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Thread: Cyber Warfare Now Official

  1. #46
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    Quote Originally Posted by TotalMayhem View Post
    I think, it was a ship's anchor, or so the story went.
    Several.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  2. #47
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    A former senior Military Intelligence officer has questioned Ireland's readiness to deal with the fallout of the current tensions between European countries and Russia and the commitment at political level to strengthening the State's defences against hostile espionage activity.

    His remarks come as the Government has said Ireland will carry out a security assessment of Russian diplomats in Ireland with a view to possible further measures in the wake of the poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in the UK on 4 March.

    Former deputy director of Military Intelligence Michael Murphy raised concerns about Ireland's ability to carry out such an independent assessment.

    Speaking on RTÉ's This Week, the retired Lieutenant Colonel said: "That decision must be made on good information and good intelligence and you have to ask 'how good is our intelligence'?

    "We do not have a civilian intelligence agency. We have Military Intelligence and we have Garda Intelligence.

    "I'm hearing a lot that our European partners will be helping us as well in making that assessment. One has to understand that there is no such thing as a friendly foreign intelligence service - all intelligence services have a purpose and some foreign intelligence services have the purpose of the economic well being of their own country.

    "So you cannot depend on foreign intelligence agencies to help your decision."
    More here:

    https://www.rte.ie/news/ireland/2018...ty-assessment/
    "If you go far enough to either extreme of the political spectrum, Communist or fascist, you'll find hard-eyed men with guns who believe that anybody who doesn't think as they do should be incarcerated or exterminated. " - Jim Garrison, Former DA, New Orleans.

  3. #48
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    The Skripals seem to have disappeared in the UK 60 days ago: their own family members and even their dog don't know where they are. Questions being asked online but not in the main stream media.

    http://thesaker.is/the-skripals-will...lowed-to-talk/
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  4. #49
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    The Skripals seem to have disappeared in the UK 60 days ago: their own family members and even their dog don't know where they are. Questions being asked online but not in the main stream media.

    http://thesaker.is/the-skripals-will...lowed-to-talk/
    If I were in their position I'd be anxious to disappear in a hurry too, rather than wait around in the hope that there wouldn't be a 2nd attempt.
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

  5. #50
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    Quote Originally Posted by Count Bobulescu View Post
    If I were in their position I'd be anxious to disappear in a hurry too, rather than wait around in the hope that there wouldn't be a 2nd attempt.
    Well, that would be the first assumption, but would you not let your family know you were alive ? Whether or not abducted and if so by whom, the whole story really smelled like a big fat furry rat.
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  6. #51
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    Quote Originally Posted by C. Flower View Post
    Well, that would be the first assumption, but would you not let your family know you were alive ? Whether or not abducted and if so by whom, the whole story really smelled like a big fat furry rat.
    Family may know they're alive, but not they're location, and/or have been asked to say they know neither. That would be the smart thing.
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

  7. #52
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    Quote Originally Posted by Count Bobulescu View Post
    Family may know they're alive, but not they're location, and/or have been asked to say they know neither. That would be the smart thing.
    It would.
    Do you believe in the nerve gas story ? All of these weird deaths in the UK. Government scientists, M15 men found in bags - can't all be Putin, surely ?
    “ We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and mute as stones, our very passivity would be an act. ”
    — Jean-Paul Sartre

  8. #53
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    Stunning read: Worthy of your time
    Courtesy WIRED
    WIRED's September cover story ... "NotPetya, the most devastating cyberattack in history," a Russian hit on Ukraine in June 2017 that went global — by senior writer Andy Greenberg (adapted from his forthcoming book, "Sandworm"):

    • "Crippled ports. Paralyzed corporations. Frozen government agencies. How a single piece of code crashed the world."
    • "For days, ... one of the world’s most complex and interconnected distributed machines, underpinning the circulatory system of the global economy itself, would remain broken."
    • "The result was more than $10 billion in total damages, according to a White House assessment."

    Why it matters: "This is the confounding geography of cyberwarfare: In ways that still defy human intuition, phantoms ... in a gritty corner of Kiev spread chaos into the gilded conference rooms of the capital’s federal agencies, into ports dotting the globe ... and across the global economy."

