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Thread: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

  1. #16
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaadi View Post
    You've most likely got an ulcer from h pylori bacteria, if you haven't done so already go to the doctor and get the test done. A stool sample is sent away and your doctor will put you on antibiotics to clear it up if your sample confirms that h pylori is the cause of your stomach-pain reflux.

    You're young, get it sorted out now and don't put it off because it will needlessly reduce your quality of life for the rest of your life if you don't.
    actually had to go a and e over something else a few weeks ago and they were not sure if this was related or not so they gave me antibiotics and proton pumps.

    Headed the doctor tomorrow again by coincidence. Thanks for the advice.

    Sent from my GT-I8190 using Tapatalk 2

  2. #17
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Both microwaved meals and fresh fruit and veg are too expensive to be bought in any quantities by people on benefits long term.
    Disagree with the point on frozen food on the basis that if a person takes a trip to Iceland (the food shop) they can get all sorts of stuff for little or nothing but the nutirional value is pretty poor IMO with regards to things like Hot Dog Pizzas. Iceland is great though for frozen veg and treats and they do a good deal on milk etc. There has been a massive drive to encourage the public to eat fresh fruit and veg however most people find they do not have the time to cook a nutritional meal and a lot of the dishes they advertise are not quick cook.
    History is the only true teacher, the revolution the best school for the proletariat - Rosa Luxembourg

  3. #18
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Both microwaved meals and fresh fruit and veg are too expensive to be bought in any quantities by people on benefits long term.
    I find his a fairly broad generalisation which flies in the face of the presence of so many cheap supermarket outlets such as Lidl, Aldi, Tesco, etc - all of which stock and sell massive amounts of frozen foods and other cheap rubbish, and all of which are doing huge business. Somebody else mentioned Iceland, a brand not present in my location, but one I see doing a roaring trade every time I'm home.

    I occasionally work for regular private citizens in their homes when I'm back, and to see what your average working class parent feeds their children - and what the children cry out for - is terrible. The parents are hardly leading by example either.

    Mini-pizzas, frozen then grilled. Burgers and chips, chips and beans, chips and frozen fish, chip sandwiches, chips and more chips, 'going out' treats in McDonalds or KFC, weekend treats from the local fish and chip shop, delivered pizzas, take-away oriental foods, the list of cráp is endless.

    I think the policy should be focused more on education about foodstuffs, both for the parents and for the kids. RTÉ could invest in some more thorough research and the making of documentaries to cop the parents on a bit, and the kids could definitely use some old-style home economics classes.

    Nobody seems to cook or bake in schools any more. Notice that? My sisters used to bring home bread and cakes they'd made in school when I was a kid. My parents would encourage them to try other things themselves in our own kitchen. Salad preparation was my boyhood chore. I could cut up a mean home-made coleslaw, and could lay out a fresh salad with cold cuts for a table of ten or twelve guests on a Sunday evening, with the fresh bread baked by the sister. Never a leaf nor a crust left on the plates.

    Kids today would look at you like you were mental if you asked them to do that.

  4. #19
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    I used to believe that too - but the reason people eat hot dog pizzas is because they are cheaper than steak.

    There have been numerous studies done which show that low carb low fat diets are far more expensive than high carb high fat diets.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19083381

    Abstract

    This article describes the use of operations research methods to study the minimum possible cost of a low-carbohydrate diet. The study compares this cost to the minimum cost of a diet with no limitation on carbohydrate. The rationale for this study is the popularity of the low-carbohydrate diets and their perceived high cost. The method used was an operations research approach to find a set of least cost diets, varying the required carbohydrate. This method was chosen to avoid potential concerns with real diets that may be nutritionally deficient or could be had for a lower cost. The major finding is that the cheapest possible low-carbohydrate diet costs about triple the cost of the cheapest diet with no constraint on carbohydrate. Furthermore, the minimum cost of a diet low in both carbohydrate and fat is 5 to 10 times the cost of the cheapest diet, depending on the relative amounts of these nutrients. As carbohydrate and fat are constrained, cost increases dramatically and nonlinearly. The study identifies which nutrients had the greatest effect on cost for a low-carbohydrate and low-fat diet
    People are not stupid, and people on low incomes do the best that they can do for their families.

    Lenin wrote a piece on why the working classes eat a high starch diet a hundred years ago. It seems it is an economic question of deprivation, and drive to increase rates of profit, nothing to do with the poor being stupid or lazy.
    Last edited by C. Flower; 22-10-2013 at 05:10 PM.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    I used to believe that too - but the reason people eat hot dog pizzas is because they are cheaper than steak.

