PDA

View Full Version : The Militarisation of Emergency Aid to Haiti - Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion ?



C. Flower
25-03-2010, 09:57 PM
13th January 2010 news came through of a earthquake in Haiti. At the time some of us were on Tok, a temporary freeforum. I'm bringing this thread here so we can continue to follow what is happening in Haiti.





Poor Haiti - a major earthquake seven hours ago and hundreds killed in Port au Prince
http://www.nwprogressive.org/weblog/2010/01/massive-earthquake-strikes-haiti.html
They have not recovered yet from the two hurricanes are in desperate poverty.

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 09:58 PM
Its turned out to be a terrible earthquake in terms of destruction.
THey need a lot of help - they still have hundreds of thousands of people not properly housed after the hurricanes.
I recommend this Haitian blog, that describes from the inside what the succession of coups have meant in terms of Haitian resources being creamed off by outside Corporations.
http://www.prevalhaiti.com/messages.php/14570
I read that Obama has offered help - 72 men. Which compares rather poorly to the 100, 000 "helpers" in Afghanistan.
The earthquake Richter 7+ was close to the surface and brought down most of the main buildings of Port au Prince.

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:00 PM
Posted by Ah Well:



I spent a lot of time watching it last night and a bit today too ... truly awful occurrence.
While far from pleasant viewing, the Internet has played its part big time here. While standard communications seemed to be badly affected amazingly some people in Haiti had internet connections and were able to use social media such as Twitter and Skype to contact the outside world.
These links I found very useful, if sober, viewing.
http://live.cnn.com/ CNN Live - gives a good general overview. Had a lot of coverage up to this afternoon, they'll prob have more later
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?v=wall&gid=252988675717 Facebook Site with 38000+ signups. Heartrending stuff seeing so many enquiring as to loved ones here. Came across one today where a woman was looking for rescue assistance to search hotel rubble for her husband and 3 kids and she was able to hear her daughter crying. I emailed the US Embassy in Haiti with her message on Facebook in the faint hope it might get picked up or acted upon
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/pierrecote This made for riveting viewing last night & today. This guy Pierrecote is in Montreal and spent 14 hours online chatting on occasions to people in Haiti by using Skype enquiring about missing persons for people and getting info re general damage. Major Broadcasters such as CNN were onto him. People also acted as translators for him into English, French and Creole in the Chatroom. He might be online later tonight.

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:02 PM
Posted by 5intheFace



Posted: 13 Jan 2010 09:32 pm Post subject: http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/templates/subSilver/images/lang_english/icon_quote.gif (http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/posting.php?mode=quote&p=1200&mforum=tok) http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/templates/subSilver/images/lang_english/icon_edit.gif (http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/posting.php?mode=editpost&p=1200&mforum=tok) http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/templates/subSilver/images/icon_delete.gif (http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/posting.php?mode=delete&p=1200&sid=6b86097067ca58a1d282a719447661b6) http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/templates/subSilver/images/lang_english/icon_ip.gif (http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/modcp.php?mode=ip&p=1200&t=192&sid=6b86097067ca58a1d282a719447661b6)

I was married in neighbouring DR and was taken aback by the poverty there and humbled a bit by the comparative luxury we were enjoying. When I got back, I read up a bit more on the area and its history. If the DR had it bad, it was nothing to the hardships both natural and political, across the border.

Although the two nations differ hugely in ethnicity, language and culture, the Haitian influences are so strong that they permeate the entire Island. Their culture is rich and vibrant despite all that has happened, I truly hope they can recover and the world puts a fraction of the effort into assisting them that they put into warmongering for natural resources elsewhere.

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:03 PM
Yes, that is very immediate reaction and reporting.

I was in a very small earthquake once and it was the most terrifying thing I ever experienced. You want to grab the children and run but there's nowhere safe to run to.

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:03 PM
http://www.yele.org/about-us/ (http://www.yele.org/about-us/)

Wycliffe Jean's appeal is reportedly Haitian run and is easy to give money to through this site.

Port au Prince looks almost as if a nuclear bomb has dropped.

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:04 PM
Geoeye and Google have updated Satellite Images which show the devastation in Haiti ...

Can be viewed here and possible to scroll around using the embedded version in this Site for example

GeoEye Haiti Satellite Images (http://www.islandcrisis.net/2010/01/geoeye-haiti-satellite-images/)

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:05 PM
estouxim posted


I´m outraged!!!
Obama has just elevated adding insult to injury to a new dimension. As if it was not perverse enough to appoint Clinton as special envoy to Haiti, the nomination of Bush to "help" him is a new record in cynicism:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704281204575003433920577398.html?m od=WSJ_WSJ_US_News_5 (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704281204575003433920577398.html?m od=WSJ_WSJ_US_News_5)

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:05 PM
Ah Well


Just seen this online .... Cruise Ships still docking on the North Coast of Haiti ... hell on earth continues to be played out to the South

Yes, yes I know their presence is good for local economy and all that ... but I'm not in the better of having read this tbh

http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/images/smiles/icon_sad.gif

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:06 PM
youngdan posted


It must be easy to outrage you. Have you seen any change yet

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:08 PM
Yes - it seems very odd that if that port is functioning and Port au Prince isn't that they can't make some use of it.

It would seem to make sense to evacuate some people to places where aid can be got. 60 milies is 2 -3 days walk.

There are planes taking embassy staff away. I hope they are not arriving empty.

Once its not in the way, holidays in Haiti are probably the best thing we could do, but at the moment it just seems like dancing on graves.

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:10 PM
Ah Well posted




Yep, Haiti was a godforsaken full of human misery type of place for the majority of its inhabitants a few weeks ago anyway ... now one could argue it's just even more of a godforsaken place full of increased human misery and for a lot of additional people too ....

And even if the earthquake had not occurred these cruise ships would have been calling regardless to a godforsaken full of human misery place anyway ...

Hard call ..... maybe cruise visits could have been suspended for a few weeks ... but that would prob add misery to the lives of other inhabitants there with no other form of gainful employment...

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:11 PM
estouxim posted



Well, considering that the airport is nearly in the center of Port-au-Prince and that there is a large unbuilt area adjacent to it, it seems that the first thing to do would be to bring the people there. Maybe 1 hour walk from the furthest perimeter. Take a look:

http://maps.google.pt/maps/empw?url=http:%2F%2Fmaps.google.pt%2Fmaps%3Fhl%3Dp t-PT%26ie%3DUTF8%26ll%3D18.577918,-72.314672%26spn%3D0.042144,0.055189%26t%3Dh%26z%3D 14%26output%3Dembed&hl=pt-PT&gl=pt (http://maps.google.pt/maps/empw?url=http:%2F%2Fmaps.google.pt%2Fmaps%3Fhl%3Dp t-PT%26ie%3DUTF8%26ll%3D18.577918,-72.314672%26spn%3D0.042144,0.055189%26t%3Dh%26z%3D 14%26output%3Dembed&hl=pt-PT&gl=pt)

So, in all the news what we hear again and again is that it's extremely dificult to move the aid to the people. It's the roads, the security, the security, the security...
Why not bring the people to the aid, as you so rightly sugest?



Quote:Once its not in the way, holidays in Haiti are probably the best thing we could do, but at the moment it just seems like dancing on graves.


Guess who spent (or maybe not) (http://www.innovationsinnewspapers.com/index.php/2010/01/18/double-cheking-the-clintons-honeymoons/)their honeymoon in Duvalier's paradise...

It seems Mrs Clinton yesterday's visit closed the airport for three hours. Wonder if the photoop was worth it.

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:12 PM
The US response to Hurricane Katrina was so disfunctional, morally and in terms of action, that it is unconscionable that they have been allowed to take over the airport.
Even now, they probably are trying to sell franchises to the Golden Nugget and Gloopy Donuts & Co. to sell food to the population of Port au Prince, with armed guards at the tills.

Most of the work now of buying bodies and digging has been done by Haitians, according to reports this morning on Newstalk.

The best way of distributing emergency aid would be to ask the Haitians to organise themselves and assist in distribution.

The Haitians should form action councils based on whatever area or group they think most efficient - in fact, this may be happening - the burials appear to be well organised.

They should distribute the aid themselves, working through the Haitian government and in liaison with those supplying aid.

They could not do worse than the outside "experts" are doing.

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:13 PM
Ah Well posted

EU Foreign Affairs Council Meet Press Conference due to start in approx 10 mins

Live and On-Demand Streaming - Council of the European Union (http://video.consilium.europa.eu/index.php?pl=&sessionno=2741&lang=EN)

or

RTÉ Ireland's National Television and Radio Broadcaster (http://www.rte.ie/live/)

ZANU-FF
25-03-2010, 10:17 PM
Sida ?

