist future (even if like PBPA you are scared to even use the term) are not enough in the current situation.


    United Left
    I am unable to find an election platform for the United Left so have assessed them on the basis of election leaflets:
    http://irishelectionliterature.wordp...rmot-drimnagh/
    http://irishelectionliterature.wordp...cal-elections/
    This is pretty timid reformism with, for instance, all that is demanded of the multi-nationals who dominate the Irish economy being that they merely be stopped from avoiding the official corporation tax rate.
    I fail to see how the position put forward in this material can do anything other than encourage the idea that the struggles of working people are limited to changes within the framework of capitalism.


    Workers Party
    Although the Workers Party do have an organisational web site it strangely has no information at all about their candidates so once again I am forced to rely on election leaflets:
    http://irishelectionliterature.wordpress.com/2014/04/21/leaflet-from-michael-finnegan-the-workers-party-lucan-2014-local-elections/
    http://irishelectionliterature.wordp...st/#more-30080
    Another set of timid reformist demands but the calls for extending the powers of the Gardai and supporting local businesses completely rule out any possible electoral support for them from any revolutionary socialist.


    Workers and Unemployed Action Group
    The WUAG election platform is outlined in the newsletter: http://wuag.wordpress.com/local-elections-2014/election-newsletter/
    As with the Workers Party the WUAG’s implied support for increased Garda numbers rules out any electoral support from revolutionary socialists.


    Communist Party of Ireland
    The CPI election platform invokes the idea of a “little Ireland” nationalist road to socialism and while accurately pointing to the decreased powers for locally elected councillors there is no conception of the necessity to create our own organisations based on proletarian democracy as the basis for working class power. Their “socialism” is just a more democratic version of capitalism:
    “The candidates are standing on a clear platform of calling for the repudiation of the anti-people debt, breaking with the euro, and reclaiming our country’s national sovereignty.”

    “The CPI is aware that no real power or democracy is left at the local government level, that real power lies with the unelected city and county managers, who take their orders and priorities from the minister of the day.“http://www.communistpartyofireland.ie/sv/01-vote.html
    Bolshevik does not mention that Eirigi is standing a number of candidates, so its programme does not get a critique, so I assume he does not count them as basing themselves on the working class as a class.
    EIrigi's slogan "Break the Connection with Capitalism" is shown alongside this message -

    The socialist republican party, éirígí, has announced it will be standing candidates in both the Six and Twenty-Six County local elections in May. The party will be standing activists for election in Dublin, Belfast, Wicklow and Wexford. Other areas may also be contested and, if confirmed, the details will be made public in the coming weeks. The list below includes the candidate names and their respective constituencies: Máire Drumm – Colin, Belfast City
    Pádraic Mac Coitir – Black Mountain, Belfast City
    Damien Farrell – Crumlin/Kimmage, Dublin City
    Ciaran Heaphey – Beaumont/Donaghmede, Dublin City
    Councillor Louise Minihan – Ballyfermot/Drimnagh, Dublin City
    Sean Doyle – Wicklow, Co Wicklow
    Councillor John Dwyer – New Ross, County Wexford
    Dominic Gaughan – Gorey, County Wexford.
    Runaí Ginearálta éirígí Breandán Mac Cionnaith said, “For the first time in many years voters from Wexford to Antrim will have the opportunity to vote for candidates and a party that are genuinely committed to the socialist-republican cause. The decision to stand in these elections represents another important step in the development of an all-Ireland alternative to the establishment political parties and the wider political and socio-economic status quo.
    “éirígí is active in an increasing number of working class communities across Ireland. Our candidates are standing in those constituencies where the party has developed its most solid foundations. We are confident that May’s local elections will demonstrate a steadily increasing support for the socialist republican message.
    “A vote for éirígí in May’s local elections will not be a vote for a political party that will disappear into the council chambers as soon as the election is over. It will be a vote of confidence in working people’s ability to challenge the social and economic inequality that is rampant in this country. It will be vote against the politics of occupation, division and austerity. It will be a vote in favour of rebuilding strong, united, cohesive communities.
    “We want a vote for éirígí to represent the start, not the end, of people’s involvement in political activism. Real and lasting change will only come about when people’s political life extends beyond the ballot box and into every avenue where they can challenge the status quo.”
    Brendan noted further that the working class people “who are facing the daily brunt of occupation, unemployment, creaking public services and housing shortages are well aware of the fact that the people in power don’t give a damn about them.”
    The éirígí candidates are folks who have given a lifetime of effort to the struggle for a better Ireland, seeking neither fame nor financial reward for doing so. They are embedded in the daily life of the working class areas in which they are standing and work tirelessly in pursuit of the needs of their communities.
    “This May,” Brendan suggests, “working people should vote for those whose only allegiance is to their class and their community – not those who administer power in the interests of the corrupt and the wealthy. . . In four months time the communities where éirígí is running candidates will have an opportunity to send a very strong message to the ruling class, a message that shows that the will of the people has not been broken by years of exploitation and austerity; a message that tells of the coming day when working people will assert their right to justice and equality; a message that working people remain committed to the cause of Tone, Pearse and Connolly; a message that will send a cold chill through the halls of Leinster House and Stormont.
    To realise the potential of the May elections, the party intends to deliver hundreds of thousands of pieces of literature, to canvass tens of thousands of homes and to engage with tens of thousands of people. If you live in Ireland, you can help by assisting directly in the campaign – whether by delivering literature, helping out on stalls, postering, even helping make tea and sandwiches for election workers I guess. People outside Ireland who want to help can boost the party’s finances by buying stuff from the online shop.

