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Thread: Recommended reads

  1. #31
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    Default Re: Recommended reads

    I have a couple of books which have choice selections of Tone's writings (Freedom The Wolfe Tone Way is very good) and I'm looking to get my hands on the entirety of his writings (his memoirs/diary certainly), any recommendations?

    There is a three volume edition out there which seems very comprehensive, but it has some major problems, firstly it is very expensive, secondly T.W Moody was involved with it and finally it has everything running chronologically which means that his diaries and memoirs are interrupted and intersected with pamphlets, letters etc which surely has to cripple the readability? Has anyone read it?

    Wolfe Tone's son published a collection of his fathers memoirs and writings, I think it has been updated over the years, would this be a better option?

    Or is there another collection out there I should be looking at?
    The United Irishman. Updated 5/2/14

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saoirse go Deo View Post
    I have a couple of books which have choice selections of Tone's writings (Freedom The Wolfe Tone Way is very good) and I'm looking to get my hands on the entirety of his writings (his memoirs/diary certainly), any recommendations?

    There is a three volume edition out there which seems very comprehensive, but it has some major problems, firstly it is very expensive, secondly T.W Moody was involved with it and finally it has everything running chronologically which means that his diaries and memoirs are interrupted and intersected with pamphlets, letters etc which surely has to cripple the readability? Has anyone read it?

    Wolfe Tone's son published a collection of his fathers memoirs and writings, I think it has been updated over the years, would this be a better option?

    Or is there another collection out there I should be looking at?
    I'm not sure what your problem with Moody being involved is. If it weren't for him, the thing never would have been done. So a debt of gratitude owed to the historians behind it.

    Tom Bartlett did an edition for the bicentenary that can be got from Lilliput Press. It's good, and cheap. About 20 quid.

    The son's edition is available on google books for nothing by the way.

  3. #33
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    Default Re: Recommended reads

    Quote Originally Posted by Garibaldy View Post
    I'm not sure what your problem with Moody being involved is. If it weren't for him, the thing never would have been done. So a debt of gratitude owed to the historians behind it.

    Tom Bartlett did an edition for the bicentenary that can be got from Lilliput Press. It's good, and cheap. About 20 quid.

    The son's edition is available on google books for nothing by the way.
    King of the revisionists wasn't he?

    Tom Bartlett's one sounds ideal, I think it is an updated edition of the one Wolfe Tone's son published. Thank you.

    http://www.lilliputpress.ie/book/66/...olfe_tone.html
    The United Irishman. Updated 5/2/14

  4. #34
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    Default Re: Recommended reads

    Quote Originally Posted by Saoirse go Deo View Post
    King of the revisionists wasn't he?

    Tom Bartlett's one sounds ideal, I think it is an updated edition of the one Wolfe Tone's son published. Thank you.

    http://www.lilliputpress.ie/book/66/...olfe_tone.html
    He wasn't really king of the revisionists, no, at least not in the political sense. What he did do with others was seek to try and bring the historical profession in Ireland into line with practices elsewhere. He was much more sympathetic to people like Tone and Davitt than some of those who followed.

    The Bartlett is indeed an edition of the son's edition.

    And no problem.

  5. #35
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    Default Re: Recommended reads

    The Missing Postman
    Postman Larry Griffin vanishes during his rounds in Stradbally on Christmas Day 1929. The only clue to what happened was an abandoned bicycle on a deserted country road.

    The story of the Missing Postman as it became known, made the headlines nationally and overseas, when ten prominent local people were arrested and charged with his murder. The defendants included such pillars of the community as two local Civic Guards, the school teacher, the local publican, his wife and two of their children.

    For eighty years the doors of Stradbally and the Garda files on the case remained firmly shut against anyone trying to investigate the story. Numerous successful libel actions taken by the former defendants further discouraged media interest. However all those involved have passed on. Government files, which cast new light on the case, have recently become available, and in this extraordinary new book, Ó Drisceoil weaves the pieces of the puzzle togther, and reveals the shocking answer to the question - what really happened to Larry Griffin?

    CSÍ - Missing Postman Larry Griffin is on RTE1 at 7.30 this eveningClick image for larger version. 