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:19 PM
Thanks - it seems to be delayed - for 12.00 midday now.

Goal is making sound criticisms of the response in Haiti.

I'm lobbing them a few bob on the credit card http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif

I am sickened by the fact that people are going to be let die of thirst while people sit on their hands.

People can manage for a week or so without food, but not without water.

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:20 PM
Ah Well posted




Yep things are far from ideal in the relief mission that's for sure ... nor will they be ideal anytime soon I'd be thinking

Still ... waiting for a positive future thinking step to be taken by the EU here ... maybe that's a deluded hope ... here's hoping anyway http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

C. Flower
25-03-2010, 10:20 PM
Aid will be sent, but it is all very political and it will be too late for a lot of people. Effectively, there has been a US occupation of Haiti, that up to the earthquake had UN/IMF presence. The airport has been used for ferrying out white expats and ferrying in military and State Department people. while some field hospitals and food aid have been turned away.

I haven't heard if the PMs of the other islands have been allowed in yet.

The reflex from the EU will be to try to muster a semblance of Lisbon type integration of military/civil aid, as Dick Roche put forward yesterday on Newstalk.

It is about zones of influence, not about getting water into people before they are dead

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 10:44 PM
Posted on Tok 16 January by estouxim


The Militarization of Emergency Aid to Haiti: Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion?

Michel Chossudovsky (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=17000)

shows pictures of some of the emergency relief equipment Obama is sending to Haiti. And he puts some numbers on them.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 10:46 PM
Jan 16

There are the same disgraceful racist pictures being painted of what is happening as happened after Hurricane Katrina. Does anyone remember tabloid press stories of gang war, rape and robbery in the conference centre, that turned out to be total invention ?
I posted a link on another thread here last night, from the Herald, which confirmed that exaggerated stories about violence had been put out.
This to my mind is a US invasion carried out on a people devastated by natural disaster. Send the doctors in my all means, but under a proper arrangement with the Haitian government. I would like to know when they propose to leave.
I'm just linking the thread on the history of Haiti here
http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=208&mforum=tok
To describe people taking food and bedding from destroyed shops as looting, when there is no food supply, no water and no organised relief, is either stupid or deliberately blackening the name of the people of Haiti.
Cue - these people are to blame for their situation as they are savage - which is already being seen around the internet.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 10:47 PM
Posted by estouxim Jan 16


To describe people taking food and bedding from destroyed shops as looting, when there is no food supply, no water and no organised relief, is either stupid or deliberately blackening the name of the people of Haiti.
Cue - these people are to blame for their situation as they are savage - which is already being seen around the internet.
Exactly, that's the spin that is being spread, starting right after the first news of the quake.
In 2010 both legislative and presidential elections should take place. Fanmi Lavalas, Jean-Bertrand Aristide's party, has been excluded from the last Senate elections (90% of voters boycotted it) and has again been excluded from the Feb. parliamentary election.
State structures have been dismantled, not by the quake but by both IMF under Clinton and US/UN under Bush interventions. The lack of response following the quake will increase support fot Lavalas. The elections will most probably be postponed or suspended. This is imo the reason for all this concentration of military means. A Lavalas victory, wich is certain if it is allowed to run, would see the return and certain election of Aristide. This is unaceptable for the US, the lat thing they want is another ALBA member. No matter how many lifes it takes.
The spin is therefore necessary in order to legitimize, on the eyes of the public, the sending of troops instead of rescuers and doctors.
Equally, the bullshit about the airport was the PR operation to justify it's control by US military. They have allready taken possetion of it.
Two-faced Democracy in Haiti (http://haitiaction.net/News/HIP/11_26_9/11_26_9.html)

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 10:48 PM
Then they will let as many die as possible.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 10:49 PM
Posted by estouxim Jan 16





cactusflower wrote:Then they will let as many die as possible.


That is what I fear. Haiti has allways been used as an warning example. They mean to keep it that way.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 10:50 PM
The US is controlling the airport and there are disagreements over access

France's Cooperation Minister Alain Joyandet told The Associated Press that he had filed an official complaint to the U.S. government after two French planes, one carrying a field hospital, were denied permission to land.
A plane carrying the prime ministers of two Caribbean nations also was forced to turn back late Friday due to a lack of space at the airport, the Caricom trade bloc announced.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/cb_haiti_earthquake
If anyone has any good leads on the best way to send money/aid, or to give political help, please post. We'll put an announcement up.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 10:56 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/02880419533791953494195432600;_ylt=AlnrD1i2uYTv8Bx 88IbPeZq9IxIF;_ylu=


Louisiana became the 18th of the United States back in 1812, but you'd never have known it watching the Federal government's ham-fisted response to 2005's Hurricane Katrina. The Obama Administration is doing things differently: Haiti, for all intents and purposes, became the 51st state at 4:53 p.m. Tuesday in the wake of its deadly earthquake. If not a state, then at least a ward of the state - the United States - as Washington mobilized national resources to rush urgent aid to Haiti's stricken people. "Our nation has a unique capacity to reach out quickly and broadly and to deliver assistance that can save lives," President Obama said Friday. "That responsibility obviously is magnified when the devastation that's been suffered is so near to us." (See how to help the Haiti victims.)

Obama has already dispatched a senior member of his national security team, Deputy National Security Adviser Denis McDonough, to the scene. An armada of U.S. warships is steaming toward Haiti, to be joined by at least one Coast Guard cutter en route from the Pacific via the Panama Canal - and manned and unmanned aircraft. Within two hours of the quake, one of the globe's biggest warships, the carrier USS Carl Vinson, was ordered from off the Virginia coast toward Haiti, swapping its jet fighters for heavy-lift helicopters as it steamed south at top speed. Three ships, including the Vinson and the hospital ship USNS Comfort, boast state-of-the-art medical facilities that will care for injured Haitians. Thousands of troops are on their way to Haiti or already there, running the airport and clearing ports for many more to follow. Up to 10,000 troops will be in Haiti or floating just offshore by Monday. 


C. Flower
13-04-2010, 10:58 PM
Candide posted



Can we assume Rivada is there?

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 10:59 PM
Yes, if not there now, as soon as they think its safe to go in and pick over the pieces.

The extent to which Haiti has been subjected to repeat invasion, massacres, CIA backed coups and gross theft of their resources and revenues is shocking to me, even though I thought nothing much could surprise me at this stage - this time line just goes up to 2002. The US army went in again in 2004. At this stage, sending the army in is a reflex and any idea that the US state has any concern for the lives of Haitians for the birds.

http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/43a/396.html[/quote]

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 11:00 PM
16,000 is the number of troops recommended by in 2004 as necessary to invade Haiti.

16,000 is what they are getting.

http://www.rte.ie/news/2010/0121/1news_av.html?2685849,null,230?2685877,null,230 (http://www.rte.ie/news/2010/0121/1news_av.html?2685849,null,230?2685877,null,230)

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 11:01 PM
Quote: I wish to thank you for your email to Minister Martin outlining yourconcerns regarding the relief efforts in Haiti in the aftermath of theearthquake. Minister Martin has asked me to reply to you on his behalf. The UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) hasconfirmed that a coordination platform has been created between WorldFood Programme (which is in charge of humanitarian logistics under theUN), the US Air Force and MINUSTAH (United Nations Stabilisation Missionin Haiti) to facilitate the arrival of life-saving cargo, includinglanding clearance procedures and criteria for prioritisation. Thecoordinating group meets nightly to discuss the day's events andplanning for the coming day. In addition, the UN is working closely with the US military on thecoordination of air traffic at the Port au Prince airport. Whilecongestion at the airport remains a problem, due to its small size,damage to the control tower and the volume of incoming traffic,alternatives to the airport are now available. These include the portsat Port-au-Prince and elsewhere, and an air-bridge and overland routefrom the Dominican Republic. The Irish Government recently used thisoverland route to ship 84 tonnes of humanitarian supplies to Haiti fromour stockpiles. These included tents, blankets and kitchen sets whichhave been distributed by Goal and Concern. A further shipment of 40tonnes will be sent shortly. Ireland and the wider international humanitarian community will continueto closely monitor the response to the needs of the people in Haiti andthe manner in which it is delivered. Again, on behalf of Minister Martin, I wish to thank you for forwardingyour concerns for the people of Haiti.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 11:02 PM
Posted by estouxim Feb 09

From what I have been seeing the spin on msm has shifted from "food riots" to "government corruption".

