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Thread: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

  1. #151
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by eamo View Post
    When I was over there I met people associated with their Rugby team who had been on counter-demonstrations when the far right had sought to gather. Seems that ethos goes through the whole club.



    Jayses lads, between the mushrooms and the joints we are in danger of been known as the stoners corner of PW



    Great post, great images.
    Funny how there always seems to be enough money for weapons.
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    Back on the job in Dublin today, I took a wrong turn when looking for a place in Newmarket and found this in Mill St.
    Sorry about the lamp post shadow, but it is one imaginative and happy way to transform a different coloured section of industrial wall.

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    Cute indeed as Ma Flower said.

    And put out those joints and mush the mushies or puritanical proletarian party (pooper) man, Sam, will be on your six quicker than you can spell bourgeois.

  2. #152
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    Some random shots from a recent trip to Tallinn, Estonia. Beautiful old town area, really has to be seen and experienced to believe as it defies all description. Very much a medieval atmosphere. Excellent architecture and attractions, a timeless feel about the place, and some of the finest haute cuisine ét vin in a while. Highly recommended for a weekend visit. Cheap as chips too.






  3. #153
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    Thumbs up Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    Nice photos Mowl, do you know what the Ultra Sankt Pauli one is about. I presume it is a football team, but using Che Guevara's image would indicate a leftist sentiment.
    The same famous image is used by San Pauli fans in Hamburg and Saint Patricks Athletic FC fans in Dublin. See images in this thread.

    The photo which was the inspiration for this image was taken in 1960 by Cuban photographer Alberto Díaz 'Korda' Gutierrez and the image was dramatised and popularised by the Irish artist Jim Fitzpatrick.

    Jim Fitzpatrick never claimed copyright but a row is still ongoing even after Alberto Díaz death in 2001.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mowl View Post

    Last summer I was showing some American U2 fans where the great Bono lives in Killiney when he is not hanging out with neo-con world leaders or preaching Capitalisim as the salvation of Africa or planning his next tax-efficient offshore move.




    I was taking pictures of them in front of the Bono's gate when a voice came over the intercom.
    As I moved nearer I heard the security man (well I presume it was not the Bono) say "move away from the gate".

    Maybe it was the American English / Hiberno English divide but the American Girl U2 fans thought he said "I will open the gates".
    Well this news kicked them from giddy into HYPER-giddy and their exuberance seemed to convince security not to engage with them any further.
    Needless to say the gate did not open for them, but this did not dampen their spirits, they were out to enjoy them selves and that was that!
    You got to admire American positivity sometimes.

    One curious thing I did notice was that fixed to the inside of the gates were what appears to be copper sheets.
    They are all engraved with sketches and writing which might be poetry or prose or gobbledygook, it is impossible to tell as the gate is in the way. Two titles I could make out were "Vision and Prayer" and "everything you know is wrong".

    Make you wonder why anyone who did not want folk hanging around their gate would put curious stuff which could only be half seen from up close behind their gate. Here is a sample of the Bono's gate.


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  4. #154
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    Bono's gate again;



    While over in Sallynoggin;
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    and on Leeson Lane, look at the small print
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  5. #155
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    That Tag Rugby crowd are not to be trusted.

  6. #156
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    Not entirely sure what that Ultra St Pauli thing is about, but having looked at a few of their pages pages on Google, it seems they're a radical left wing group who tie in their politics with their football.

    http://www.ultra-stpauli.com/

    I met a guy last night from Cuba, he was rather unstable mentally and confessed to being in the middle of a nervous breakdown, but we chatted about Che Guevara and his country for a while. I mentioned that I knew Jim Fitzpatrick personally and he asked me to thank him for his work on that now infamous image.

    Though he never made a penny from it himself, Jim recently gave the rights for the image to Guevara's daughter, something he had wanted to do for some time but never had the opportunity. He's a good man, our Jim, and I'm hopeful his health issues are remedied soon.

    His beautiful Celtic artwork will most certainly outlive him, and the revered Che image most of all.
    Last edited by Mowl; 21-10-2013 at 01:07 AM. Reason: ..still learning to tie own bootlaces in Finnish..