    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

  9. #54
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    The US said it would offer its cyber capabilities to NATO. The planned announcement comes amid growing worries about Russia’s hacking exploits. Britain has led a push to heighten computer defenses for the 29-nation alliance, which has recognized cyber as a domain of warfare since 2014.
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

  10. #55
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    China has been up to no good



    Nested on the servers’ motherboards, the testers found a tiny microchip, not much bigger than a grain of rice, that wasn’t part of the boards’ original design. Amazon reported the discovery to U.S. authorities, sending a shudder through the intelligence community. Elemental’s servers could be found in Department of Defense data centers, the CIA’s drone operations, and the onboard networks of Navy warships. And Elemental was just one of hundreds of Supermicro customers.
    During the ensuing top-secret probe, which remains open more than three years later, investigators determined that the chips allowed the attackers to create a stealth doorway into any network that included the altered machines. Multiple people familiar with the matter say investigators found that the chips had been inserted at factories run by manufacturing subcontractors in China.




    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/featu...premium-europe
    Politics is the gentle art of getting votes from the poor and campaign funds from the rich, by promising to protect each from the other. ~Oscar Ameringer

  11. #56
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    It's not just China & Russia, DPRK too.


    Foiling North Korea's bank-robbing hackers



    For several years, North Korea has been conducting a spree of bank robberies online. A new report from FireEye makes clear that a recent attempt to "name and shame" a North Korean government-affiliated hacker did nothing to curtail the digital heists, and sanctions have only made Pyongyang more eager to steal money. But experts think the U.S. still has other levers it can pull.


    Why it matters: While the Trump administration is trying to play nice with Kim Jong-un ("We fell in love," said Trump at a rally Saturday night), the continuing heist campaign has attempted to steal more than $1 billion total.
    Background: After years of crippling sanctions, the Kim regime began using part of its cyber program to generate the cash North Korea needed to run. According to FireEye, North Korea began robbing banks in 2014, shortly after being sanctioned for its third nuclear test.



    • Since then, the pile of international sanctions has only grown, including some for cyberattacks. Those sanctions appear to have encouraged more North Korean thefts.



    The FireEye report, released Wednesday, is an argument that North Korea's bank hackers are separate and distinct from the country's other hacking ventures.



    • The bank robbers, which FireEye calls "APT38," operate by hacking a victim and requesting large transfers over the SWIFT interbank messaging system. "The attack ends in destructive, disk-whipping malware. They want to destroy systems not only to delete evidence, but to give them time to launder funds," said Nalani Fraser, threat intelligence manager at FireEye.
    • APT38 is one of a number of financial crime operations in North Korea. Other hackers, for example, rob cryptocurrency exchanges.



    Name and shame: In September, the Trump administration publicly named, sanctioned and announced plans to charge North Korean Park Jin Hyok for, among other things, helping develop the WannaCry malware.



    • The tactic, often called "naming and shaming," did not decrease APT38 attacks.



    The diplomatic play: Trump could make financial attacks a deal breaker in nuclear negotiations with North Korea, suggested Andrew Grotto, former senior director for cybersecurity policy to Presidents Obama and Trump and a current fellow at Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation.



    • "The Trump administration pulled out of the Iran deal in part because it didn’t address other issues, like hacking," he said. "If they’re consistent, they would try to address bank robbery."



    The legal moves: Grotto notes financial crimes require an external, international network of collaborators — from money launderers to people who identify soft targets to attack. If we can't arrest hackers in North Korea, we could arrest confederates elsewhere.



    • Since North Korea lacks the internet infrastructure needed to launch cyberattacks, many of its attacks are launched from other countries. Michael Daniel, former White House cybersecurity coordinator and the current president and CEO of the Cyber Threat Alliance, believes the U.S. could press countries to cough up North Koreans.



    Returning fire: And, said Daniel, the United States could use cyber means to disrupt the networks.


    Or all of the above: "It would likely be a complex mix of tactics," said Daniel.


    US authorities charged 7 Russian GRU hackers
    US authorities charged seven Russian GRU agents for hacking a number of targets, including the World Anti-Doping Agency and other sports-related targets, and conducting an influence campaign based on those breaches.
    Why it matters: Fancy Bear, hackers believed to have breached the Democratic National Committee in 2016 to tamper in the 2016 elections, is also believed to be the group that hacked the WADA. Putting two and two together, if these guys hacked WADA, maybe, just maybe, they are also involved with the group behind the 2016 election hacking.
    The details: The international hacking campaign included attacks against laboratories in Switzerland and Brazil — document dumps under a website for “Fancy Bear's Hack Team.”
    The big picture: Earlier in the day, Dutch authorities announced arresting and expelling four Russian agents caught attacking the lab running tests on the poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and conducting attacks on British officials.