The Fateful Geological Prize Called Haiti (http://www.voltairenet.org/article163808.html) by F. William Engdahl is revealing.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 11:03 PM
Xray posted Feb 09

think the Americans are right to deploy their military for this. they have a vast capability and this is a very positive way to use it. Sure its messy, mistakes will be made and its easy find fault, but far better that than them all sitting on a ship off the coast thinking about helping.

The American military like any weapon or resource is not evil in itself, it is how it is used that can be evil. They simply obey their political masters. I think this is a brave and honourable use of this resource.

Why in the name of god would anybody want to take over haiti. Frankly if I were Haitian I would be praying for the USA to take over. In reality they will bore of the place in a few weeks and leave then to it.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 11:03 PM
http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/templates/subSilver/images/icon_minipost.gif (http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=2545&mforum=tok#2545)Posted: 09 Feb 2010 11:44 pm Post subject: http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/templates/subSilver/images/lang_english/icon_quote.gif (http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/posting.php?mode=quote&p=2545&mforum=tok) http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/templates/subSilver/images/lang_english/icon_edit.gif (http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/posting.php?mode=editpost&p=2545&mforum=tok) http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/templates/subSilver/images/icon_delete.gif (http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/posting.php?mode=delete&p=2545&sid=6b5b834705bdedb11a52d28662c78c32) http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/templates/subSilver/images/lang_english/icon_ip.gif (http://www.hostingphpbb.com/forum/modcp.php?mode=ip&p=2545&t=223&sid=6b5b834705bdedb11a52d28662c78c32)
The US has invaded Haiti, and occupied it, many times. Why do big powers concern themselves with the islands off their shores ?

Cuba missile crisis could be one reminder. Why have the English not left Ireland ? The Haitian masses are feared and distrusted. They beat the French, Spanish and British in straight military combat in their time. At this stage when Haiti is pretty well ravaged of most of its timber and topsoil resources, the US fears a mass migration of Haitians to the US and has previously interned the Haitians in Guantanamo to deny them refugee status.

The US stayed from 1915-1934 and have never really left since.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 11:04 PM
Estouxim posted

Xray wrote:Why in the name of god would anybody want to take over haiti. Frankly if I were Haitian I would be praying for the USA to take over. In reality they will bore of the place in a few weeks and leave then to it.

Why? The article I linked to above explains a lot.
Quote:Aside from being prone to violent earthquakes, Haiti also happens to lie in a zone that, due to the unusual geographical intersection of its three tectonic plates, might well be straddling one of the world’s largest unexplored zones of oil and gas, as well as of valuable rare strategic minerals.
Quote:Notably, in 2005, a year after the Bush-Cheney Administration de facto deposed the democratically elected President of Haiti, Jean-Bertrand Aristide [1], a team of geologists from the Institute for Geophysics at the University of Texas began an ambitious and thorough two-phase mapping of all geological data of the Caribbean Basins. The project is due to be completed in 2011. Directed by Dr. Paul Mann, it is called “Caribbean Basins, Tectonics and Hydrocarbons.” It is all about determining as precisely as possible the relation between tectonic plates in the Caribbean and the potential for hydrocarbons—oil and gas.
Notably, the sponsors of the multi-million dollar research project under Mann are the world’s largest oil companies, including Chevron, ExxonMobil, the Anglo-Dutch Shell and BHP Billiton. [2] Curiously enough, the project is the first comprehensive geological mapping of a region that, one would have thought, would have been a priority decades ago for the US oil majors. Given the immense, existing oil production off Mexico, Louisiana, and the entire Caribbean, as well as its proximity to the United States – not to mention the US focus on its own energy security – it is surprising that the region had not been mapped earlier. Now it emerges that major oil companies were at least generally aware of the huge oil potential of the region long ago, but apparently decided to keep it quiet.
Quote:Evidence that the US Administration may well have more in mind for Haiti than the improvement of the lot of the devastated Haitian people can be found in nearby waters off Cuba, directly across from Port-au-Prince. In October 2008 a consortium of oil companies led by Spain’s Repsol, together with Cuba’s state oil company, Cubapetroleo, announced discovery of one of the world’s largest oilfields in the deep water off Cuba. It is what oil geologists call a ‘Super-giant’ field. Estimates are that the Cuban field contains as much as 20 billion barrels of oil, making it the twelfth Super-giant oilfield discovered since 1996. The discovery also likely makes Cuba a new high-priority target for Pentagon destabilization and other nasty operations.

On Sunday Al-Jazeera reported that distribution of food was suspended after the benefactors found that some people were holding tickets of a diferent colour than those distributed. The suspension affected thousands of people. I suppose they are now brainstorming in some air conditioned tent behind barbed wire in the airport figuring out a way to make said tickets uncounterfeitable.

There is no Nation that gained so much following the Haitian revolution as the USA. The Louisiana Purchase was a direct consequence of Napolean's defeat in the island. The territories that were traded in that ocasion represent nearly 30% of it's actual area. For that alone they should be forever thankfull to the Haitian. History shows us how they express that gratitude.

The US is there to stay. The means involved are indicative of that intention, as is the recurrent spin on the media.
It will be interesting to see what steps will be taken to set up a new colonial administration.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 11:06 PM
Xray posted

Lets get real, if there is oil and gas in the area US oil companies will be the ones getting it anyway. They dont need to invade for that. For god sake look at our gas. We are a first world wealthy country that is powerful for its size and we had to hand over the goodies immediately to the UK.

I honestly think the best thing Haiti could do is accept american largesse, become a low cost exprted into the USA under favourable trade deals and build a life for people.

We too could be sitting in the 19th century on our high horse refusing to dirty our hands with american or british money. It makes a good pub song, but we would be singing it in an Irish pub abroad.

Why not let the americans take the oil and gas for a good deal in return?
We gave a lot of fish to the EU to join, but we never would have caught them ourselves. The haitians are never going to drill an oil well or feed their people without help. That might be cruel, but it is true.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 11:07 PM
estouxim posted -


Lets get real, if there is oil and gas in the area US oil companies will be the ones getting it anyway. They dont need to invade for that.
Well, I double checked reality. And reality says that the overwhelming majority of Haitians voted for a man that wants the resources of the land to be used in the benefit of the citizens of the land. That man, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, as been removed from power by american military intervention. He was literally kidnaped from the now ruined presidential palace and flown to the Central African Republic. He is now in South Africa, banned from returning home, his followers banned from participating in the political process. They are still the majority and would easily win any election. That's one of the reasons.
A little more Engdahl:

No doubt to the dismay of Washington, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev flew to Havana one month after the Cuban giant oil find to sign an agreement with acting-President Raul Castro for Russian oil companies to explore and develop Cuban oil. [3]
Medvedev’s Russia-Cuba oil agreements came only a week after the visit of Chinese President Hu Jintao to meet the recuperating Fidel Castro and his brother Raul. The Chinese President signed an agreement to modernize Cuban ports and discussed Chinese purchase of Cuban raw materials. No doubt the mammoth new Cuban oil discovery was high on the Chinese agenda with Cuba. [4] On November 5, 2008, just prior to the Chinese President’s trip to Cuba and other Latin American countries, the Chinese government issued their first ever policy paper on the future of China’s relations with Latin America and Caribbean nations, elevating these bilateral relations to a new level of strategic importance. [5]
In the real world, today, there are alternatives to american oil giants, even at the US doorstep. They are allready present in the backyard, in Venezuela, Equador, Bolivia, Brasil. It is not, as you assume, an inevitability of fate. Rather, it is to assure that they keep that access, on their terms, that intervention is necessary and that all oportunities should be grabbed, particularly if they come prior to potentially adverse politicall events such as elections. Parliamentary elections were schedulled for this month, I haven't seen a printed word about what will happen to them. Presidential elections are schedulled for the end of the year.
Speaking of largesse, Haitians have been enjoying US largesse since at least 1915. They allready are a low cost exporter to the US. To the detriment of their agricultural self-suficiency that was destroyed in that process. And they still are the poorest country of the America's. They think, as their vote as shown that another way is necessary. I happen to agree with that.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 11:09 PM
Lets get real, if there is oil and gas in the area US oil companies will be the ones getting it anyway. They dont need to invade for that.
Well, I double checked reality. And reality says that the overwhelming majority of Haitians voted for a man that wants the resources of the land to be used in the benefit of the citizens of the land. That man, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, as been removed from power by american military intervention. He was literally kidnaped from the now ruined presidential palace and flown to the Central African Republic. He is now in South Africa, banned from returning home, his followers banned from participating in the political process. They are still the majority and would easily win any election. That's one of the reasons.
A little more Engdahl:

