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Thread: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

  1. #16
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    Quote Originally Posted by Stasia View Post
    Connolly campaigned for German victory.
    Really?

    My recollection is of the slogan "Neither King nor Kaiser but Ireland."
    Do not rejoice in his defeat, you men. For though the world has stood up and stopped the bastard, the (female dog) that bore him is in heat again. Bertolt Brecht

  2. #17
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Lord View Post
    Really?

    My recollection is of the slogan "Neither King nor Kaiser but Ireland."
    Mine too. This is anti socialist nonsense.

  3. #18
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Lord View Post
    Really?

    My recollection is of the slogan "Neither King nor Kaiser but Ireland."
    or
    "I know it because I read it in the papers. I also know it to be the case because in every country I have graced with my presence up to the present time, or have heard from, the possessing classes through their organs in the press, and their spokesmen upon the platform have been vociferous and insistent in declaring the foreign origin of Socialism.

    In Ireland Socialism is an English importation, in England they are convinced it was made in Germany, in Germany it is a scheme of traitors in alliance with the French to disrupt the Empire, in France it is an accursed conspiracy to discredit the army. In Russia it is an English plot to prevent Russian extension towards Asia, in Asia it is known to have been set on foot by American enemies of Chinese and Japanese industrial progress, and in America it is one of the baneful fruits of unrestricted pauper and criminal immigration."

  4. #19
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    I don't understand why this book is being "launched" considering it was published in 2005 and that the library here has had it for some years.

  5. #20
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    And here is what he said -

    SPEECH BY LEADER OF THE LABOUR PARY EAMON GILMORE T.D., AT THE LAUNCH OF DONAL NEVIN’S NEW BOOKS – ‘POLITICAL WRITINGS OF JAMES CONNOLLY 1893- 1916’ AND THE ‘COLLECTED WORKS OF JAMES CONNOLLY’

    It is a real pleasure for me to be here this evening to launch these two volumes.

    I want, at the outset, to pay tribute to their editor Donal Nevin. Not just for the work we are launching this evening, but for his years of dedicated service to the Labour movement. It is a remarkable testament to the man, that having retired after 40 years of service to the Congress of Trade Unions, he has effectively taken on a second career, as a scholar of James Connolly.

    The books we are launching this evening are both an important contribution in themselves, but they are also companion works to Donal’s other works on Connolly. A Full Life - His biography of Connolly which was published in 2005, and Between Comrades, the collected letters of James Connolly, published by Donal in 2007.

    Now, Donal is launching these two volumes of Connolly’s collected works, at an important time, in the run up to the centenaries of the foundation of the Labour party and of the 1913 lock-out.

    It is important to pay tribute too, to SIPTU, for their support in publishing these volumes, which also had support from the Government’s Commemorations Initiatives Fund.

    It is absolutely essential that, in the decade of commemorations that will centre around the 100th anniversary of 1916, the full role and significance of the Labour movement in those turbulent years leading up to the foundation of the state is re-examined and properly acknowledged.

    All too often in the past, Labour was quite simply written out of the official script. The story of that decade from 1911 to 1921, was far richer, far more complicated and far more diverse than the simplistic version that was often handed down in the years that followed.

    The story of Irish freedom did not start in 1916. It was not just about what happened that Easter Monday morning. And Connolly’s life and contribution, in particular, cannot be reduced to the role that he played in the Easter Rising.

    Connolly was first and foremost a socialist and a trade unionist. His contribution was practical and theoretical. His pen as much a weapon as his capacity to organise a strike, of indeed, his military actions.

    In promoting greater understanding of the role that the Labour movement played in those turbulent years, we should also be conscious of others who have also been written out of the script. I agree with the comments made last week by former Taoiseach John Bruton, who called for a proper commemoration of all the political traditions that featured at the time. Including the Labour movement, the constitutional nationalist tradition, and the men of both nationalist and unionist Ireland who perished in the First World War.