    http://theirishrevolution.wordpress....ion-campaigns/
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    Not including éirígí was an oversight on my part.

    My analysis would be that while they present a militant class struggle perspective their platform is no more of a road to socialism than any of the other left candidates. There is also a tendency to sometimes fudge the class line with references to "all our citizens" in their election leaflets - http://irishelectionliterature.wordp...tegory/eirigi/

    I have never understood the "least worst" approach to capitalist elections taken by many self-describing socialists as it implicitly gives positive validation of the structures of bourgeois democracy. Unless the socialist voting on this basis truly believes that socialist change can be achieved through these structures it seems a strange way to approach the process. Elections pose the question of how our society is run and how we are ruled - the opportunity to use this process to present a socialist alternative should be taken in my opinion and judging how that is done, or not done, is therefore part of a revolutionary socialist analysis of the candidates who are standing.

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by bolshevik View Post
    Not including éirígí was an oversight on my part.

    My analysis would be that while they present a militant class struggle perspective their platform is no more of a road to socialism than any of the other left candidates. There is also a tendency to sometimes fudge the class line with references to "all our citizens" in their election leaflets - http://irishelectionliterature.wordp...tegory/eirigi/

    I have never understood the "least worst" approach to capitalist elections taken by many self-describing socialists as it implicitly gives positive validation of the structures of bourgeois democracy. Unless the socialist voting on this basis truly believes that socialist change can be achieved through these structures it seems a strange way to approach the process. Elections pose the question of how our society is run and how we are ruled - the opportunity to use this process to present a socialist alternative should be taken in my opinion and judging how that is done, or not done, is therefore part of a revolutionary socialist analysis of the candidates who are standing.
    While I appreciate that political principle is important to you, I view elections as one of very many avenues through which class struggle takes place. The bigger the smack in the face the Government parties have the better. Also, socialists imo should be involved in debate with the wide range of independents that are coming on the scene - they range from left to right to anything in between. The idea that there is a "third way" has a dangerous history and should be exposed.

    eírígí, I agree, vacillates in class position and seems to me to have moved away from the explicit socialist revolutionary perspective, based on the working class, expressed in speeches a couple of years ago. It has a strand of anarchism running through it, as well as nationalism. However, it is militantly opposed to neo liberalism, and its roots are primarily in the working class and the party should imo if possible be drawn in to debate with the rest of the left - good for clarifying and developing positions of all concerned.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    As Garret Fitzgerald said ........"it might work in practice .... it will never work in theory."


    Therefore for a communist to even consider giving electoral support it must be clear that there is something about the candidate’s participation in the elections which would promote the objective interests of the working class and therefore create an environment for the ideas of revolutionary Marxism among the militant sections of the working class.
    ..... Yeah and never mind those who are hungry, cold, homeless, sick or dying.
    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, misdiagnosing it, and then misapplying the wrong remedies.”