No doubt to the dismay of Washington, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev flew to Havana one month after the Cuban giant oil find to sign an agreement with acting-President Raul Castro for Russian oil companies to explore and develop Cuban oil. [3]
Medvedev’s Russia-Cuba oil agreements came only a week after the visit of Chinese President Hu Jintao to meet the recuperating Fidel Castro and his brother Raul. The Chinese President signed an agreement to modernize Cuban ports and discussed Chinese purchase of Cuban raw materials. No doubt the mammoth new Cuban oil discovery was high on the Chinese agenda with Cuba. [4] On November 5, 2008, just prior to the Chinese President’s trip to Cuba and other Latin American countries, the Chinese government issued their first ever policy paper on the future of China’s relations with Latin America and Caribbean nations, elevating these bilateral relations to a new level of strategic importance. [5]
In the real world, today, there are alternatives to american oil giants, even at the US doorstep. They are allready present in the backyard, in Venezuela, Equador, Bolivia, Brasil. It is not, as you assume, an inevitability of fate. Rather, it is to assure that they keep that access, on their terms, that intervention is necessary and that all oportunities should be grabbed, particularly if they come prior to potentially adverse politicall events such as elections. Parliamentary elections were schedulled for this month, I haven't seen a printed word about what will happen to them. Presidential elections are schedulled for the end of the year.
Speaking of largesse, Haitians have been enjoying US largesse since at least 1915. They allready are a low cost exporter to the US. To the detriment of their agricultural self-suficiency that was destroyed in that process. And they still are the poorest country of the America's. They think, as their vote as shown that another way is necessary. I happen to agree with that.
That would be nice, but it is not going to happen. What might happen is that someone like clinton in the USA might be able to improve their lot over the next few years. Even that is a long shot though. Haiti like many third world countries has been totally raped by the powerful states, but becoming Cuba mark two at this stage is not the answer. It wont be long until Cuba is playing exactly the same game themselves.
I could not see the americans allowing anyone else have the use of the oil in that area. They will happily pay the haitians for using it, I would suggest they accept and do the best deal possible. I would rather americans with helicopters were flying over with dinners and water rather than the alternative.

C. Flower
13-04-2010, 11:11 PM
estouxim posted

Xray wrote:That would be nice, but it is not going to happen. What might happen is that someone like clinton in the USA might be able to improve their lot over the next few years. Even that is a long shot though. Haiti like many third world countries has been totally raped by the powerful states, but becoming Cuba mark two at this stage is not the answer. It wont be long until Cuba is playing exactly the same game themselves.
I could not see the americans allowing anyone else have the use of the oil in that area. They will happily pay the haitians for using it, I would suggest they accept and do the best deal possible. I would rather americans helicopters were flying over with dinners and water than the alternative.

Well, if you look at the last decade in Latin America I think you will find that the Cuban alternative is becoming not only increasingly popular but furthermore possible. The shift to the left is a reality and the Latin American left reclaims and reviews itself on the Cuban model. In spite of the allmost absolute control of mass media by the oligarchies what we see is a very diferent picture than our western media driven elections. There was a picture of a demonstration in Brasil I stumbled upon once where you could see an hand written banner saying "your newspapers are what we use to wipe our asses with."

Therefore I wouldn't discard the Cuba# so lightly, it would only follow the path Venezuela, Equador, Bolivia, Nicaragua are allready engaged in. I don't see why, if the democratic process is allowed to proceed, that would not be a successfull option for Haiti. The troops are there precisely to prevent that.

As for the capacity of the Yankees to preserve their backyard, Helsinki, free trade and the Asian wars have very much destroyed it. South America is increasingly turning to the other shore of the Pacific in detriment of their traditional European and North American trade.[/u]

C. Flower
14-04-2010, 12:18 AM
The threads on Haiti were started on Tok and interrupted by the move here: I've brought them here because none of the problems have gone away.
This blog gives some update on how things are going for Haiti.

http://haitianpoliticsforum.blogspot.com/

It was fitting that the March 31st "International Donors Conference Towards a New Future for Haiti" was held in the Trusteeship Council at the United Nations headquarters in New York. At the event, Haitian President René Préval in effect turned over the keys to Haiti to a consortium of foreign banks and governments, which will decide how (to use the conference's principal slogan) to "build back better" the country devastated by the Jan. 12 earthquake.

This "better" Haiti envisions some 25,000 farmers providing Coca-Cola with mangos for a new Odwalla brand drink, 100,000 workers assembling clothing and electronics for the U.S. market in sweatshops under HOPE II legislation, and thousands more finding jobs as guides, waiters, cleaners and drivers when Haiti becomes a new tourist destination.

"Haiti could be the first all-wireless nation in the Caribbean," gushed UN Special Envoy to Haiti Bill Clinton, who along with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, led the day-long meeting of over 150 nations and international institutions. Clinton got the idea for a "wireless nation," not surprisingly, from Brad Horwitz, the CEO of Trilogy, the parent company of Voilà, Haiti's second largest cell-phone network.

C. Flower
01-05-2010, 02:35 AM
Fox News reports now that most of the UN's very large Haiti budget is going on its own staff.

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2010/04/20/uns-massive-haiti-budget-goes-staff/

C. Flower
09-07-2010, 01:54 PM
6 months since the earthquake, so I'm bumping our Haiti threads that were moved over from Tok. This one reads a bit oddly, as I seem to have left some names of posters out and appear to be talking to myself :(.

C. Flower
23-10-2010, 03:48 PM
Things are not good in Haiti - from programmes I've watched on tv, there's been very little progress on rebuilding and a lot of people are still in very inadquate camps.

Cholera is bad news.
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2010/1023/breaking13.html

C. Flower
24-10-2010, 07:51 PM
http://www.undispatch.com/why-cholera-in-haiti-why-now

Why is there cholera in Haiti now ?


Melinda Miles, Director of Let Haiti Live, expressed her frustration to UN Dispatch today, “Considering that an outbreak of this nature was predicted nine months ago, it is absolutely stunning that so little was in place to prepare for it.”
She also fears for the future impact of the outbreak “The potential impact of cholera in the city of Port-au-Prince is a terrifying vision – in addition to the more than one million people living in official camps, many others are living in tents on side streets and in their yards, and very few have access to potable water or sanitary facilities. It is certain that many unnecessary deaths will be the result of poor planning and slow response.”
We’ll know very soon if this is an outbreak or an epidemic. Either way, it’s the result of slow earthquake response, and children are going to suffer the most.



A dysfunctional puppet Government and a US military intervention designed for social control not reconstruction, have left the Haitian population in a desperately vulnerable situation.

C. Flower
30-10-2010, 07:46 PM
Channel4 is reporting demonstrations by Haitians against UN troops who they say brought cholera into the country. The UN is apparently not denying it.

C. Flower
04-11-2010, 06:50 PM
A lot of people are living in tents and shacks and a severe storm is approaching.

http://reut.rs/a908Gn

The Haitian situation somehow looks almost genocidal.


Angry earthquake survivors in Haiti disrupted an attempted evacuation on Thursday of a resettlement camp as Tropical Storm Tomas bore down on the poor Caribbean country already reeling from a cholera epidemic and destruction from the quake.

Tomas was expected to hit Haiti on Thursday night, battering the stark and largely deforested land with gusting wind, surging waves and torrential rains of up to 10 or 15 inches in some areas.

President Rene Preval went on national radio to urge citizens to take precautions and follow evacuation recommendations. "Protect your lives," he said.

An effort to move some 2,000 people from Corail, an exposed camp outside Port-au-Prince set up by the United Nations and aid groups to resettle homeless quake survivors, was obstructed by camp dwellers worried that authorities were trying to permanently move them out.

More than 100 yelling youths broke tables set up by aid workers to process the evacuees from the tent and tarpaulin camp of some 7,700 people located at the base of several bare hills outside of the Haitian capital.

Aid workers say the camp's location at the confluence of several streams makes it particularly vulnerable to flooding.

"We are upset because they have not told us where we are going," said Domarcand Fenel, the head of a committee of camp residents. "People believe they want to expel us."

About 1.3 million survivors of the January 12 quake that killed more than a quarter of a million people in the Western Hemisphere's poorest nation are still living in makeshift camps crammed into open spaces in the capital.

C. Flower
09-11-2010, 02:25 AM
Al Jazeera is reporting that more than 8,000 people have cholera and more than 500 people have died of it.

It's water borne and the camps are awash after the floods. There are cases reported in Port au Prince.

