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Thread: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

  1. #31

    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)



    Some of the discussion from the 'Republicanism: Where do we go from here?' event in Armagh.

  2. #32

    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    This is this evening my Dublin friends

    “I think the main thing for young people in republican circles is to use their God-given brain to think and to analyse and to question and to not simply listen to others or take their world view from a book, a magazine or a newspaper.

    You have a mind, you have an intelligence, you have the ability to analyse - use it. Examine each situation and do so critically. Hear other views, challenge them and challenge your own but don't just sit there and sup up every view that is put in front of you because in that case you're not a free agent.

    At the end of the day the best thing you can do for republicanism is to give it freedom, that is not taken from its orders from somewhere else”. - Tommy McKearney

  3. #33
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    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    Quote Originally Posted by Dublin1916Society View Post
    This is this evening my Dublin friends

    “I think the main thing for young people in republican circles is to use their God-given brain to think and to analyse and to question and to not simply listen to others or take their world view from a book, a magazine or a newspaper.

    You have a mind, you have an intelligence, you have the ability to analyse - use it. Examine each situation and do so critically. Hear other views, challenge them and challenge your own but don't just sit there and sup up every view that is put in front of you because in that case you're not a free agent.

    At the end of the day the best thing you can do for republicanism is to give it freedom, that is not taken from its orders from somewhere else”. - Tommy McKearney
    Good luck, hope you have a good session. One thing that Irish Republicanism has is an extraordinary wealth of experiences from which to learn, many of them got at a very high human cost.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  4. #34

    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    In your opinion what is the best way to create unite between anti-agreement republicans?

    I think it takes a fair amount of work and there is no simple answer to that. I think one of the best things for people to recognise for any sort of viable programme around which we can build unity, we are going to have to get the support of the people and that it is not possible to build unity around one small group of people claiming leadership of republican Ireland. It is something we have to talk through and we have got to be prepared to give and take in terms of meeting one and other. Overall, we have to recognise we have to win the confidence of the people and the support of the people and not just dictate to people. - Tommy McKearney, January '03 in 'Young Republican'.

  5. #35
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    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    To be brutally honest I think it is impossible - and not a desirable goal given some of the characters involved.

    What the focus needs to be on is widening the republican "gene pool" by radicalizing NEW people who may have no connection to republicanism and not having constant infights and appeals/denunciations to "lapsed republicans" in SF. This can be done by bringing republican politics into the 21st century by putting a modern twist on the fundamentals of republican politics - 1916 is a good place to start. Ditto with 1798 and such. I would largely put the "troubles" to one side as the focus invariably ends up being on the tactics used rather than the politics which underpinned that phase of the struggle. Also, while there was incalculable personal sacrifice and bravery did the PIRA really add that much to republican politics that was not already there? Do we really need to look far beyond the hungerstrikers? Does the foundation of "dissident republicanism" really have to be defense of the PIRA and denunciation of those who ended the campaign and became constitutional politicians? All this can ever do is alienate those who are not republican in the first place. You'll get some dissatisfied shinners and people will shuffle around the various groups but the masses will be alienated. If it were up to me, aside from some commemorations I'd try and put the last 40 years or so to one side because the politics have become lost in that mess.

    What needs to be done is to get back to basics and develop a body of republican politics which are relevant to the 21st century. The focus must not mainly be on the British connection but the neo colonialism in the south and the capitalist banking crisis - the republican response to this has been muted to put it mildly. This is the greatest threat Ireland faces today and the Brits are only a part of this problem. A good way to do this is as Pearse did - to look to the "gospels" of republicanism/Irish nationalism for inspiration and construct a modern "untainted" republican politic by looking at modern Ireland and applying these basic principles north and south. This will give us a pure, patriotic and firm foundation to build off of, something which has been lost amid all the fighting.

    We need to draw a line under the troubles and the GFA, stop being bitter and get back to basics. Being a republican shouldn't be about whether or not you think it is ok to blow up a PSNI officer or what your opinion on some PIRA misdeed is. If we are honest with ourselves that's what it is about today.

    I won't be at the meeting tonight (have to study) but if I were I'd make the above points. Get back to basics. Look to the United Irishmen, look to the Young Irelanders, look to 1916 particularly Connolly and the socialist tradition and apply their basic principles to modern Ireland in order to create a modern message and body of politics which people can discuss and agree/disagree with regardless of their attitude towards violence or the actions of the PIRA. Because you are not asking people to accept or support violence as a prerequisite but rather to imagine a better Ireland and to struggle for it - what this struggle will develop into who knows but the new phase needs a new foundation and this cannot be 40 years of war, recriminations, bitterness and infighting.
    Last edited by Saoirse go Deo; 11-01-2014 at 03:45 PM.