    Just as Labour’s role in the struggle for Irish freedom was brushed under the carpet, so too was the sacrifice of many Irish volunteers, who on the advice of their leaders, went to fight for the freedom of small nations. In reading through these volumes, you will see the scorn that Connolly regularly poured out onto the head of John Redmond. All the more reason to reconsider his significance.

    These two volumes are an invaluable aid to those kind of debates. In the Collected works, Donal is providing us with ready access to Connolly’s theoretical and historical analysis. Connolly is correctly acknowledged as one of the most formidable political thinkers that Ireland has ever produced.

    In the second volume, then, the Collected Political Writings, Donal has brought together Connolly’s journalistic contributions.

    This second volume is a real treasure throve. Not just as a work of scholarship, but as a book that you can pick up from time to time and dip into. It brings together 223 editorials and articles written by Connolly, as well as seven manifestos and three election addresses. You can read through it and get a flavour of how his thinking developed over the years. But you can also enjoy the quality of the writing. Sometimes acerbic, but never boring. As you flick through it, you find a book that is littered with literary and political gems.

    On page 513, speaking of the Trade Union movement in America, he writes

    ‘The spirit, the character, the militant spirit, the fighting character of the organisation, was of the first importance. I believe that the development of the fighting spirit is of more importance than the creation of the theoretically perfect organisation; that, indeed, the most theoretically perfect organisation may, because of its very perfection and vastness, be of the greatest possible danger to the revolutionary movement if it tends, or is used, to repress and curb the fighting spirit of comradeship in the rank and file’.

    Clearly, he had been to his fair share of branch meetings!

    Finally, I would draw your attention to page 328, where Connolly writes that

    ‘’The socialist party of Ireland …. Recognises that national political freedom is an inevitable step towards the attainment of universal economic freedom’.

    He wrote that on the 18th of March 1911. One hundred years later, almost to the week, the Labour Party entered a national Government with the simply aim of re-gaining Ireland’s economic sovereignty, so that we can go on to build a better society, and a future for our children.

    One hundred years later, his work continues. Thanks to Donal Nevin, we have a chance to appreciate, and enjoy his writings again.

  6. #21
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    Comedy gold from Gilmore. Anyone know when he's doing his Irish tour?

  7. #22
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    Quote Originally Posted by Fraxinus View Post
    Comedy gold from Gilmore. Anyone know when he's doing his Irish tour?
    2015. It will be his farewell tour.

  8. #23
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Lord View Post
    Really?

    My recollection is of the slogan "Neither King nor Kaiser but Ireland."
    Quote Originally Posted by Apjp View Post
    Mine too. This is anti socialist nonsense.
    That's a famous slogan in a famous photograph. That's all it is, no more, no less. The Proclamation referred to "our gallant allies in Europe". Which side of the Great War does that put Connolly on? A position opposed to Britain's in strategic terms, and aligned with Germany's, gets categorised as anti-socialist. How strange, I wonder why.

    Whatever about the slogan in the photo, Connolly wrote plenty on this subject, in his own name, in his own newspaper, during the 1914-16 period. When I have more time I'll dig out more of his foreign policy writings and post them here. Even before that period Connolly's foreign policy alignment was well worked out:

    "We are told that the German working-man is 'groaning' under Protection and is exceedingly poor and ill-used, whilst the British working-man, enjoying the 'blessings of free trade', is highly paid, well nourished, flourishing and happy. The picture is a fancy picture. The German working-man, far from being poor and ill-used, is fully occupied, very well paid, and very well fed, and he is so exceedingly prosperous that I have no hesitation in saying that the averager German working-man is incomparably better off than is the average British working-man" (p. 545). [The cost of living was lower than in Britain, unemployment was lower and] "Whilst Great Britain cannot afford to insure her workmen against accident, disease and old age, Germany protects with her state insurance societies all her workers, male and female, 18,743,000 in number ... Compared with the irregularly occupied and poor British working-man he is a Croesus" (p. 549, quoted in Ellis Barker's anti-German Modern Germany: Her Political and Economic Problems, her Foreign and Domestic Policy, her Ambitions and the Causes of her Success, 1907 edition.)