  7. #157
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mowl View Post
    Not entirely sure what that Ultra St Pauli thing is about, but having looked at a few of their pages pages on Google, it seems they're a radical right wing group who tie in their politics with their football.

    http://www.ultra-stpauli.com/

    I met a guy last night from Cuba, he was rather unstable mentally and confessed to being in the middle of a nervous breakdown, but we chatted about Che Guevara and his country for a while. I mentioned that I knew Jim Fitzpatrick personally and he asked me to thank him for his work on that now infamous image.

    Though he never made a penny from it himself, Jim recently gave the rights for the image to Guevara's daughter, something he had wanted to do for some time but never had the opportunity. He's a good man, our Jim, and I'm hopeful his health issues are remedied soon.

    His beautiful Celtic artwork will most certainly outlive him, and the revered Che image most of all.
    Did Sam not say they were known for their militant leftist view and anti racism etc

    And wiki says what Sam says

  8. #158
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    Meant left - apologies..typo repaired.

  9. #159
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mowl View Post
    Meant left - apologies..typo repaired.
    I thought it might be a different San Pauli club. The German club seem to be an extraordinary organisation. Players and supporters from all the sports played under the San Pauli umbrella have been on many demonstrations including counter demonstrations when the far right try to mobilise.



    This is a view of Loughlinstown Hospital from the rear. That is where you will find one of the almost forgotten Cemeteries which are the resting place of un-named and un-numbered victims of the famine as well as the many souls who died in the poor-house which was in the building now occupied by the hospital.



    The paupers cemetery is not signposted but is easily accessed by driving into the carpark at the rear of the hospital and looking out for a grassy path winding away into blackberry bushes and trees.



    Follow that way and after a short walk it opens onto a beautiful glade, you will almost certainly be the only living soul there but the place is so peaceful that it feels comfortable safe and warm.


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    The cemetery is well cared for but is thankfully not manicured until soulless. It is a sheltered open empty grassy space.
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    Last edited by C. Flower; 29-10-2013 at 11:34 PM.

  10. #160
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.


  11. #161
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kev Bar View Post
    Did Sam not say they were known for their militant leftist view and anti racism etc

    And wiki says what Sam says
    Quote Originally Posted by Mowl View Post
    Meant left - apologies..typo repaired.
    Well speak of the devil!! Just back from collecting a family member who finished the marathon, and yes I am proud of her, and what did I spot on Fitzwilliam st. Lr. but this.
    St. Pauli fans sure do get around.




    Near the Martello tower at Seapoint in Dublin, carved on an out of the way rock is this cross and the date 1833.
    No doubt carved there in memory of some sad tragedy.


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    Dún Laoghaire this morning:


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    and just because I think it is a nice photo.

    Bullock harbour yesterday:


  12. #162
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    Lovely photos of Loughlinstown, Eamo. It looks a peaceful spot.

    On a similiar topic: recently, the organisation behind the community association for Ballyfermot neighbourhood have started asking questions as to who it was in Dublin County Council who gave the go-ahead for the unceremonious removal of numerous hundreds of year-old graves at the site of the former Ballyfermot Castle and cemetery, on Le Fanu Road out in Ballyfermot west, now long gone.

    It's said locally that the castle, which dated back to the seventeenth century, and it's cemetery close by were deliberately allowed to fall into ruin, and it was also said by those apparently in the know that the construction of a more modern building would serve the commercial interests of the area far better. A pub stands on the spot where once stood a beautiful stone castle, the old heart of the neighbourhood.

    So they destroyed the castle and gave us a pub.

    I recall as a child many stories of grave-robbers and other scavengers associated with the site at the cemetery, but I also remember playing on the enormous burial mound when the gravestones were still standing. All were in a severely delapidated condition, and some had caved in completely. We'd often wonder as little kids if we dug a bit would we find bones and skulls? Maybe even buried treasure?

    It was a beautiful spot, many headstones read dates back to the early eighteenth and late seventeenth century, but as time went on it became a fly-tipping spot, and everybody dumped their household cráp there. Old prams, mattresses, cookers, and what have you. A short few years later, the entire area was bulldozed. No removal of remains, no ceremony, no remembrance stone. Just an industrial excavation of the whole site. Nobody now knows where the wasted remains were taken after bulldozing, or what happened to them, but it was all replaced with the estate now present as Cloverhill. A rough enough place for any child who was reared there throughout the seventies and eighties. A miserable sprawl of concrete/metal houses that looked like they might blow over in a strong gale. No amenities, no central area to orientate the locals and give a neighbourhood feeling. Most if not all of those original houses were replaced since, because they were built to such appalling standards, and the people were herded in like sheep before the project was even completed. Not many years later they'd all be marched back out again when the entire project was demolished to build the sturdier houses which stand there now.