  6. #36

    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    Great post, I'm absolutely shattered just now to give it the response it deserves but very well said.

    Just to report it was a huge success, the room was packed and a lot of people had to turn back downstairs they couldn't see into the room. The thing this is a process, the ills of republicanism won't be solved in one night but this see now is people have the stamina and will to follow the process that would see republicanism move as a collective and a diverse collective because the diversity in that room was huge. But we don't claim to have all the answers but we can find the answers if we talk about them but most importantly look to implement the solutions - it's no good in being a talking shop.

    As we're told in the Societies there's no knight in shining armour coming to rescue republicanism so it has to be about the collective and that has to be stressed; people need to come off the sidelines and be leaders themselves.

    But last night showed there is hope and hopefully can be the vehicle to progress that.

  7. #37

    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)






  8. #38

    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    Just an update on the process. Tommy is very much still on board and will give a brief synopsis on the previous meeting as the next is a continuation of the last one. It'll be a panel type debate so a slightly different format but looking to have purely audience participation, which I think people wanted more the last time.

    Dominic McGlinchey's son, Dominic Jr, gave a good interview to the Irish News today about the need for discussions so I wrote this in as there is a process already going.

    A chara,

    Dominic McGlinchey raises a lot of valid points in his interview with the Irish News on January 24th. He asserts there needs to be conversations on the way forward for republicans. The 1916 Societies have been holding public meetings on the matter on both sides of the border in Armagh and Dublin. It has to be said both meetings were full to the brim and more are planned.

    It's not enough though, these need to be happening all over the country and people in the decision making process in the various groups need to come and engage with the public. These meetings have shown there is an appetite for discussion on the way forward. They've also shown that there are many republicans who see republicanism as a rudderless ship heading aimlessly into darkness; who can argue otherwise?

    Dominic is also correct in saying republicans have a duty to reflect, gather our thoughts and analyse our strategy. The danger is some act purely on a principle-based strategy and not one come to with carefully thought-out analysis - which could be argued is where the lack of engagement stems from as it's usually a strategy fraught with holes and very much open to scrutiny and many know it and are happy with going around aimlessly an ideological roundabout answering to nobody but themselves.

    We've acted as a conduit for these discussions and will continue to do so, if needed, but people can't be dragged kicking and screaming and there needs to be a degree of pragmatism needed to realise that there will always be a sect mentality in some sections of republicanism with attitudes that are self preservationist and vanguardist.

    We, as republicans, should remember the energy on the streets of Belfast last August. We came together for a common purpose as one to demand an end to internment and left our party politics at the door. Is there any reason why, through an extensive period of dialogue, we can't do the same on the core issue that defines us as republicans?

    There are many calling for change without offering an alternative or being apart of the process of offering an alternative and we'd urge them also to become apart of the possible implementation of a coming to a general consensus on the way forward. This struggle can only advance by active participation in the process and with the coming together of hearts and minds with those who hold the republican cause in its truly progressive nature.

    Regards,

  9. #39

    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    Quote Originally Posted by Dublin1916Society View Post
    Just an update on the process. Tommy is very much still on board and will give a brief synopsis on the previous meeting as the next is a continuation of the last one. It'll be a panel type debate so a slightly different format but looking to have purely audience participation, which I think people wanted more the last time.

    Dominic McGlinchey's son, Dominic Jr, gave a good interview to the Irish News today about the need for discussions so I wrote this in as there is a process already going.

    A chara,

    Dominic McGlinchey raises a lot of valid points in his interview with the Irish News on January 24th. He asserts there needs to be conversations on the way forward for republicans. The 1916 Societies have been holding public meetings on the matter on both sides of the border in Armagh and Dublin. It has to be said both meetings were full to the brim and more are planned.

    It's not enough though, these need to be happening all over the country and people in the decision making process in the various groups need to come and engage with the public. These meetings have shown there is an appetite for discussion on the way forward. They've also shown that there are many republicans who see republicanism as a rudderless ship heading aimlessly into darkness; who can argue otherwise?

    Dominic is also correct in saying republicans have a duty to reflect, gather our thoughts and analyse our strategy. The danger is some act purely on a principle-based strategy and not one come to with carefully thought-out analysis - which could be argued is where the lack of engagement stems from as it's usually a strategy fraught with holes and very much open to scrutiny and many know it and are happy with going around aimlessly an ideological roundabout answering to nobody but themselves.