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  6. #36
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    A very detailed and well researched book, sometimes challenging the simple narrative that Britain felled all the woods. Though that's not to say they didn't didn't do huge damage. Much damage was also done by landed individuals for personal gain. There was also the mentality that the "barbarous Irish" seemed to use a system of what would now be labeled agro-forestry....with cattle allowed to roam in woodland. This was seen as proof of laziness by the aristocratic settlers who were obsessed with land "improvement", meaning forest and scrub clearance and constant manuring. A mentality that has carried down to today unfortunately, where in rural areas anything not a monoculture of perrenial ryegrass is deemed as "dirt" and areas of "wildness" a signal of a lazy farmer. It seems that pre-Tudor conquest, and so pre-mass enclosure, the rural landscape was a mosiac of woodland and agricultural land.
    The Irish in many areas were labelled woodkerne and viewed with contempt due to their willingness to live in wooded strongholds and to use them to mount assaults on the Crown.

    The book mentions some areas like the O'Neill stronghold in Tyrone and the Moores fastness in Laois-Offaly where magnificient areas of woodland were cleared for defensive military purposes by the English.

    Out of 15% woodland cover today in Ireland, only a paltry 1% is considered native woodland.

    In these days of steel, concrete and plastic we have forgotten what a fundamental raw mat-erial timber once was. It was crucial to shipbuilding until the first iron-hulled vessels of the 1800s; buildings, even when of stone or brick, needed timber for their roof crucks and beams; charcoal fuelled early industry; wooden barrel staves were essential for the shipment of a range of commodities; bark was requisite for the widespread tanning industry. The great woods that once stretched over Ireland were indispensable resources, sometimes squandered for political or economic reasons, sometimes carefully husbanded.

    As Nigel Everett recounts in The woods of Ireland: a history, 700–1800, Irish timber, particularly oak, was once greatly prized. It was used for the roof of Salisbury Cathedral in the thirteenth century, as well as for Canterbury and Exeter cathedrals, and it was exported to the Continent. Irish timber was important for shipbuilding, and items such as ‘oars, oar-blades, hoop staves, poles, laths, beams, small beams, ingle boards and ship planks’ were shipped from south-eastern ports to the English market. The extensive woods of Shillelagh, Co. Wicklow, were exploited over the centuries; in the seventeenth century beams from Shillelagh were used in the re-roofing of Dublin’s St Patrick’s Cathedral.

    The main theme of Everett’s scholarly and comprehensive work is a much larger one, however, than the straightforward story of the management and exploitation of Irish woods before 1800. He challenges the persistent belief that Ireland’s woods owed their decline to deliberate destruction by the English, the view that Ireland ‘was covered in trees until the English came and cut them down’. Everett’s purpose is to show that the real story is far more complex: ‘The history of Irish woods is replete with uncertainties, misapprehensions and elements of paradox’, and he poses the question ‘… when was the country denuded of its forests and who was chiefly responsible?’

    In early Ireland trees were venerated, but were regarded as expendable when military considerations were paramount; ‘warriors hack passages through dense forests, drive their chariots over mighty oaks, or uproot … trees to serve as cudgels’. The ancient Irish law-texts outlined general standards for woodland maintenance, however, and apparently already included regulations to protect hazel coppices—coppiced wood, particularly hazel branches, has always been a significant raw material.

    Felling of woodland intensified after the arrival of the Anglo-Normans in order to facilitate agriculture and settlement, and the settlers also needed trees cleared for security reasons; they went in constant fear, not unjustified, of Irish outlaws and rebels sheltering in the wastelands of forest, bog and mountain. In the first years of settlement, Henry II attacked Ireland’s forests and bogs ‘as barriers to conquest and repositories of rebellion’. Of the sixteenth century Everett writes that ‘Historians of Irish woods have been much taken with the idea of an arboreal “holocaust” ordered by a spiteful Queen Elizabeth’. He suggests, however, that orders for tree demolition may have been honoured more in the breach than in the observance.

    It is the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries that take up the greater part of this book, though, with chapters that include ‘The king’s woods, 1603–40’, ‘The propagation of timber, 1660–1700’, and ‘Reclaiming Ireland, 1700–60’. Everett concludes that ‘It might even be argued that, far from carelessly wrecking a great arboreal patrimony, the English conquest and the rising ascendancy introduced conservative standards of forest management until then neglected’.

