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Thread: Thousands march as protests spread across Brazil

  1. #16
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    Default Re: Thousands march as protests spread across Brazil

    Quote Originally Posted by Ephilant View Post
    Feeling right at home here, these people are brothers. Burning banks, riot police, pyrotechnics, anarchists, protests, corruption and bribery. Last night got wild, not in our area, but the centre of the city, around Praca da Se was most definitely a no-go area. Said one of the people in the internet cafe here that it is really strange that every time people come out on the streets for legitimate protests, the riot police get really violent, and pictures of "anarchist" appear everywhere, with those "anarchists" being blamed for the riots. Strangely enough, in the parallel society of poverty and illiteracy were people HAVE to rely on knowing and trusting each other rather than buying each other like in the "real world", they know each other better than they know their shadow. And nobody knows who these "anarchists" are, or what their agenda is. Just like home... They also warned me to stay away from the riots, this is only the start of it they say. Between high inflation, low wages, American snooping, bad government and the cost of the world cup, they have had enough.
    Euronews this morning was showing footage of this and reporting that "tear gas was thrown at riot police."

    Yes, these identikit anarchists are to be found worldwide, whereever there are riot police with equipment to test.

    Dual purpose training, and scaring people off the streets.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  2. #17
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    Default Re: Thousands march as protests spread across Brazil

    Black Block Brasil on facebook ...

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Black...53035154737576
    Do not rejoice in his defeat, you men. For though the world has stood up and stopped the bastard, the (female dog) that bore him is in heat again. Bertolt Brecht

  3. #18
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    Default Re: Thousands march as protests spread across Brazil

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Lord View Post
    Whatever their intentions, black blocs as a tactic on demonstrations act to provide cover for cops.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  4. #19
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    Default Re: Thousands march as protests spread across Brazil

    The Brazilian Supreme Court has upheld the sentences against some of the countries top politicians, bankers and businessmen. They are going to jail for corruption, with an average jail term of 5 years. One of the crimes they got convicted for is "betraying the trust of the people". Time to start taking a leaf out of the Brazilian book? Or is overcrowding of jails suddenly a very big problem in Europe...

  5. #20
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    Default Re: Thousands march as protests spread across Brazil

    March said to be over 1 million against Dilma Roussef and Petrobras corruption.

    http://tempsreel.nouvelobs.com/galer...-rousseff.html

    Where is this going ? What are the politics ?

    In Ukraine, anti-corruption protests led to more corruption.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  6. #21
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    Default Re: Thousands march as protests spread across Brazil

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    March said to be over 1 million against Dilma Roussef and Petrobras corruption.

    Where is this going ? What are the politics ?
    Glenn Greenwald on the background to the massive ongoing demonstrations:

    It is difficult to overstate the severity of Brazil's multi-level distress. This short paragraph yesterday from the New York Times's Brazil bureau chief, Simon Romero, conveys how dire it is:
    Brazil is suffering its worst economic crisis in decades. An enormousgraft scheme has hobbled the national oil company. The Zikaepidemic is causing despair across the northeast. And just before the world heads to Brazil for the Summer Olympics, the government is fighting for survival, with almost every corner of the political system under the cloud of scandal.
    Brazil's extraordinary political upheaval shares some similarities with the Trump-led political chaos in the U.S.: a sui generis, out-of-control circus unleashing instability and some rather dark forces, with a positive ending almost impossible to imagine. The once-remote prospect of President Dilma Rousseff's impeachment now seems likely.
    After three unsuccessful runs for the presidency, Lula proved to be an unstoppable political force. Elected in 2002 and re-elected in 2006, he left office with such high approval ratings that he was able to ensure the election of his previously unknown hand-picked successor, Dilma, who was then re-elected in 2014. It has long been assumed that Lula - who vocally opposes austerity measures - intends to run again for president in 2018 after completion of Dilma's second term, and anti-PT forces are petrified that he'd again beat them at the ballot box.
    There is no question that PT is rife with corruption. There are serious questions surrounding Lula that deserve an impartial and fair investigation. And impeachment is a legitimate process in a democracy provided that the targeted official is actually guilty of serious crimes and the law is scrupulously followed in how the impeachment is effectuated.

    But the picture currently emerging in Brazil surrounding impeachment and these street protests is far more complicated, and far more ethically ambiguous, than has frequently been depicted. The effort to remove Dilma and her party from power now resembles a nakedly anti-democratic power struggle more than a legally sound process or genuine anti-corruption movement. Worse, it's being incited, engineered, and fueled by the very factions who are themselves knee-deep in corruption scandals, and who represent the interests of the richest and most powerful societal segments long angry at their inability to defeat PT democratically.
    https://theintercept.com/2016/03/18/...-of-democracy/

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