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Thread: Irish Water Services Legislation

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    Default Irish Water Services Legislation

    Water Services Act 2013

    The Water Services Act 2013 provides for the establishment of Irish Water/Uisce Éireann as a subsidiary of Bord Gáis Éireann. Irish Water/ Uisce Éireann will be responsible for the installation of water meters for domestic households connected to a public water supply. The Act provides BGÉ and Irish Water/Uisce Éireann with the authority to install meters in all domestic properties and provides any of the necessary powers, available to a water services authority under the 2007 Act, that are necessary to meet this objective.


    As the installation of water meters is related to the Government’s commitments to introduce water charges for households based on usage, the Act removes the statutory prohibition on such charges. The Act also amends section 105 of the Water Services Act 2007 to provide BGÉ and Irish Water/Uisce Éireann with the power to charge households for water services. Section 105 has not been commenced and will not be commenced prior to the introduction of charges, which will not be before 1 January 2014. Irish Water/Uisce Éireann will be responsible for billing and collecting revenue from households when the Government introduces domestic charges. In this regard, the Act provides BGÉ and Irish Water/Uisce Éireann with the necessary powers to obtain information from households in receipt of water services and other third parties for the purpose of creating a customer database.


    The Act also provides the Commission for Energy Regulation with a function to advise the Government in relation to the development of policy regarding the regulation of the provision of water services. The Act provides that the Commission may do all things necessary in preparation for the performance of water regulatory functions. The Act also provides that the Commission may undertake the necessary consultations with BGÉ and Irish Water/Uisce Éireann, water services authorities, or any other person.


    http://www.environ.ie/en/Environment...s/Legislation/

    Water Services Act

    http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/2013/...006/print.html


    Water Services (No. 2) Act 2013 (Commencement) Order 2013

    This order brings into operation certain general provisions of the Water Services (No. 2) Act 2013; also miscellaneous amendments to the Water Services Act 2007 and the Water Services Act 2013.

    Water Services (No. 2) Act 2013 (Transfer Day) Order 2013

    This order provides that the 1 January 2014 is appointed as the transfer day for the purposes of the Water Services Act 2013. The functions of the water services authorities will transfer to Irish Water on this day.


    Water Services Act 2013 (Commencement) Order 2013

    The first Commencement Order for the Water Services Act 2013 was signed by the Minister on 27 March 2013. The Order brings most of the key operational provisions of the Act into force, with effect from 29 March 2013. It provides for the commencement of all sections of the Act, other than sections 28 and 29.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    How long before we're told that Irish Water belongs to its private creditors ?

    "Equity funding" is surely step by step privatisation by another name ?

    While the new utility may be useless at collecting money from its customers, it is excelling at hoovering up money from the Government and banks, receiving a dizzying array of enormous sums from a range of different sources.


    Last year, for instance, its total Government subvention amounted to €439m, which all came from the Local Government Fund. This year the subvention figure that has been pencilled in is €399m, while an injection of €479m is planned for 2016.

    The Local Government Fund, which is propping up Irish Water, is financed entirely through the local property tax and motor tax. Given that the local property tax raised around €470m last year, and Irish Water got €439m, it is, in effect, devouring nearly all of that income.

    The State's generosity to Irish Water doesn't end there. The Department of the Environment gave it a €240m loan last year while it has also received a €300m loan from the National Pension Reserve Fund.

    Meanwhile, an equity investment in the company by the Government has also been agreed for 2015 and 2016, with Irish Water receiving €222m in December 2014 and a further €184 due next year.

    Add the €540m cost of the water metering programme, the €130m cost of the water conservation grant and the additional €6m the Department of Social Protection will spend administering the payment, and you begin to get some idea of the amount of money the State has already spent on Irish Water.

    The financial problems don't stop there. Despite the vast sums of money being sucked up by the rapacious new utility, it was concerned about its financial position last year.

    Minutes of directors' meetings released to journalist Gavin Sheridan at the weekend, after he appealed an earlier refusal to the Information Commissioner, reveal the extent of the alarm.

    In July 2014, the minutes note there are issues with "non-payment and late-payment of suppliers" and state the directors' intention to escalate their "dissatisfaction with the current funding position".

    The minutes also record Irish Water signing up to a Bank of Ireland overdraft of €50m, a €100m Ulster Bank "revolving credit" facility and a €50m loan from AIB. Separately, the 'Sunday Independent' reported at the weekend that Irish Water had borrowed a further €550m from banks this year, including Barclays, BNP Paribas, Danske, HSBC and Royal Bank of Scotland.

    I contacted Irish Water to query whether this €550m was in addition to the €200m of borrowing last year and, while it was unable to confirm the specific amount, it said these "significant" commercial borrowings were a vote of confidence in the company as a "sound investment".

    "Utilities use the revenue raised from customers to allow them to borrow money from commercial banks," it said, noting the company was set up with the express purpose of borrowing money in order to invest it into the water and waste-water network.

    So, given all of this money sloshing around in Irish Water, the big question is how much is it spending on actually repairing the water network? Is the Government's stated plan, to boost investment, working? No, in fact, investment is down. Documents obtained by RTÉ under Freedom of Information last year revealed that the company's capital spend in 2014 was just €300m. In contrast, between 2004 and 2013, the average annual spend on infrastructure by Government was €430m.

    Despite Irish Water hailing the €540m metering programme as a prudent investment to help it detect leaks, the documents also showed the company fixed the same number of leaks last year as it did the year before. Meanwhile, last year Irish Water vowed to eliminate boil notices by 2016, but earlier this year a new target of 2021 was announced - without any acknowledgement that its self-imposed deadline had mysteriously increased by five years. Leaks will not be reduced to an "acceptable level", 20pc, for another 25 years.