    We've acted as a conduit for these discussions and will continue to do so, if needed, but people can't be dragged kicking and screaming and there needs to be a degree of pragmatism needed to realise that there will always be a sect mentality in some sections of republicanism with attitudes that are self preservationist and vanguardist.

    We, as republicans, should remember the energy on the streets of Belfast last August. We came together for a common purpose as one to demand an end to internment and left our party politics at the door. Is there any reason why, through an extensive period of dialogue, we can't do the same on the core issue that defines us as republicans?

    There are many calling for change without offering an alternative or being apart of the process of offering an alternative and we'd urge them also to become apart of the possible implementation of a coming to a general consensus on the way forward. This struggle can only advance by active participation in the process and with the coming together of hearts and minds with those who hold the republican cause in its truly progressive nature.

    Regards,
    Is there anywhere online to see the interview?

  10. #40

    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    Well known in anti-agreement circles Dominic McGlinchey has been a staunch opponent of Sinn Fein's political strategy. But with "little appetite" for armed conflict, the republican activist asks whether the time is right for an end to armed struggle as he urges "conversations" to take place on the future for militant republicanism.

    A prominent opponent of Sinn Fein’s political strategy has said there is “little appetite” for armed conflict in nationalist communities in the north.

    In a rare interview Dominic McGlinchey urged those opposed Sinn Fein’s strategy to hold a 'conversation about the future of the republican movement' and 'question the integrity of those standing beside them'.

    His comments come after a period of intense debate within anti-agreement circles about the merits of various republican paramilitary campaigns.

    In recent weeks a number of other high profile anti-agreement republicans, including former Provisional IRA hunger strikers Gerard Hodgins and Tommy McKearney, have said it is time for armed republican groups to “reconsider” their campaigns.

    Mr McGlinchey believes republicans have little to fear from making tough decisions.

    'Republicans have shown they are well capable of taking decisive action against the British,' he said.

    'That’s not something that they need to prove and nobody is saying you shouldn’t do this or do that.'

    Born into a staunch republican family from Bellaghy in south Derry, Mr McGlinchey’s decision to enter a public debate at this time will be viewed as significant.

    There are currently several active republican groups including the IRA, Oglaigh na hEireann and the Continuity IRA.

    The IRA, which was formed as after a merger between the Real IRA, Republican Action Against Drugs and independent republicans in 2012, and Oglaigh na hEireann have been particularly active in recent months.

    Although he keeps a low public profile, Mr McGlinchey is a well-known figure in anti-agreement circles.

    Speaking last night the father-of-three said that in some cases “armed action” was being used to 'stifle republicanism at the present time. It’s not that you are asking republicans to give something up, it’s not a matter of giving something up,' he said.

    "It’s a matter of being pragmatic and astute about where the battle is at and where it needs to be brought. Republicanism need to be aware of where it sits and the battles that are opening up in front of it and if certain tactics are holding you back from entering a new field of battle."


    The 36-year-old left Sinn Fein in 2006 partly because of its support for policing in the north.

    He later joined republican socialist party Eirigi before resigning from that group in 2009.

    He remains opposed to Sinn Fein and believes support for the party 'is support for British rule in Ireland and the administering of British rule in Ireland'.

    In 2012 Mr McGlinchey was questioned by police about a Real IRA gun attack which claimed the lives of two British soldiers in Massereene in County Antrim in 2009.

    He strongly denies any involvement in the attack and believes his name was connected to the ambush by 'the British media, MI5 and (PSNI) special branch'.

    The Co Derry man believes there is little support for a paramilitary campaign in nationalist communities.

    “I don’t believe the appetite exists among the people,” he said.

    "That’s not to say there is not considerable support among certain segments of republicanism for particular types of resistance, but what is very clear is that the appetite is not there for a full blown campaign. Never has the groundwork been done for a campaign like that to be launched."


    Mr McGlinchey says that republican groups must answer to the people they claim to represent.

    'As republicans we say our loyalty is to the Republic and the people make up the Republic and our loyalty has to be to those people,' he said.

    "For us to enforce rather than to persuade and debate and bring the people with you on a particular road map, what sort of Republic would we have at the end of it all?

    There are those involved in a process who have already delivered us to one surrender and they have no right to deliver us to another surrender."


    Mr McGlinchey is of the view that republican 'activists on the ground need to have an understanding of what they want'.

    He said the activities of republican paramilitary groups do not constitute a sustained “campaign”.