    There have been numerous studies done which show that low carb low fat diets are far more expensive than high carb high fat diets.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19083381

    Abstract



    People are not stupid, and people on low incomes do the best that they can do for their families.

    Lenin wrote a piece on why the working classes eat a high starch diet a hundred years ago. It seems it is an economic question of deprivation, and drive to increase rates of profit, nothing to do with the poor being stupid or lazy.
    Not for one second would I doubt peoples intelligence but economic factors have driven poor diet over the years to the point now where it takes a lot of forward planning to get good value. As a frugal sort I tend to raid Tescos on a Thursday at payday, buy loads of veg and freeze it as its usually a tenth of the price as its nearly off. That study more or less backs up what I am saying, the cost of a high carb diet is cheaper but nutritionally high carb diets tend to be poor. There are very little cost effective alternatives to high carb diets that would allow a family to live within the constraints of a tight budget.
    History is the only true teacher, the revolution the best school for the proletariat - Rosa Luxembourg

  6. #21
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    Last night's RTÉ main evening news mentioned how one in four Irish children are obese, and I see the same myself every time I come home. How does this factor in?

    I'm not saying it has to do with relative intelligence or stupidity, but probably laziness and indiscipline. Parents, likely exhausted by the day's activities, find it easier and less of a hassle to fling a few frozen pizzas into the oven and call them treats.

    This is of course without any consideration of or reference to what the kids spend their pocket money on. The Monster Munch and Snickers bars, bags of candy sweets and ice lollies.

    All of which are banned in Finnish schools. No candy is allowed in the classes or yards, and no processed foods in the state-funded school canteens. Result? Not too many fat children to be seen.

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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by Mowl View Post
    Last night's RTÉ main evening news mentioned how one in four Irish children are obese, and I see the same myself every time I come home. How does this factor in?

    I'm not saying it has to do with relative intelligence or stupidity, but probably laziness and indiscipline. Parents, likely exhausted by the day's activities, find it easier and less of a hassle to fling a few frozen pizzas into the oven and call them treats.

    This is of course without any consideration of or reference to what the kids spend their pocket money on. The Monster Munch and Snickers bars, bags of candy sweets and ice lollies.

    All of which are banned in Finnish schools. No candy is allowed in the classes or yards, and no processed foods in the state-funded school canteens. Result? Not too many fat children to be seen.
    It is possible to be on a high carb diet and put on weight, but most obese children I guess are in middle not low income families. It is also related to lack of exercise, which is a real problem in Irish schools.

    Eating sweets, crisps and soft drinks in quantity is another issue - no one on a low income could possibly afford to let their children do that.
    Last edited by C. Flower; 22-10-2013 at 05:43 PM.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  8. #23
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    I think you really need to come back home and try to feed a family of five on 9 euro an hour along with rent, car bills, heating, school bills, ESB, Internet, Television etc. That seems to be the only way you will change your mind that hundreds of thousands of Irish parents are just idiots. Can't stress this enough. Grew up in this type of house and remember seeing the shopping receipts. 50-60 euro max was what we would spend on the shopping because otherwise there'd be no oil and we'd all have frozen to death.

    Sorry to say this Mowl as I like your posts in general, but you need some more empathy here. I don't know how my Da even managed to feed us all and pay his bills etc. having spent easily the same amount on a frugal week feeding just myself.

  9. #24
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    I don't get it - I'm not taking any side or making any accusations against Irish parents or their comparative intelligence regarding these matters. I have complete empathy with any struggling parent doing their best to take care of their family.

    All I'm asking is, how does the one in four of Irish children suffering from an obesity factor in to the research?

  10. #25
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Eating sweets, crisps and soft drinks in quantity is another issue - no one on a low income could possibly afford to let their children do that.
    Again, and I'm neither doubting nor arguing, but I'm merely poitning out the reality that when one visits working class neighbourhoods in Dublin for example, ie: Ballyfermot, Clondalkin, Tallaght, Darndale, etc, one sees the kids stuffing their faces with chips and crisps, chocolate and gum, etc.

    In the half hour immediately after schools get out, every newsagent and mini-market is crammed with kids buying junk foods: candy and gum, crisps and general munchies. Sit on a Dublin bus at half three or four in the evening, and if the bus passes a school - the kids (teens and juniors) all barrel on board and yell and talk and generally stuff their faces with the rubbish they spend their daily few bob on.

    I see it all the time.