    Irish Water has stated it eventually aims to invest €600m annually in water infrastructure, but it remains to be seen if this will be achieved this year, given its increased commercial borrowing. Last year, its own capital investment plan earmarked just €410m for investment this year and next, which is also below the average annual spend on infrastructure prior to its establishment.

    The reason for this litany of failure, other than historic chronic underinvestment, can be found in the board minutes that were published at the weekend. During the week, an uncharacteristically coy Mr Kelly refused to reveal any targets that Irish Water may have set but, in July 2014, the directors noted the company had set a compliance target of 85pc for December 2014. To date, just 70pc of customers have even registered while just 46pc have paid a bill.

    To make matters worse, a farcical situation now exists whereby those who have registered but failed to pay their bill can still apply for a €100 grant - at the same time the Department is cutting payments to lone parents.




    http://www.independent.ie/opinion/co...-31391471.html
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    The latest proposal strikes me as quite a good compromise.

    It penalises wasters without imposing a regressive water charge on everyone else.

    I would support metering as a way of detecting wasters, but not for calculating a general charge.

    Do people agree?

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    Quote Originally Posted by Richardbouvet View Post
    The latest proposal strikes me as quite a good compromise.

    It penalises wasters without imposing a regressive water charge on everyone else.

    I would support metering as a way of detecting wasters, but not for calculating a general charge.

    Do people agree?
    To Hell with Labour and may the lot of them die screaming. Ditto for the rest of the FG/FF gangsters who want to steal Ireland's resources for themselves and their cronies. Is that simple enough for you?

    Regards...jmcc
    Last edited by jmcc; 29-11-2016 at 07:31 PM.

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    So I'm guessing that's a no.

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    Quote Originally Posted by Richardbouvet View Post
    So I'm guessing that's a no.
    Metering! The "technology"? The contracts to install the equipment? The payoffs for shares in a bankrupt company? Some compromises. Do you think that we, the Irish people, should grant mercy or should we destroy the whole lot of them and start again with a more equitable system?

    Regards...jmcc

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    Quote Originally Posted by Richardbouvet View Post
    The latest proposal strikes me as quite a good compromise.

    It penalises wasters without imposing a regressive water charge on everyone else.

    I would support metering as a way of detecting wasters, but not for calculating a general charge.

    Do people agree?
    The only wasters around here are the politicians who are trying to pull the wool over the eyes of the population.




    .
    Last edited by riposte; 29-11-2016 at 06:35 PM.
    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, misdiagnosing it, and then misapplying the wrong remedies.”

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    Quote Originally Posted by Richardbouvet View Post
    The latest proposal strikes me as quite a good compromise.

    It penalises wasters without imposing a regressive water charge on everyone else.

    I would support metering as a way of detecting wasters, but not for calculating a general charge.

    Do people agree?
    The vast amount of water is used for agriculture and industry, not domestic use.

    These proposals are the thin edge of the wedge.

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    Quote Originally Posted by Saoirse go Deo View Post
    The vast amount of water is used for agriculture and industry, not domestic use.

    These proposals are the thin edge of the wedge.
    I can't speak for all rural areas but I know at home most people are on a group water scheme... Which already have metering for the past ten years. It's very affordable and most non farming houses will never go over their allowance.
    If people who already pay for water on group water scheme's are going to end up paying on the double for water it won't go down well.

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    "If people who already pay for water on group water scheme's are going to end up paying on the double for water it won't go down well."

    I can't see how it would differ from the situation pre-water charges, but in any event there is a case for a tax allowance for those on such schemes if there isn't one already.

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    Quote Originally Posted by Richardbouvet View Post
    I would support metering as a way of detecting wasters, but not for calculating a general charge.

    Do people agree?
    No, not unless there is a regime in place that ensures that the capital costs and running expenses of providing water from a public supply and dealing with related wastes, are provided for. I do NOT mean by that a vague statement that it will be included and paid for in general taxation (whatever that is, taxation is to pay for specific things, costed and budgeted for)

    There is no such thing as a free lunch, even in restaurants which give you carafe, the cost is in the bill somewhere. So, let us bite the bullet.

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    Quote Originally Posted by Richardbouvet View Post
    "If people who already pay for water on group water scheme's are going to end up paying on the double for water it won't go down well."

    I can't see how it would differ from the situation pre-water charges, but in any event there is a case for a tax allowance for those on such schemes if there isn't one already.
    Let me see now... we are going to have meters outside every house, but we are just not going to use them ?
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    theyd want to get the government to pay the full whack for country people diggin their own wells or on schemes not have the cities gettin it for nothing and country people paying for everything!!!!

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    Quote Originally Posted by dedogs View Post
    theyd want to get the government to pay the full whack for country people diggin their own wells or on schemes not have the cities gettin it for nothing and country people paying for everything!!!!
    Well, that is the spin.

    Very few of Ireland's rural dwellers are really rural - they mostly depend a good deal on what goes on in cities to make their lives function. When they go into hospital, send their kids to school, go shopping, go to work, they are depending on urban water infrastructure.

    Farmers pay because they use water on a commercial basis and scale.

    I'm in favour of rural dwellers being able to get reimbursed proportionately for their personal water costs, but they will still have to pay with the rest of us through tax to keep the national system ticking over.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

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    Default Re: Irish Water Services Legislation

    When I was renting many years ago in London I remember getting a letter about Water Rates , addressed to the Occupier. I asked the landlord , who told me it wasn't a bill , just a statement. The amount ( which was less than £5 per quarter) came out of domestic rates.We abolished rates in the 70s I think.My local Blueshirt TD says it was a great blunder. And here we are back at square one.

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