    A section of colour plates complements the text. The English soldier Captain Thomas Lee is delightfully posed in 1594 as a ‘very superior style of woodkerne’ before an oak tree and a prospect of distant woods, wearing an elaborate shirt and doublet but bare-legged and barefooted. A map of 1598 shows woodland on an estate in County Cork, but with most of the land in cultivation. There are images from the eighteenth century, the great period of demesne paintings, also discussed in the short final chapter, ‘Demesne portraits’. The trees surrounding Powerscourt waterfall appear in an engraving by Giles King, although this is a modest delineation compared with the stately trees shown in paintings of the waterfall by George Barret, which Everett considers too romanticised. The richly planted demesne of Dawson Grove, Co. Monaghan, is displayed idyllically in views by Thomas Roberts, and a painting by Paul Sandby shows the thickly wooded character of the River Blackwater’s banks at Dromana.

    Nigel Everett has cast a wide net, drawing his material from very diverse fields, from the early annals to eighteenth-century tours and modern historiography. The bibliography is extensive. And the story has resonances in the modern world. Deforestation continues worldwide for the same reasons as once operated in Ireland, from the military tactics that caused the use of Agent Orange during the Vietnam War to the drive for commercial gain respon-sible for the devastation of tropical rainforests.

    Here in Ireland we are, perhaps, in a state of equilibrium, where commercial interests are balanced by aesthetic and recreational ones. The furore in the late twentieth century over the proposed sale of the remaining Shillelagh woods demonstrates the power of modern public opinion. The establishment of a Native Woodlands Scheme in 2011 and the work of the Tree Council of Ireland over recent decades show our positive engagement today with Ireland’s arboreal heritage. Nigel Everett’s definitive study provides fuel for the understanding of this heritage.
    http://www.historyireland.com/featur...tory-700-1800/

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fraxinus View Post
    A very detailed and well researched book, sometimes challenging the simple narrative that Britain felled all the woods. Though that's not to say they didn't didn't do huge damage. Much damage was also done by landed individuals for personal gain. There was also the mentality that the "barbarous Irish" seemed to use a system of what would now be labeled agro-forestry....with cattle allowed to roam in woodland. This was seen as proof of laziness by the aristocratic settlers who were obsessed with land "improvement", meaning forest and scrub clearance and constant manuring. A mentality that has carried down to today unfortunately, where in rural areas anything not a monoculture of perrenial ryegrass is deemed as "dirt" and areas of "wildness" a signal of a lazy farmer. It seems that pre-Tudor conquest, and so pre-mass enclosure, the rural landscape was a mosiac of woodland and agricultural land.
    The Irish in many areas were labelled woodkerne and viewed with contempt due to their willingness to live in wooded strongholds and to use them to mount assaults on the Crown.

    The book mentions some areas like the O'Neill stronghold in Tyrone and the Moores fastness in Laois-Offaly where magnificient areas of woodland were cleared for defensive military purposes by the English.

    Out of 15% woodland cover today in Ireland, only a paltry 1% is considered native woodland.


    http://www.historyireland.com/featur...tory-700-1800/
    THE WOODS OF IRELAND: A HISTORY, 700–1800

    I hope Santa brings me this one.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  8. #38
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Fascinating book. Did you know Bram Stoker married Oscar Wilde's former girlfriend? :-)

    I read 'Dracula' 1956 aged 14. Would not get out of bed to turn the light off.
    We are all insane animals existing for a time on an obviously unfinished planet.
    www.irelandtoo.com

  9. #39
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    Verso books publish some very interesting titles and they have 90% off ebook sale until close of business tomorrow.

    http://www.versobooks.com/blogs/2965...=endofyear2016
    The United Irishman. Updated 5/2/14

  10. #40
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    Any recommendations on books on Pre-history, whether on Ireland or wider ? I'm digging in to a few at the moment.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Any recommendations on books on Pre-history, whether on Ireland or wider ? I'm digging in to a few at the moment.
    Pre history...a new history of Ireland volume I edited by Daibhi O'Cronin is good. Atlas of the rural Irish landscape gives a good summary of landscape formation.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fraxinus View Post
    Pre history...a new history of Ireland volume I edited by Daibhi O'Cronin is good. Atlas of the rural Irish landscape gives a good summary of landscape formation.
    Ha! and where is the title/full reference of that book?

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by random new yorker View Post
    Ha! and where is the title/full reference of that book?
    This?

    http://www.corkuniversitypress.com/m...=9781859184592

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fraxinus View Post
    Thanks Fraxinus !

    Hey Maurice...this is also a good resource for practicing your painting skills in the icy/windy/cold days of winter

  15. #45
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    Fire and Fury. Inside the Trump White House.
    By Michael Wolff.