    Social Protection versus Globalisation. De-bunking of Free Market propaganda. All strangely familiar, isn't it?

  9. #24
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    Quote Originally Posted by Baron von Biffo View Post
    2015. It will be his farewell tour.
    He'll be a sell out so Better get your tickets fast

  10. #25
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    1987 and 1988 the Communist party of Ireland published these two volumes with an introduction by the late Michael O'Riordan. Well worth getting, I presume they are still available from the C.P.I. Only reservation I have is the binding is not great. I have long term plans to get them re-bound when I win the lotto. ( Red WP sticker is not part of the book.)


  11. #26
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    I am pretty certain that James Connolly would be happy to actually kill Eamonn Gilmore if he were around today.
    "Fascinating, watching the world act as though it still had a financial system. Using the toilet, when the pipes are gone." - some guy on twitter

  12. #27
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    Quote Originally Posted by Stasia View Post
    That's a famous slogan in a famous photograph. That's all it is, no more, no less. The Proclamation referred to "our gallant allies in Europe". Which side of the Great War does that put Connolly on? A position opposed to Britain's in strategic terms, and aligned with Germany's, gets categorised as anti-socialist. How strange, I wonder why.

    Whatever about the slogan in the photo, Connolly wrote plenty on this subject, in his own name, in his own newspaper, during the 1914-16 period. When I have more time I'll dig out more of his foreign policy writings and post them here. Even before that period Connolly's foreign policy alignment was well worked out:

    "We are told that the German working-man is 'groaning' under Protection and is exceedingly poor and ill-used, whilst the British working-man, enjoying the 'blessings of free trade', is highly paid, well nourished, flourishing and happy. The picture is a fancy picture. The German working-man, far from being poor and ill-used, is fully occupied, very well paid, and very well fed, and he is so exceedingly prosperous that I have no hesitation in saying that the averager German working-man is incomparably better off than is the average British working-man" (p. 545). [The cost of living was lower than in Britain, unemployment was lower and] "Whilst Great Britain cannot afford to insure her workmen against accident, disease and old age, Germany protects with her state insurance societies all her workers, male and female, 18,743,000 in number ... Compared with the irregularly occupied and poor British working-man he is a Croesus" (p. 549, quoted in Ellis Barker's anti-German Modern Germany: Her Political and Economic Problems, her Foreign and Domestic Policy, her Ambitions and the Causes of her Success, 1907 edition.)

    Social Protection versus Globalisation. De-bunking of Free Market propaganda. All strangely familiar, isn't it?

    He may have thought the German workers better off but that does not mean he supported Germany in the war. It would be a pretty odd position for a socialist to take. It is my understanding that he viewed the war as an imperialist war ....

    Was he not a founder of the Neutrality League?
    Do not rejoice in his defeat, you men. For though the world has stood up and stopped the bastard, the (female dog) that bore him is in heat again. Bertolt Brecht

  13. #28
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    Quote Originally Posted by Stasia View Post
    That's a famous slogan in a famous photograph. That's all it is, no more, no less. The Proclamation referred to "our gallant allies in Europe". Which side of the Great War does that put Connolly on? A position opposed to Britain's in strategic terms, and aligned with Germany's, gets categorised as anti-socialist. How strange, I wonder why.

    Whatever about the slogan in the photo, Connolly wrote plenty on this subject, in his own name, in his own newspaper, during the 1914-16 period. When I have more time I'll dig out more of his foreign policy writings and post them here. Even before that period Connolly's foreign policy alignment was well worked out:

    "We are told that the German working-man is 'groaning' under Protection and is exceedingly poor and ill-used, whilst the British working-man, enjoying the 'blessings of free trade', is highly paid, well nourished, flourishing and happy. The picture is a fancy picture. The German working-man, far from being poor and ill-used, is fully occupied, very well paid, and very well fed, and he is so exceedingly prosperous that I have no hesitation in saying that the averager German working-man is incomparably better off than is the average British working-man" (p. 545). [The cost of living was lower than in Britain, unemployment was lower and] "Whilst Great Britain cannot afford to insure her workmen against accident, disease and old age, Germany protects with her state insurance societies all her workers, male and female, 18,743,000 in number ... Compared with the irregularly occupied and poor British working-man he is a Croesus" (p. 549, quoted in Ellis Barker's anti-German Modern Germany: Her Political and Economic Problems, her Foreign and Domestic Policy, her Ambitions and the Causes of her Success, 1907 edition.)