    He urged anti-agreement republicans to consider alternative methods to further their aims and reject any romantic notions about the Provisional IRA’s campaign.

    'Resistance is good,' he said.

    "But it doesn’t mean you have to be running around with an Armalite in your hand.

    You can’t refer back to the "good old days", the fact of the matter is there was nothing good in it.

    I am 36-years-of-age and I never saw the IRA walking the streets. There was a resistance movement but the IRA were on the back foot."


    As a child Mr McGlinchey saw both his parents being shot dead in separate gun attacks in Co Louth.

    His father Dominic, a former INLA Chief of Staff, was gunned down in Drogheda in February 1994 by gunmen who have never been apprehended.

    His mother Mary, also a former senior member of the INLA, was shot dead in her Dundalk home in January 1987 as she bathed the then nine-year-old along with his brother Declan.

    Again, her killers have never been caught.

    Mr McGlinchey says alternative ways of expressing republican politics should not be dismissed by hardliners.

    'There are hundreds of ways to expose the status quo for what it is,' he said.

    'Through civil disobedience or not recognising institutions. Republicanism cannot be viewed as a one-trick pony, there needs to be a proper analysis of where it is at.'

    The former Sinn Fein man believes that conversations about the future of militant republicanism can be held privately.

    'I don’t think republicans need to say they are calling a halt,' he said.

    'It’s clear that as republicans you have a duty to reflect, gather your thoughts and analyse our strategy. There needs to be a conversation about the future of the republican movement.'

    He revealed that hardline republicans have already entered into a “period of reflection” but that efforts to move away from violence are opposed by elements within the British security establishment.

    'MI5 and the security services have moved certain people from our streets that are of a more moderate persuasion to stifle that,' he said.

    'The security forces, MI5 and British intelligence have a vested interest in keeping things going.'

    He also believes that at times in the past British “agent provocateurs” within the Republican Movement have steered its direction.

    'Whether we like it or dislike it at the minute the Brits are controlling both sides of the argument, or certainly have major influences in terms of both sides of the argument,' he said.

    Mr McGlinchey believes the in recent years 'republicans are trying to swim in a dirty pond and there’s not even enough oxygen for anything to breath in it never mind grow'.

    He says this has been demonstrated more so in Dublin where hardline factions have descended into a “gang structure” whose members “masquerade as republicans”.

    'There’s been too much sacrificed just to be lost on a gangland in Dublin or a corrupt person in Belfast,' he said.

    "We are now many, many years since the signing of the Good Friday Agreement and the name of republicanism, especially in the 26 counties, has been trailed through the mud by people who should never never ever been allowed on the bus. There needs to be a crdible middle ground."


    The South Derry man says militant republicans have encountered tougher challenges in the past.

    'We have been shot by our own, hanged by our own, hanged by the Brits, we have been raped and beaten by the church and starved by colonialism – there’s nothing in this world we cannot face,' he said.

    'By taking a step back you actually do move forward. You need a bit of luck, but you can’t have luck if you don’t have a plan.'

    Mr McGlinchey is convinced the time is right for him to speak out now.

    'We were told to go and sit in the corner and that’s not acceptable any more,' he said.

    "I say this with the greatest respect to every other activist of my age, but it feels like I have lived five lifetimes within the Republican Movement. And all of my life I have been told you need to watch what you say and where you say it, everybody is out to get you.

    You have a duty I think to say what needs to be said - what’s on your mind. Republicanism is a very noble and just thing to be involved in. Republicans also have a duty to do the right thing, to stand up and be counted and when that time comes to be honest about where it’s at."
    From the Pensive Quill.

  11. #41

    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    Cheers for that

  12. #42
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    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    Quote Originally Posted by Dublin1916Society;368639

    [video=youtube;9jFTV_8y7DE
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jFTV_8y7DE[/video]
    Freeman wingnuttery about 24 mins in.


  13. #43
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    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Lord View Post
    Freeman wingnuttery about 24 mins in.

    They will have to eliminate this,maybe not now but its going to pose a threat at a later stage...
    History is the only true teacher, the revolution the best school for the proletariat - Rosa Luxembourg

  14. #44
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    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    Quote Originally Posted by fluffybiscuits View Post
    They will have to eliminate this,maybe not now but its going to pose a threat at a later stage...
    Surely it just has to be challenged and exposed as codology every time people come out with it ?
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  15. #45

    Default Re: Republicanism: Where do we go from here? Public talk and debate (Dublin)

    In fairness, it's an open debate and they took the opportunity to give their opinion like everyone else and they're entitled to come and do that.

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