    • The sealed U.S. charges released today accuse "some of the same Russian operatives caught in The Hague, along with their colleagues in Moscow, as part of a conspiracy to hack a variety of individuals and organizations, in the United States, Canada, and Europe, to obtain information or access that was then exploited for the benefit of the Russian government," said U.S. Assistant Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers.

    The arrests might recontextualize a Wednesday night announcement by the UK's National Cyber Security Center that Russia was indeed behind a number of attacks most believed they were already behind, including the WADA and DNC.



    • The Department of Homeland Security warned there was a new flurry of activity from the "cloudhopper" group, which the private sector linked to China. Cloudhopper has been active since 2017 and targets cloud and managed services to steal secrets.

    New Fancy Bear activity in South America, Europe
    Fancy Bear is escalating espionage, particularly in Europe, according to a Symantec report released Thursday.
    The big picture: Historically, most Fancy Bear hacking is to steal information. That's likely the goal here according to the report, which notes a more covert approach than the 2016 election hacking.
    The targets identified by Symantec include several governments and military groups in Europe, one South American government, a "well-known" international organization and an Eastern European embassy.






    This presumably puts Russia and China on opposite sides of the US election, and the poor US voter thought it was all about the price of bananas.

    Pence accuses China of anti-Trump campaign
    Vice President Pence on Thursday accused China of meddling in U.S. elections with the aim of hurting President Trump and the Republican Party, the latest sign of the administration taking a tough line against Beijing ahead of the November midterms.

    In a fiery speech to the conservative Hudson Institute in Washington, Pence said that China is extending its power "in more proactive and coercive ways to interfere in the domestic policies and politics of the United States."

    "To put it bluntly, President Trump’s leadership is working; China wants a different American president," Pence said.
    Read the full story here

    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

  12. #57
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    Default Re: Cyber Warfare Now Official

    Will be interesting to see how this develops..............



    According to Bloomberg Businessweek, hackers believed to be working on behalf of the Chinese government managed to sneak a nearly invisible spy chip onto servers made by Supermicro and deliver them to Apple and Amazon.


    According to Apple, Amazon, Supermicro and the Chinese government, nothing of the sort took place.


    The bottom line: The allegations are explosive, but the denials from Apple and Amazon are both strong, specific, and highly unusual for both companies.
    What they're saying:



    • Apple: "As Apple has repeatedly explained to Bloomberg reporters and editors over the past 12 months, there is no truth to these claims." The company refuted the allegations in detail and denied that it was under any kind of legal restraint to talk about the matter.
    • Amazon: "There are so many inaccuracies in ‎this article as it relates to Amazon that they’re hard to count." It also went into detail on what it believes are several problems with the story.
    • Supermicro: "Supermicro has never been contacted by any government agencies either domestic or foreign regarding the alleged claims."
    • Britain's National Cyber Security Center (per Reuters): “We are aware of the media reports but at this stage have no reason to doubt the detailed assessments made by AWS and Apple."
    • Bloomberg issued a statement standing by its story and noting its investigation took a year and involved more than 100 interviews.

    Our thought bubble: It's worth noting that no other publication has said it has any of the same information as Bloomberg. Nor has anyone provided a plausible explanation for the striking disparity between the report and the denials.

    • The Washington Post initially had a story with an official expressing confidence in the report, but it was updated with an editor's note saying the official "later expressed uncertainty."

    The big picture: The Bloomberg report comes in the wake of security concerns about Chinese hardware, especially those manufactured by Huawei and ZTE.

    • The story posted on the same day that Vice President Mike Pence delivered a broadside against Chinese influence campaigns — but since Bloomberg's story has long been in the works, the timing seems most likely a coincidence.

    Perhaps the best piece out there came from longtime security reporter Zack Whittaker, of TechCrunch, who writes about the murkiness and pitfalls of national security reporting.

    • Whittaker hearkens back to the days of the Edward Snowden revelations and notes how some of the initial reporting on the top secret Prism program also elicited strenuous denials, in part because some key details were misreported.
    • On Twitter, he concludes:

    I think this Bloomberg "chip spy" story boils down to one basic point. The real problem is that some of the smartest, brilliant minded, rational people who are experts in this field have no idea who to believe on this story. I'm an idiot — and I have no clue, either.
    As a general rule the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.

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