Indiana Jones
09-11-2010, 01:40 PM
Posted on Tok 16 January by estouxim


The Militarization of Emergency Aid to Haiti: Is it a Humanitarian Operation or an Invasion?

Michel Chossudovsky (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=17000)

shows pictures of some of the emergency relief equipment Obama is sending to Haiti. And he puts some numbers on them.


Even if Americans were the crass militarists this thead implies, there is nothing, nor has there ever been anything in Haiti that America wants or needs. We react from a compassionate motivation, seeing too clearly how Haiti has been abandoned by those who created the problem in the first place, and then abandoned it for the same reason one presumes: there was nothing there left for them to exploit, and it was simply too distant to bother with - out of sight out of mind.

Haiti earthquake relief (http://www.defense.gov/home/features/2010/0110_haiti/)

The US Marine Corps has long had a special relationship with Haiti; I remember Communications School at Marine Corps Base MCRD San Diego in 1960, we had Haitian enlisted men training to use the "modern" equipment and methods we were training in so that they could be integrated into modern global society.

There is a reason it is the Marines who are going to aid Haiti; the Marines have long had a special relationship with Haiti, going back to 1915. (The United States Occupation of Haiti (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_occupation_of_Haiti)…) Of course there is the reality that Haiti is an island nation, and the Marines are the physical off-ship-presence of the US Navy. An aircraft carrier, a ship we don't often see many Marines on, is the best physical platform for the delivery of emergency material and supplies because it has, being a floating city with a complete medical hospital aboard, the capacity to move large numbers of injured to and fro from land to ship with its augmented aerial capacity. Besides the usual USN ships there are the sub-class of USN ships devoted to helicopter landings for transport back and forth from land to sea platforms. US Marines are proud to be a part of an operation to help Haiti, even though their primary MOS (Military Occupational Specialty) is "Infantry-Man."


Friday January 22, 2010
Twenty Second Marine Expeditionary Unit delivers aid to Haiti's southern coast (http://www.usmc.mil/unit/22ndmeu/Pages/22ndMEUdeliversaidtoHaiti'ssoutherncoast.aspx)


Saturday Nov 6, 2010 10:26:49 EDT
Five hundred Marines, Sailor ready to help in Haiti (http://www.navytimes.com/news/2010/11/marine-haiti-hurricane-thomas-110510/)


What this thread illustrates is that no good turn goes unpunished by those who don't engage but stand off to the side as critics. Why don't the critics get off their dead a***s and pitch in; fly in some people, turn a hand to help instead of just curling their lips in a cynical snear?

C. Flower
09-11-2010, 02:05 PM
Even if Americans were the crass militarists this thead implies, there is nothing, nor has there ever been anything in Haiti that America wants or needs. We react from a compassionate motivation, seeing too clearly how Haiti has been abandoned by those who created the problem in the first place, and then abandoned it for the same reason one presumes: there was nothing there left for them to exploit, and it was simply too distant to bother with - out of sight out of mind.

Haiti earthquake relief (http://www.defense.gov/home/features/2010/0110_haiti/)

The US Marine Corps has long had a special relationship with Haiti; I remember Communications School at Marine Corps Base MCRD San Diego in 1960, we had Haitian enlisted men training to use the "modern" equipment and methods we were training in so that they could be integrated into modern global society.

There is a reason it is the Marines who are going to aid Haiti; the Marines have long had a special relationship with Haiti, going back to 1915. (The United States Occupation of Haiti (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_occupation_of_Haiti)…) Of course there is the reality that Haiti is an island nation, and the Marines are the physical off-ship-presence of the US Navy. An aircraft carrier, a ship we don't often see many Marines on, is the best physical platform for the delivery of emergency material and supplies because it has, being a floating city with a complete medical hospital aboard, the capacity to move large numbers of injured to and fro from land to ship with its augmented aerial capacity. Besides the usual USN ships there are the sub-class of USN ships devoted to helicopter landings for transport back and forth from land to sea platforms. US Marines are proud to be a part of an operation to help Haiti, even though their primary MOS (Military Occupational Specialty) is "Infantry-Man."


Friday January 22, 2010
Twenty Second Marine Expeditionary Unit delivers aid to Haiti's southern coast (http://www.usmc.mil/unit/22ndmeu/Pages/22ndMEUdeliversaidtoHaiti'ssoutherncoast.aspx)


Saturday Nov 6, 2010 10:26:49 EDT
Five hundred Marines, Sailor ready to help in Haiti (http://www.navytimes.com/news/2010/11/marine-haiti-hurricane-thomas-110510/)


What this thread illustrates is that no good turn goes unpunished by those who don't engage but stand off to the side as critics. Why don't the critics get of their dead ***** and pitch in?

The US invasion ran off aid flights and obstructed medical supplies and medical personel.

Nothing you say contradicts the evidence of the history of the US's invasions, occupations and sponsored coups in Haiti.

Indiana Jones
09-11-2010, 02:40 PM
The US invasion ran off aid flights and obstructed medical supplies and medical personel.

Nothing you say contradicts the evidence of the history of the US's invasions, occupations and sponsored coups in Haiti.

I won't deny that many of our actions, when they have needed to be have been harsh in Haiti. But we have done our best to keep it from descending into an ever more violent case down there. For us the benefits have been nil.

C. Flower
09-11-2010, 03:31 PM
I won't deny that many of our actions, when they have needed to be have been harsh in Haiti. But we have done our best to keep it from descending into an ever more violent case down there. For us the benefits have been nil.

Are you suggesting that 10,000 + troops were moved in as a charitable operation? Would that not be pretty stupid?

Of course, it's not true. Haiti is of strategic geopolitical value to the US.
A presence in Haiti is an additional pressure on Cuba and indeed the invasion may have been a "dry run" for a Cuban landing.

The US action in Haiti aims at achieving a number of self interested benefits

- to prevent a mass exodus of refugees to the US
- to prevent a radical government coming to power in Haiti and linking up with Cuba and Venezuela
- to get the benefit of a pool of cheap labour for US corporations
- to provide a strategic military base from which Cuba and the rest of the Caribbean can be kept under military pressure.

There may be others that I've overlooked.

Indiana Jones
09-11-2010, 05:20 PM
Are you suggesting that 10,000 + troops were moved in as a charitable operation? Would that not be pretty stupid?

Of course, it's not true. Haiti is of strategic geopolitical value to the US.
A presence in Haiti is an additional pressure on Cuba and indeed the invasion may have been a "dry run" for a Cuban landing.

The US action in Haiti aims at achieving a number of self interested benefits

- to prevent a mass exodus of refugees to the US
- to prevent a radical government coming to power in Haiti and linking up with Cuba and Venezuela
- to get the benefit of a pool of cheap labour for US corporations
- to provide a strategic military base from which Cuba and the rest of the Caribbean can be kept under military pressure.

There may be others that I've overlooked.

to prevent a mass exodus of refugees to the US
We believe Haitians should stay in Haiti to reform their country

to prevent a radical government coming to power in Haiti and linking up with Cuba and Venezuela
That would be a problem for the whole region, but in spite of all that has happened America is popular among Haitians, and although there might be a short-term victory in such an event for Cuba and Venezuela, Cuba on their own can't benefit much of anyone; their economy is in such dire straits. And, yes, once that happened it would be a situation we could not ignore.

to get the benefit of a pool of cheap labour for US corporationsHas there been any such establishment of manufacturing operations there? The labor base cannot be exported.

to provide a strategic military base from which Cuba and the rest of the Caribbean can be kept under military pressure
We have always had that option, and it hasn't played out that way.
We already have a naval base right on Cuba itself - which is what Gauntanamo - and the detention facility there is only a minor presence; we also have naval facilities on Vieques Island, PR, and in Panama

Are you suggesting that 10,000 + troops were moved in as a charitable operation? Would that not be pretty stupid?
We shall see soon enough, but when we move on as we always have your assertion will have been long forgotten by both of us.

antiestablishmentarian
09-11-2010, 05:20 PM
The US has always intervened in Haiti for its own reasons, none of them being altruistic. They have toppled governments that they perceive to threaten their interets like the Aristide government, they backed the Duvalier butchers because they kept wages low through persecution of trade unions and socialists, and they continue to back 'pro-business' governments like the Preval regime who have been responsible for privatising Haiti's national cement industry, telecommunications, and opening Haitian agriculture up to 'dumping' practices by selling the State flour company.