    I also remember playing on the building site of Cloverhill. It was an adventure playground for us, traipsing through the brick skeletons of the houses as they were being constructed, but the skeletons and dust of the former occupants didn't seem to have any meaning for either the local church or the county council. Any sign of the cemetery was erased from existence.

    In a way, the photo (pics 5/6 in your previous post) of the mass grave above at Loughlinstown gives me a similiar chill of disgust at our inelegance, savagery, and in particular, the church's hypocritical lack of respect for it's precious flock. That so many bodies from the famine are remembered by just one stone out in the cemetery in Loughlinstown, and that the only name on the stone is the Sister who apparently dedicated it, reminds me of the same self-inflatable and triple-faced church which did so little to protect the remains of those buried next to Ballyfermot Castle. In fact, there is no marker there at all to indicate that they were ever buried there. Only a social welfare office.

    So they took away the graveyard and gave us a dole office.

    Where once was a castle, a place of much local history and pride, there's a pub. Where once was a cemetery, of similiar historical value and pride, is now a labour exchange.

    There's still a long way to go in having the pertinent questions about the cemetery at Ballyfermot answered by either the church or the county council, and as usual one suspects no-one will be held accountable. One suspects that somebody somewhere made a suitcase full of used cash from it, and that whatever chances there are of having any kind of inquiry these days would instead be arranged in such a way as to line the pockets of another generation of the same legal elite, rather than show some goddamned respect to the people of the area and their historical legacy.

    The site of the cemetery as it stands now:



    An older map of the area as it was before Cloverhill was constructed:

    Last edited by C. Flower; 29-10-2013 at 11:28 PM.

  13. #163
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    Great post Mowl, there was a time when we seemed to despise our past and every ancient and not so ancient manifestation of it. Wood Quay and the ESB offices are the best known examples but even more recently permission was given to demolish a 200 year old granite built church in Sandymount, Dublin. But overall I do think we are now better at looking after our heritage, well I suppose we could not have got any worse!


    These photos were kindly sent to me. They are of a small rock marked with a cross which is at the road end of a laneway near Ballycommon in North Tipperary.



    It marks the place where two Irish Volunteers were killed during the war of independence.



    There is an official monument at Knigh cross not far away but this small cross in stone, kept fresh and clear by locals is the real monument to my mind.

    I have several times walked the length of the ancient lainway. I wont walk it again. It has been shortened by gates and is now less than half its original length. Another piece of our history gone for ever.

  14. #164
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    On the Merrion road which runs parallel to the shore of Dublin Bay, between the Tara Towers hotel and the Texaco garage there is a laneway called Bellevue Ave.



    A short distance up the lane, behind the garage and through this gate is another of Dublins hidden graveyards.



    The small graveyard contains maybe a hundred graves, all the legible headstones date from the mid 1700's to the mid 1800's but there are some far older stones which time has worn down to mere stumps.



    Among the tombstones is this one which was placed there as it says "by order of General the Earl of Haprington commander of the forces in Ireland" to remember the 120 soldiers, mostly, as it says on the headstone, from South Mayo.
    They were shipwrecked and all perished off the south Dublin bay coast on the night of 19th November 1805.

    The shipwrecking of their ship, the "Prince of Wales" and also the "Rochdale" on the same night and also off the south Dublin coast led directly to the building of the great Dún Laoghaire harbour.
    Such was the shock of nearly 400 bodies of women children and men been washed up along the Dublin coast that the captain of the Prince of Wales, who survived in the only Lifeboat launched, was charged, but acquitted, of murder. At the trial the only two soldiers who survived gave their evidence through an interpreter, they only spoke Irish.






    Some links if you want to know more:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinking...rince_of_Wales

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merrion_Cemetery,_Bellevue

  15. #165
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    Default Re: The things people stick on lampposts thread.

    A relatively new and welcome development in Deans Grange cemetery is the identification and marking of the graves of the civilian casualties of the 1916 rising. It started to teem rain so it will have to wait another day for pics of the other graves, but they all have the same markers, just like this one, and they all seem to have been buried in previously unmarked graves.


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