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    Garret Fitzgerald......yes.......a real friend of the poor, cold and hungry.



    Are you in all cases opposed to abstentionism, riposte ? On what grounds ?
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Garret Fitzgerald......yes.......a real friend of the poor, cold and hungry.
    Cass .... you clearly don't get the point of the quote ..... which was .... that some people are more interested in theory than the welfare of the people ( like Communists) ...... and that included Fitzgerald.


    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Are you in all cases opposed to abstentionism, riposte ? On what grounds ?
    I am a member of an abstenionist party ...... our MPs abstain from participation in Westminister. As for abstaining from voting in elections..... not voting is like not eating ..... very unhealthy for the body politic.

    Anyone who distains the candidates on offer ....... and doesn't go forward for election themselves .... is both a hypocrite and a coward.
    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, misdiagnosing it, and then misapplying the wrong remedies.”

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    I wish to God there was such a thing as "militant sections of the working class."

    At the moment there is not much sign of that.

    Although I am in a reformist party, I would be open to a militant mass movement. What I am not open to is pretending that militant sections of the working class exist when, for now at least, they simply do not.

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by riposte View Post
    [B]..... Yeah and never mind those who are hungry, cold, homeless, sick or dying.[/SIZE]
    If this was all that I was about then perhaps this comment might have a point to it. However this is a case of horses for courses in my view.

    Defence of working people against the various attacks on our living standards in immediate campaigns is where we can all come together in principled unity around the immediate demands of the campaign, despite whatever strategic differences we might have about long-term change to society. I am happy to stand on my record as an active participant in such political activity.

    However in my mind elections are somewhat different in that rather than an immediate demand, or set of demands, to deal with a particular issue they are about how society as a whole is run. If all that is possible for the "hungry, cold, homeless, sick of dying" is reforms under capitalism to ameliorate their living conditions then of course my argument makes no sense. But if a fundamental change in the socio-economic system is indeed possible then I don't think it is unreasonable to argue that it is the responsibility of anyone describing themselves as a socialist who participates in the election process to expound their perspective on how that could come about.

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by Richardbouvet View Post
    I wish to God there was such a thing as "militant sections of the working class."

    At the moment there is not much sign of that.

    Although I am in a reformist party, I would be open to a militant mass movement. What I am not open to is pretending that militant sections of the working class exist when, for now at least, they simply do not.
    It is not that militant sections of the working class don't exist at all - just that they are a (very) small layer of the working class and those with anything approaching a revolutionary consciousness are much smaller.

    But in terms of political method of how to approach the capitalist election process I don't think it is any different whether the respective numbers are in the 10s, or 100s, or 1000s or 100,000s, or 1,000,000s.

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by riposte View Post
    Cass .... you clearly don't get the point of the quote ..... which was .... that some people are more interested in theory than the welfare of the people ( like Communists) ...... and that included Fitzgerald.
    I got your point, which you have made elsewhere, that you don't think communism can work. Who are "some people"? If you are replying to bolshevik specifically, why not be clear about it ?

    My point is that Fitzgerald, who you seem to quote with approval, was no friend of workers. Also he was a muddle head who did not understand the relation between theory and practice, which is iterative i.e. Theory is derived from developing hypotheses and testing them in practice. Conflicts between the two are resolved, by study of objective reality, or by the theory being all or in part overturned.

    I am a member of an abstenionist party ...... our MPs abstain from participation in Westminister. As for abstaining from voting in elections..... not voting is like not eating ..... very unhealthy for the body politic.

    Anyone who distains the candidates on offer ....... and doesn't go forward for election themselves .... is both a hypocrite and a coward.
    There is a third category of people who believe that participation in elections is counter productive. I don't agree, but I don't think they are necessarily people who are cowardly or hypocritical - if that was the case that would apply to your party in the past, and I don't think there is any evidence of them being either.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by bolshevik View Post
    If this was all that I was about then perhaps this comment might have a point to it. However this is a case of horses for courses in my view.

    Defence of working people against the various attacks on our living standards in immediate campaigns is where we can all come together in principled unity around the immediate demands of the campaign, despite whatever strategic differences we might have about long-term change to society. I am happy to stand on my record as an active participant in such political activity.