Haiti has the resources to rebuild itself, but is prevented from doing so by the IMF and their US backers, who insist on the continued fire-sale of State resources to company's like Continental Grain who have extensive contacts with the US political administration. These are resources which would have allowed Haitians to rebuild their own lives which they are being denied access to.

http://dailycensored.com/2010/03/11/haitian-voodoo-economics/

http://www.allbusiness.com/caribbean/262408-1.html

Indiana Jones
09-11-2010, 05:32 PM
The US has always intervened in Haiti for its own reasons, none of them being altruistic. They have toppled governments that they perceive to threaten their interets like the Aristide government, they backed the Duvalier butchers because they kept wages low through persecution of trade unions and socialists, and they continue to back 'pro-business' governments like the Preval regime who have been responsible for privatising Haiti's national cement industry, telecommunications, and opening Haitian agriculture up to 'dumping' practices by selling the State flour company.

Haiti has the resources to rebuild itself, but is prevented from doing so by the IMF and their US backers, who insist on the continued fire-sale of State resources to company's like Continental Grain who have extensive contacts with the US political administration. These are resources which would have allowed Haitians to rebuild their own lives which they are being denied access to.

http://dailycensored.com/2010/03/11/haitian-voodoo-economics/

http://www.allbusiness.com/caribbean/262408-1.html

I agree that the IMF causes more problems than it solves. The same class of people run the IMF that are the highest staff members at the United Nations and the World Bank. When Bush appointed Paul Wolfowitz in 2005 to head up and reform the WB, a way was found to eject him in record time

C. Flower
15-11-2010, 10:15 PM
There are riots and anti-UN protests in two Haitian cities today, demanding the UN should leave.
The immediate reason is that the UN troops brought cholera to Haiti, which did not have it before (more than 900 dead, so far). There is a history of resistance in Haiti to the UN troop presence, from before the earthquake.

http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/7342656-haiti-rioters-stone-un-troops-blame-them-for-cholera

Gadfly
16-11-2010, 06:25 PM
There are riots and anti-UN protests in two Haitian cities today, demanding the UN should leave.
The immediate reason is that the UN troops brought cholera to Haiti, which did not have it before (more than 900 dead, so far). There is a history of resistance in Haiti to the UN troop presence, from before the earthquake.

http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/7342656-haiti-rioters-stone-un-troops-blame-them-for-cholera

Invasion ...yes . US invasion because of oil in the coastal Haiti.

Sam Lord
17-11-2010, 04:09 AM
Lengthy interview with Aristide here:

http://www.rabble.ca/news/2010/11/exclusive-aristide-haiti%E2%80%99s-earthquake-cholera-election-reparation-and-exile

Andrew49
25-11-2010, 05:42 PM
Suffering, Haitians Turn to Charismatic Prayer

The pastor likes to sing in tongues on his daily walk around the park. Certain women in his parish say so many Hail Marys on their own that he no longer assigns them the prayers as penance for sins; instead, he may prescribe a pedicure. Catholicism suffuses Haitian history and identity. French colonists converted African slaves, who mixed Catholic and African rituals into Haitian voodoo, the religion revering spirits and ancestors that many Haitians still practice alongside Catholicism. Toussaint L’Ouverture, who led Haiti in the world’s only victorious slave rebellion, was Catholic. The country’s elite schools are Catholic. Even its lottery stands have names like Angel of God.

Source (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/25/nyregion/25nychaiti.html?_r=1&ref=global-home)

Imagine if you replaced every 20 clergymen/women with a medical doctor and teacher .....

C. Flower
12-01-2011, 09:24 PM
A year since the earthquake. Haiti is still occupied and it seems very little of Port au Prince has been rebuilt. More than 3,000 people have died from cholera, brought in by the UN troops.

Count Bobulescu
15-01-2011, 09:31 PM
I’m no fan of US militarism, and I disagree with Indiana Jones on other issues, but I think he has it about right here. This military conspiracy talk is fantasy. The bulk of US troops are long gone from Haiti. Those that remain are in an advisory capacity. Likewise, the claim that the UN introduced Cholera, either deliberately or accidentally. Remember, in the immediate aftermath of the quake the airport and seaport was unserviceable. Nothing could get in. Closest airport, San Juan, Puerto Rico, a ten hour drive. US military is one few, maybe the only institution in the world with the capacity to react swiftly, and it was CLOSEST to the problem. US military opened the air and sea ports and started to turn authority over to the civilian organizations.

As to aid being scared away. Lots of stories here too about aircraft loaded with aid stuck on the ground unable to take off, because of the capacity restrictions at Port au Prince, and priority had to be given to aircraft from Brazil, China other countries etc. that were in holding patterns above Port au Prince and in danger of running out of fuel.

Heard a piece on NPR this week commenting on the lack of progress in rebuilding that said, despite the fact that there are many Haitians in need of shelter, income, work, etc. much of the rubble has not yet been cleared away. So rebuilding can’t start. And donors are becoming reluctant to contribute more, because apparently about a billion of the one point six already pumped in is unaccounted for. Does not look good.

Here’s a Guardian chart on who contributed. On a per capita basis, US Gov. $0.13, Irish Gov. $0.15. On a per capita basis Irish public $1.42. US public $3.84. As usual the Scandinavians came out on top.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/jan/14/haiti-quake-aid-pledges-country-donations#data

If you need a country to point a finger at, try France, they forced Haiti to pay millions in reparations but weren’t so good at donating.

If you need to point a finger at the UN or US lots better opportunities. Or just wait until this movie is released in August. Heard most of an hour long interview with the author. Ugly.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0896872/

C. Flower
16-01-2011, 02:21 AM
I’m no fan of US militarism, and I disagree with Indiana Jones on other issues, but I think he has it about right here. This military conspiracy talk is fantasy. The bulk of US troops are long gone from Haiti. Those that remain are in an advisory capacity. Likewise, the claim that the UN introduced Cholera, either deliberately or accidentally. Remember, in the immediate aftermath of the quake the airport and seaport was unserviceable. Nothing could get in. Closest airport, San Juan, Puerto Rico, a ten hour drive. US military is one few, maybe the only institution in the world with the capacity to react swiftly, and it was CLOSEST to the problem. US military opened the air and sea ports and started to turn authority over to the civilian organizations.

As to aid being scared away. Lots of stories here too about aircraft loaded with aid stuck on the ground unable to take off, because of the capacity restrictions at Port au Prince, and priority had to be given to aircraft from Brazil, China other countries etc. that were in holding patterns above Port au Prince and in danger of running out of fuel.

Heard a piece on NPR this week commenting on the lack of progress in rebuilding that said, despite the fact that there are many Haitians in need of shelter, income, work, etc. much of the rubble has not yet been cleared away. So rebuilding can’t start. And donors are becoming reluctant to contribute more, because apparently about a billion of the one point six already pumped in is unaccounted for. Does not look good.

Here’s a Guardian chart on who contributed. On a per capita basis, US Gov. $0.13, Irish Gov. $0.15. On a per capita basis Irish public $1.42. US public $3.84. As usual the Scandinavians came out on top.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/jan/14/haiti-quake-aid-pledges-country-donations#data

If you need a country to point a finger at, try France, they forced Haiti to pay millions in reparations but weren’t so good at donating.

If you need to point a finger at the UN or US lots better opportunities. Or just wait until this movie is released in August. Heard most of an hour long interview with the author. Ugly.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0896872/

I can't agree with you on this Count Bobulescu. I'm not relying on any off the wall sources, and no one has suggested deliberate infection. There was no cholera in Haiti previously. There was never a requirement for tens of thousands of troops in Haiti.

Someone needs to bite the bullet and CPO the city and lay it out afresh. The whole thing could be pegged out first and a valuation put on plots, with people being given plots of equivalent value for reconstruction.

I saw a documentary 6 months ago showing haggling going on over over-priced and unsuitable land for rebuilding. A CPO would sort that out. :)

Count Bobulescu
16-01-2011, 08:17 AM
First up, you misspelled my name, I am sooooooooo outraged!!!!:)

I think our difference of opinion on this issue is really instructive of the trans-Atlantic gap. By US standards I lean left, almost always hold my nose and vote D, wishing that I had more alternatives. You seem further left, and I have no problem with that. With the greatest respect, I think you run a good show here, bbbut, on the Cholera issue, I think you are confusing cause and effect. Cholera didn’t happen because of the UN or US, it
happened because of the earthquake.

C. Flower @44…….Channel4 is reporting demonstrations by Haitians against UN troops who they say brought cholera into the country. The UN is apparently not denying it……..my comment…..hard to prove a negative

C.Flower @58 …More than 3,000 people have died from cholera, brought in by the UN troops (my emphasis). That's a big, and I think unsubstantiated, leap from @44 which itself gives cause for concern.