    The lack of physical exercise factor in relation to school kids is definitely another issue. A separate issue perhaps, but related nonetheless.

  11. #26
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by Mowl View Post
    Again, and I'm neither doubting nor arguing, but I'm merely poitning out the reality that when one visits working class neighbourhoods in Dublin for example, ie: Ballyfermot, Clondalkin, Tallaght, Darndale, etc, one sees the kids stuffing their faces with chips and crisps, chocolate and gum, etc.

    In the half hour immediately after schools get out, every newsagent and mini-market is crammed with kids buying junk foods: candy and gum, crisps and general munchies. Sit on a Dublin bus at half three or four in the evening, and if the bus passes a school - the kids (teens and juniors) all barrel on board and yell and talk and generally stuff their faces with the rubbish they spend their daily few bob on.

    I see it all the time.

    The lack of physical exercise factor in relation to school kids is definitely another issue. A separate issue perhaps, but related nonetheless.
    I see it in all neighbourhoods. Kids come out of school and get a snack. That has been going on for generations, so I don't think it explains increasing obesity.

    The presence of sugary drink machines in school halls is an abomination: I can't understand why head teachers and parents allow it.

    I think exercise is the big reason for obesity. Children used to walk or cycle to school now almost all go by car and bus, and insurers prevent children from running in playgrounds. Playing out in the streets has been ended by the dominance of the car. Physical fitness for the better off involves rugger schools, and endless chauffering by parents to out of school activities.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  12. #27
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    I see it in all neighbourhoods. Kids come out of school and get a snack. That has been going on for generations, so I don't think it explains increasing obesity.
    In my day the daily post-school snacks were generally distributed by the parents when you got home, not bought by the kids themselves. The weekend pocket-money gave you that opportunity to buy for yourself. The rest of the week, the treats had to be merited by chores.

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    The presence of sugary drink machines in school halls is an abomination: I can't understand why head teachers and parents allow it.
    Perhaps it's in the Americanisation of the Irish schooling model? A sort of: aren't we so modern and cool that we have dispensing machines in the corridors?

    Again, no sugary foods or drinks are allowed in any Finnish national or international school. The state laws prevent kids from bringing sweets into the school environment at all, and minor punishments are given for most transgressions. A bit of physical exercise, or some additional homework - but no violent or physical chastisement is allowed either.

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    I think exercise is the big reason for obesity. Children used to walk or cycle to school now almost all go by car and bus, and insurers prevent children from running in playgrounds. Playing out in the streets has been ended by the dominance of the car. Physical fitness for the better off involves rugger schools, and endless chauffering by parents to out of school activities.
    Agreed. One rarely sees Irish kids cycling to school any more. Neither does one see five-a-sides and other games being played in the parks. Between the fear factors of the insurance companies, kiddie-fiddlers, and the prevalence of the 'I'll sue you' brigade, kids are hardly to be seen in public in the evenings anymore.

  13. #28
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by Mowl View Post
    In my day the daily post-school snacks were generally distributed by the parents when you got home, not bought by the kids themselves. The weekend pocket-money gave you that opportunity to buy for yourself. The rest of the week, the treats had to be merited by chores.



    Perhaps it's in the Americanisation of the Irish schooling model? A sort of: aren't we so modern and cool that we have dispensing machines in the corridors?

    Again, no sugary foods or drinks are allowed in any Finnish national or international school. The state laws prevent kids from bringing sweets into the school environment at all, and minor punishments are given for most transgressions. A bit of physical exercise, or some additional homework - but no violent or physical chastisement is allowed either.



    Agreed. One rarely sees Irish kids cycling to school any more. Neither does one see five-a-sides and other games being played in the parks. Between the fear factors of the insurance companies, kiddie-fiddlers, and the prevalence of the 'I'll sue you' brigade, kids are hardly to be seen in public in the evenings anymore.
    Cars drove kids off the streets (literally), and then television kicked in as a substitute for real life playing out.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  14. #29
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    Default Re: 10% of Population in Food Poverty in Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Cars drove kids off the streets (literally), and then television kicked in as a substitute for real life playing out.
    The fault can be put with parents squarely for letting their kids get into bad habits in the first place. As a big guy myself I dont enjoy exercise for the sake of it but I do love sports like badminton and football and sports which have an aim. Giving a few kids a football and getting them to play is not good enough, appeal a little to their competitive streak (not too much) and get them out there playing. Mowl makes a valid point on the whole wrapped in cotton wool parents do these days , its suffocating the kids.
    History is the only true teacher, the revolution the best school for the proletariat - Rosa Luxembourg

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