    However in my mind elections are somewhat different in that rather than an immediate demand, or set of demands, to deal with a particular issue they are about how society as a whole is run. If all that is possible for the "hungry, cold, homeless, sick of dying" is reforms under capitalism to ameliorate their living conditions then of course my argument makes no sense. But if a fundamental change in the socio-economic system is indeed possible then I don't think it is unreasonable to argue that it is the responsibility of anyone describing themselves as a socialist who participates in the election process to expound their perspective on how that could come about.
    How does not voting improve the situation of the working class ? If it was adopted en bloc by the working class, it would lead to a romp home by Fine Gael with a large majority with which they would make hay.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    How does not voting improve the situation of the working class ? If it was adopted en bloc by the working class, it would lead to a romp home by Fine Gael with a large majority with which they would make hay.
    I don't think that not voting by itself improves the condition of the working class. It is unfortunately the case that most of the (majority of?) workers who won't vote in the upcoming election will do so out of feelings of cynicism and demoralisation rather than to make the positive political statement of commitment to fighting for a socialist future that motivates my position.

    It is also true that a large parliamentary majority does make it easier for a bourgeois party to implement its policies. However I believe this is secondary to the balance of class forces, general economic situation and the needs of capital which are the main factors in deciding what those policies will be.

    I know this from my own experience in New Zealand where the equivalent of the Tory party was in power from the mid-70s to the mid-80s (with a substantial majority in the first past the post system NZ had then) when they were replaced by the supposedly more left-wing (at least in a liberal-left kind of way) Labour Party - who proceeded to begin the privatisation of the welfare state and moved to curb the strength of the trade unions, both things the much more right-wing National Party had not done in the previous decade. The needs of capital dictated this rather than the size of the parliamentary majority or the left, centre or right nature of the capitalist government. Even if a parliamentary majority is small there is always recourse to a "government of national unity" to get through the policies required by the capitalists.

    In my opinion it is essential to always be trying to get across the idea that it is our own strength as an organised class that is the only real defence against any attacks the capitalist class, and their government, inflict upon our class. Of course a mass militant workers movement and its revolutionary component would contest capitalist elections but that would be in the context of militant class struggle being the primary focus and any elected representatives being very much aware and openly conscious of their role as being class war combatants in the enemy camp.

    But that is quite different from "socialists" telling the working class, with varying degrees of explicitness/implictiness, that all that can be achieved is radical reforms and presenting the institutions of bourgeois democracy as the main arena of the struggle for any social change (the Socialist Party and their approach to the water charges being a current example of this). In my opinion that consolidation of reformist ideology and buying into/encouraging acceptance of capitalism as the natural order outweighs the secondary effect that having more left-reformist parliamentarians might have.

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    There is a difference between having a right wing dominated government and a centre left government. The latter is obviously preferable. Why not quietly vote for those parties as the least worst option while rather than spoiling your ballot?

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by Saoirse go Deo View Post
    There is a difference between having a right wing dominated government and a centre left government. The latter is obviously preferable. Why not quietly vote for those parties as the least worst option while rather than spoiling your ballot?
    As per my previous post I think the advantage of this difference in the left-centre-right nature of the capitalist government is far outweighed by the broader issues involved in the reformist political messages being presented to the working class by the various socialist candidates.

    My main intervention into this election is not the actually casting of votes (or not), but rather the political impact my blog post, and discussions about it like this thread, might have on the small section of the Irish workers movement who it reaches - this would be true even if, like in 2011, I was advocating a vote for some candidates.

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    Default Re: "A Communist's View of the Elections" Irish Local Elections 2014

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    How does not voting improve the situation of the working class ? If it was adopted en bloc by the working class, it would lead to a romp home by Fine Gael with a large majority with which they would make hay.
    An apolitical motivation will never easily translate into a political motivation or action.

    Voting lends faux legitimacy to whatever faux government takes power. To me it's quite simple. I've never voted. Those in government do not represent me and they do not have my blessing. As for those who vote. I don't see them with charitable eyes either. None are fit to make any decision on my behalf. Democracy is ********.

    Check it out next time you have a meal with friends. Have a vote to see who pays for the meal. Don't pay any heed to those who complain or disagree. Even better, vote for them to pay.

    Eff the vote and eff the voters.

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