You say @60 you are not relying on "of the wall" sources, but you haven't cited ANY sources, beyond the claims of (presumably desperate Haitians) reported by C4. Not saying those people are wrong, just saying those are unsubstantiated, and in my view, suspect claims. Please cite some evidence to support your claim.

C. Flower @60 There was never a requirement (my emphasis) for tens of thousands of troops in Haiti.

I agree, so tell me, if the US military had sat on it's hands and not gone in and opened the air and sea ports within a few days to allow civilian aid to flow, who would have done it? The UN, bedeviled by bureaucracy might have got to it eventually, and in the meantime..... the North Koreans, hey they have a big military, but I didn't see much action from them. Hundreds of thousands of Haitians needed food water and medicine urgently. If you were a Haitian in distress, would you refuse help just because the US military made it possible? If the US did not do what it did it would likely have been accused by some of racism, and probably much more. No easy answers. As Indiana Jones said: No good deed goes unpunished. But we understand.

C. Flower
16-01-2011, 12:38 PM
First up, you misspelled my name, I am sooooooooo outraged!!!!:)


Sincere apologies: I've corrected it and it will not happen again ;)



I think our difference of opinion on this issue is really instructive of the trans-Atlantic gap. By US standards I lean left, almost always hold my nose and vote D, wishing that I had more alternatives. You seem further left, and I have no problem with that. With the greatest respect, I think you run a good show here, bbbut, on the Cholera issue, I think you are confusing cause and effect. Cholera didn’t happen because of the UN or US, it
happened because of the earthquake.





You say @60 you are not relying on "of the wall" sources, but you haven't cited ANY sources, beyond the claims of (presumably desperate Haitians) reported by C4. Not saying those people are wrong, just saying those are unsubstantiated, and in my view, suspect claims. Please cite some evidence to support your claim.


You are right that the sources I'd quoted are not adequate. This matter has been fully investigated now and confirm, following tests, that cholera was brought in to Haiti by UN troops from Nepal.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/rest-of-world/UN-troops-brought-cholera-to-Haiti-Report/articleshow/7063975.cms



The cholera epidemic that has caused more than 2,000 deaths in Haiti was introduced by Nepalese troops serving with the UN forces (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/topic/search?q=UN forces) in the impoverished Caribbean (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/topic/Caribbean) country, according to a French medical report.

The disease first appeared in the small central town of Mirebalais, where the Nepalese soldiers set up their camp, and it was first noted just a few days after their arrival, sources close to the probe told EFE here on Tuesday.

The report by Renaud Piarroux, who is considered to be one of the world's leading specialists in the study of cholera, leaves no doubt as to the origin of the disease, the sources said.

The UN Stabilization Mission for Haiti (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/topic/search?q=UN Stabilization Mission for Haiti), or Minustah, has denied that the epidemic was introduced by its forces.

The French foreign ministry confirmed on Tuesday that it transmitted the Piarroux report to UN headquarters in New York (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/topic/New-York). The study was commissioned by France at the request of Haitian authorities, a French diplomatic spokesman said.

According to the report, the appearance of the disease coincides with the arrival of the Nepalese soldiers, who come from a country where there is currently a cholera epidemic.

There is no other way to explain the rapid emergence and strength of the cholera outbreak in a small town with just a few dozen inhabitants, Piarroux and his team concluded.

The report also analyses the manner of propagation of the disease, noting that wastewater from the Nepalese encampment drained into the same river from which the town's residents draw their water for household use.

That watercourse also facilitated the wider spread of the epidemic, which so far has infected more than 90,000 people in Haiti, a country still struggling to recover from the Jan 12 earthquake that killed more than 200,000 people and left a million homeless.

Read more: UN troops brought cholera to Haiti: Report - The Times of India (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/rest-of-world/UN-troops-brought-cholera-to-Haiti-Report/articleshow/7063975.cms#ixzz1BCX9VoPy) http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/rest-of-world/UN-troops-brought-cholera-to-Haiti-Report/articleshow/7063975.cms#ixzz1BCX9VoPy


I'll come back to the issue of troops later.

Count Bobulescu
16-01-2011, 11:19 PM
I confess, I was completely unaware that there even was a controversy. Issue has not gotten much coverage here. Fears of an outbreak were high to begin with. I thought it had just occurred.
However, when I Googled “Did Nepalese Troops Introduce Cholera to Haiti” the results were mixed. Most results were just reporting on the claim. The best and newest, Dec-14 result I found is below. It is a UCLA Dept. of Epidemiology comment on the issue. It notes the French report, discusses the Nepalese denial and UN agreement, and suggests further work to be done to clarify the issue. At this point, I think it is a fair statement to say that the matter is not yet settled. But as a skeptic of officialdom I’d have to concede it’s possible. Elsewhere I read that although Cholera is endemic in Nepal, no member of the military has been infected in the last eighteen months.


http://www.ph.ucla.edu/epi/snow/cholera_haiti_newdev10.html

One other thing, I included a minor deliberate error in my post @ 59 to see if anyone would call me on it. I’ll fess up now before I get into more trouble. I stated that the closest airport to Port au Prince was a ten hour drive away in San Juan Puerto Rico. P.R. is a sort or devolved US possession. Those born there are entitled to US citizenship but do not pay taxes to the Feds while resident there. Haiti shares the Island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic whose capital is Santo Domingo, and is a ten hour drive from Port au Prince. P.R. is just to the east of Hispaniola. Back next weekend.

C. Flower
17-01-2011, 12:20 AM
I confess, I was completely unaware that there even was a controversy. Issue has not gotten much coverage here. Fears of an outbreak were high to begin with. I thought it had just occurred.
However, when I Googled “Did Nepalese Troops Introduce Cholera to Haiti” the results were mixed. Most results were just reporting on the claim. The best and newest, Dec-14 result I found is below. It is a UCLA Dept. of Epidemiology comment on the issue. It notes the French report, discusses the Nepalese denial and UN agreement, and suggests further work to be done to clarify the issue. At this point, I think it is a fair statement to say that the matter is not yet settled. But as a skeptic of officialdom I’d have to concede it’s possible. Elsewhere I read that although Cholera is endemic in Nepal, no member of the military has been infected in the last eighteen months.


http://www.ph.ucla.edu/epi/snow/cholera_haiti_newdev10.html

One other thing, I included a minor deliberate error in my post @ 59 to see if anyone would call me on it. I’ll fess up now before I get into more trouble. I stated that the closest airport to Port au Prince was a ten hour drive away in San Juan Puerto Rico. P.R. is a sort or devolved US possession. Those born there are entitled to US citizenship but do not pay taxes to the Feds while resident there. Haiti shares the Island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic whose capital is Santo Domingo, and is a ten hour drive from Port au Prince. P.R. is just to the east of Hispaniola. Back next weekend.

The first people to draw attention to this were Haitians who demonstrated to protest about the arrival of cholera via the UN troops. There was no cholera in Haiti until this epidemic arrived. It's a horrendous infection that can kill people within hours of onset.

I missed your airport reference. I remember watching television coverage of the airport - one thing the US did, I recall, was reinstate aircraft landing controls as the control tower was down.

There was an obsession in the media with issues of public order, with people salvaging foodstuffs from the wreckage being labelled as looters and so on.
People needed food and shelter, not thousands of armed men.

You could say the issues are similar to the ones that have arisen in New Orleans, since Hurricane Katrina, but on a far bigger and more extreme scale.

C. Flower
29-01-2011, 08:23 PM
Watching a programe on Denis O'Brien's Market reconstruction project in Haiti - interesting enough. (BBC2)

Count Bobulescu
30-01-2011, 04:09 AM
CF, didn’t see your response until today. Since I had heard no discussion of this topic until I saw it on this board, I was curious about the origin of the Thread Title. Googled it and found the link below, which you had already referenced upthread.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=17000

Looked up the author. Not exactly an entirely objective character.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Chossudovsky

In my short time here, what I’ve thought this board “desperately” “desperately” needs, is a damn good UFO thread. I’m sure Chossudovsky would approve.

On the military issue, I’m sure the O man, was concerned that he not be seen to repeat the Katrina fiasco, (although he was under no obligation), and, as a result there may have been some overreaching by US military. But in general, I still say that the effect of US military presence on the Haitian people in 2010 was 105% positive and 10% negative. US mil fixed the port and airport, to allow multi-national and private donations to get to those in distress, and then within a month or two stepped back. Remember, the Haitian Government had for all practical purposes disappeared. If you can identify for me, one other organization that could have done what US mil did, in the time they did it, and explain to me why that organization sat on it’s hands, I’ll eat my hat.