    Social Protection versus Globalisation. De-bunking of Free Market propaganda. All strangely familiar, isn't it?

    He may have thought the German workers better off but that does not mean he supported Germany in the war. It would be a pretty odd position for a socialist to take. It is my understanding that he viewed the war as an imperialist war ....

    Was he not a founder of the Neutrality League?

    Does our "gallant allies in Europe" really refer to Germany? I never read it that way.
    Do not rejoice in his defeat, you men. For though the world has stood up and stopped the bastard, the (female dog) that bore him is in heat again. Bertolt Brecht

  14. #29
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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Lord View Post
    Does our "gallant allies in Europe" really refer to Germany? I never read it that way.
    The "gallant allies" provided rifles for the Rising, and landed one of the Irish leaders on the Kerry coast by submarine when it looked like the Rising needed to be postponed if it was to have any chance of success. The same allies who were the excuse for the "German plot" conspiracy theory which was used as the excuse for the 1917-18 Irish conscription plan which, if implemented, would have empowered the British military government of Ireland to arrest a couple of hundred thousand Irishmen, force them overseas, and shoot them dead if they refused to kill Turks, Germans, Austrians, Hungarians, Czechs, ...
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Lord View Post
    He may have thought the German workers better off but that does not mean he supported Germany in the war. It would be a pretty odd position for a socialist to take. It is my understanding that he viewed the war as an imperialist war ....
    Was he not a founder of the Neutrality League?
    In advance of the Great War the European socialist movement was committed to preventing their followers from becoming cannon fodder. That didn't stop the war, didn't prevent the industrial consumption of cannon fodder, and didn't stop most of Europe's socialist leaders from becoming active recruiters of their own members for cannon fodder for their own governments. Once that happened, what was to be done by those socialists, like Connolly, who did NOT follow their national leaders (in Connolly's case, Redmond) into the cannon fodder crusade? Sit around, NOT try to stop the swallowing up of their people as cannon fodder? NOT try to salvage something from the disaster?

    Josef Pilsudski (Polish Socialist Party, and before that, Narodnaya Volya, a Russian revolutionary socialist organisation) organised a Polish army to fight for the Central Powers against the Allies, and after the war became leader of a Poland newly independent after nearly two centuries of rule by Austria/Prussia/Germany as well as Russia.

    Pilsudski fought on the side of the German "Empire" (a newly united federation of previously separate German states with many of which Britain was traditionally allied against France, but which, once united, came to be seen by Britain as a new and greater challenge to its domination of the world - that's how Roger Casement explained it); and on the side of the Austro-Hungarian "Empire" (many of whose "subject" peoples fought to defend it).

    Connolly was "odd" only in the sense that most other European socialist leaders actively endorsed the cannon fodder crusade. But he wasn't the only socialist to try to salvage something from the catastrophe. Like Pilsudski, Connolly was responsible for wresting victory from the jaws of defeat -stopping Redmond's voluntary cannon fodder crusade, providing the means of preventing conscription by force of cannon fodder, ultimate Irish independence.

    Not bad for a Rising that ostensibly failed. But, unlike Pilsudski, Connolly did not live to see his victory.

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    Default Re: Eamon Gilmore to Launch Book on James Connolly

    Quote Originally Posted by unspecific715 View Post
    I am pretty certain that James Connolly would be happy to actually kill Eamonn Gilmore if he were around today.
    +1

    (internet equivalent of 'hear hear'). Connolly knew the sort of forces he was up against and I doubt he'd have had a benevolent eye for the blatant liars of Ireland's Labour Party- or their gombeen landlooter wives.
    Think National. Act Local. Oh- and superstition is just the dark matter of human history.

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