    First published in the United States in 2018 by Henry Holt and Company
    First published in Great Britain in 2018 by Little, Brown
    Copyright © 2018 by Michael Wolff
    The moral right of the author has been asserted.

    ---------------

    AUTHORS NOTE

    The reason to write this book could not be more obvious. With the inauguration
    of Donald Trump on January 20, 2017, the United States entered the eye of the
    most extraordinary political storm since at least Watergate. As the day
    approached, I set out to tell this story in as contemporaneous a fashion as
    possible, and to try to see life in the Trump White House through the eyes of the
    people closest to it.

    This was originally conceived as an account of the Trump administration’s
    first hundred days, that most traditional marker of a presidency. But events
    barreled on without natural pause for more than two hundred days, the curtain
    coming down on the first act of Trump’s presidency only with the appointment
    of retired general John Kelly as the chief of staff in late July and the exit of chief
    strategist Stephen K. Bannon three weeks later.

    The events I’ve described in these pages are based on conversations that took
    place over a period of eighteen months with the president, with most members of
    his senior staff—some of whom talked to me dozens of times—and with many
    people who they in turn spoke to. The first interview occurred well before I
    could have imagined a Trump White House, much less a book about it, in late
    May 2016 at Trump’s home in Beverly Hills—the then candidate polishing off a
    pint of Häagen-Dazs vanilla as he happily and idly opined about a range of
    topics while his aides, Hope Hicks, Corey Lewandowski, and Jared Kushner,
    went in and out of the room. Conversations with members of the campaign’s
    team continued through the Republican Convention in Cleveland, when it was
    still hardly possible to conceive of Trump’s election. They moved on to Trump
    Tower with a voluble Steve Bannon—before the election, when he still seemed
    like an entertaining oddity, and later, after the election, when he seemed like a
    miracle worker.

    Shortly after January 20, I took up something like a semipermanent seat on a
    couch in the West Wing. Since then I have conducted more than two hundred
    interviews.


    While the Trump administration has made hostility to the press a virtual
    policy, it has also been more open to the media than any White House in recent
    memory. In the beginning, I sought a level of formal access to this White House,
    something of a fly-on-the-wall status. The president himself encouraged this
    idea. But, given the many fiefdoms in the Trump White House that came into
    open conflict from the first days of the administration, there seemed no one
    person able to make this happen. Equally, there was no one to say “Go away.”
    Hence I became more a constant interloper than an invited guest—something
    quite close to an actual fly on the wall—having accepted no rules nor having
    made any promises about what I might or might not write.

    Many of the accounts of what has happened in the Trump White House are in
    conflict with one another; many, in Trumpian fashion, are baldly untrue. Those
    conflicts, and that looseness with the truth, if not with reality itself, are an
    elemental thread of the book. Sometimes I have let the players offer their
    versions, in turn allowing the reader to judge them. In other instances I have,
    through a consistency in accounts and through sources I have come to trust,
    settled on a version of events I believe to be true.

    Some of my sources spoke to me on so-called deep background, a convention
    of contemporary political books that allows for a disembodied description of
    events provided by an unnamed witness to them. I have also relied on off-therecord
    interviews, allowing a source to provide a direct quote with the
    understanding that it was not for attribution. Other sources spoke to me with the
    understanding that the material in the interviews would not become public until
    the book came out. Finally, some sources spoke forthrightly on the record.
    At the same time, it is worth noting some of the journalistic conundrums that
    I faced when dealing with the Trump administration, many of them the result of
    the White House’s absence of official procedures and the lack of experience of
    its principals. These challenges have included dealing with off-the-record or
    deep-background material that was later casually put on the record; sources who
    provided accounts in confidence and subsequently shared them widely, as
    though liberated by their first utterances; a frequent inattention to setting any
    parameters on the use of a conversation; a source’s views being so well known
    and widely shared that it would be risible not to credit them; and the almost
    samizdat sharing, or gobsmacked retelling, of otherwise private and deepbackground
    conversations. And everywhere in this story is the president’s own
    constant, tireless, and uncontrolled voice, public and private, shared by others on
    a daily basis, sometimes virtually as he utters it.

    For whatever reason, almost everyone I contacted—senior members of the
    White House staff as well as dedicated observers of it—shared large amounts of
    time with me and went to great effort to help shed light on the unique nature of
    life inside the Trump White House. In the end, what I witnessed, and what this
    book is about, is a group of people who have struggled, each in their own way,
    to come to terms with the meaning of working for Donald Trump.
    I owe them an enormous debt.

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