C. Flower
01-02-2011, 01:31 PM
CF, didn’t see your response until today. Since I had heard no discussion of this topic until I saw it on this board, I was curious about the origin of the Thread Title. Googled it and found the link below, which you had already referenced upthread.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=17000

Looked up the author. Not exactly an entirely objective character.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Chossudovsky

In my short time here, what I’ve thought this board “desperately” “desperately” needs, is a damn good UFO thread. I’m sure Chossudovsky would approve.

On the military issue, I’m sure the O man, was concerned that he not be seen to repeat the Katrina fiasco, (although he was under no obligation), and, as a result there may have been some overreaching by US military. But in general, I still say that the effect of US military presence on the Haitian people in 2010 was 105% positive and 10% negative. US mil fixed the port and airport, to allow multi-national and private donations to get to those in distress, and then within a month or two stepped back. Remember, the Haitian Government had for all practical purposes disappeared. If you can identify for me, one other organization that could have done what US mil did, in the time they did it, and explain to me why that organization sat on it’s hands, I’ll eat my hat.

Virtually no rebuilding has taken place and the number of forces that were allocated to Haiti within days of the earthquake (more than 10,000) was the same as previously identified as needed for an invasion. There was no significant unrest in Haiti. This is all detailed, not relying on the source that the OP poster quoted, in the early part of this thread. Would you like to take a stab at the number of times the US has invaded Haiti? On none of those occasions did they rely on UFOs.

Interesting news :)

Aristide has been told that he can return to Haiti -


Ready to return
Aristide, who was Haiti's first democratically elected leader, said earlier this month he was ready to return to his homeland "today, tomorrow, at any time".
Aristide is a former priest and liberation theologist who rose to become Haiti's first democratically elected president. He was overthrown in a coup, restored to power, then ousted again in 2004. His return was forced by the threat of a US military invasion; debate has raged for years over what role the US played in his departures.
Major western aid donors to Haiti like the United States have been wary about his possible return to the poor, earthquake-battered and volatile Caribbean nation.
He remains very popular at home and some fear he could mobilize supporters who could disrupt an already confused ongoing presidential and legislative elections process.
Haiti is embroiled in a deepening political crisis over flawed November presidential elections, which international monitors concluded were tainted by fraud and irregularities.
Aristide's Fanmi Lavalas party was banned from taking part in the November elections.
Aristide's plans to return home follows the controversial return to Haiti on January 16 of former dictator Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier. Duvalier, 59, now faces charges in Haiti of corruption, theft and crimes against humanity

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/americas/2011/02/2011217025580425.html

Count Bobulescu
02-03-2011, 05:46 AM
There already is a thread on US Aid/Military Intervention in Haiti, which I gave up on, because of exactly the same issues. I’ll post one relevant message here, and cross post it in the Haiti thread, and then can we please refocus on Africa here.

http://www.med.navy.mil/sites/usnscomfort/Pages/OperationUnifiedResponseHaiti.aspx

http://www.med.navy.mil/sites/usnscomfort/Pages/default.aspx

C. Flower
18-03-2011, 01:32 AM
Aristide on his way back from Haiti from South Africa tonight. It's expected there will be a good welcome for him.

Kid Ryder
18-03-2011, 01:40 AM
Aristide on his way back from Haiti from South Africa tonight. It's expected there will be a good welcome for him.

And a pretty hostile one from the Empire too, no doubt. Remember that he was deported from his own country by Empire-backed golpistas -


Aristide has accused the US of deposing him. According to Rep. Maxine Waters D-California, Mildred Aristide called her at her home at 6:30 am to inform her "the coup d'etat has been completed", and Jean-Bertrand Aristide said the US Embassy in Haiti's chief of staff came to his house to say he would be killed "and a lot of Haitians would be killed" if he refused to resign immediately and said he "has to go now." Rep. Charles Rangel, D-New York expressed similar words, saying Aristide had told him he was "disappointed that the international community had let him down" and "that he resigned under pressure" – "As a matter of fact, he was very apprehensive for his life. They made it clear that he had to go now or he would be killed." When asked for his response to these statements Colin Powell said that "it might have been better for members of Congress who have heard these stories to ask us about the stories before going public with them so we don't make a difficult situation that much more difficult" and he alleged that Aristide "did not democratically govern or govern well".

Jean-Bertrand Aristide - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Bertrand_Aristide)

C. Flower
18-03-2011, 10:37 PM
And a pretty hostile one from the Empire too, no doubt. Remember that he was deported from his own country by Empire-backed golpistas -

Jean-Bertrand Aristide - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Bertrand_Aristide)


There's an interview with Aristide here - the best thing I've read in terms of explaining his political / liberation theology outlook.

He talks about the compromises he made, politically, the US coup that ended his government, and the history and development of Haiti generally.

Recommended -

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v29/n04/peter-hallward/an-interview-with-jean-bertrand-aristide

He arrived back to a big welcome, today.

C. Flower
21-04-2011, 08:38 AM
Someone described as a 50 year old pop singer has won the Haitian elections.

He has taken a big job on as there has been very little reconstruction since the earthquake and tornadoes last year.


Officials have published final results that show a popular singer won Haiti’s presidential elections.

The announcement confirms that Michel “Sweet Micky” Martelly won the run-off for the election with 67.57% of the vote.

When preliminary results released on April 4 showed he defeated his rival in the March 20 run-off, opponent Mirlande Manigat said she would not contest.

The 50-year-old Mr Martelly begins his term on May 14. He will be in charge of leading reconstruction efforts in Haiti, which was devastated by an earthquake last year.

Read more: http://www.breakingnews.ie/world/pop-singer-confirmed-as-haiti-poll-winner-502164.html#ixzz1K8njM4HZ

C. Flower
14-05-2011, 09:45 PM
The people of Haiti spent centuries paying France compensation for the value of their own bodies and their children, after they liberated themselves from slavery.

From human slavery, to debt slavery. They are still paying off the IMF, whose delegation is headed by a French woman. 650,000 people are living under plastic still, after last year's earthquake.

http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2011/cr11106.pdf

C. Flower
06-09-2011, 08:43 AM
Demonstrations in Haiti over an alleged sexual assault on a young man by Uruguayan troops. The Haitians never stop protesting against what is being done to them, even when they are in the most dire situation, and seem to have indomitable capacity for resistance.

http://www.breakingnews.ie/world/peacekeepers-in-haiti-sex-assault-probe-519363.html


Several hundred Haitians demonstrated in support of an 18-year-old man who said he was sexually assaulted by peacekeepers from Uruguay on a UN base along the southern coast of Haiti.

The alleged attack occurred on July 20 but only became public last week when a video taken by mobile phone was circulated and the United Nations announced an investigation.

The Uruguayan military has called the incident a prank that got out of hand and said a preliminary UN investigation shows no evidence of rape.

Haitian president Michel Martelly “vigorously condemned” the alleged assault in the town of Port-Salut, saying in a statement that it was an “act that revolts the national conscience”.

Protesters in Port-Salut called for reparations over the alleged assault, which threatened to worsen the reputation of the UN in Haiti.

Many Haitians view the world body as an occupying force and are still angry over a cholera outbreak that was inadvertently brought to the country by peacekeepers from Nepal last year.

In a statement on Sunday, the Uruguayan defence ministry said a UN preliminary investigation had found that the men did not sexually abuse the Haitian teen but that they committed misconduct by allowing a civilian into their barracks and could face severe penalties.

The video of the encounter is clearly sexual in nature. However, a UN spokeswoman in Haiti, Eliane Nabaa, said the UN had not come to any conclusions.

Dr Clifford Gauthier, a physician who examined the young man a month after the alleged attack, said he found evidence that was consistent with signs of sexual abuse even five weeks after the attack.

Read more: http://www.breakingnews.ie/world/peacekeepers-in-haiti-sex-assault-probe-519363.html#ixzz1X9juW6ii

C. Flower
11-01-2012, 06:47 PM
Haitians are demonstrating against the private landownership that is preventing rebuilding of their city - RTE news reported tonight.

If they didn't have the US army sitting on top of them, they could do a compulsory purchase or requisition it.

Count Bobulescu
13-01-2012, 07:59 PM
Haitians are demonstrating against the private landownership that is preventing rebuilding of their city - RTE news reported tonight.

If they didn't have the US army sitting on top of them, they could do a compulsory purchase or requisition it.
CF, I'm at a complete loss to understand why you appear to be fixated on the idea that there are still US troops occupying Haiti. Here's a Guardian article noting the drawdown from 20,000 in January 2010 to 4,000 onshore, and 4,000 offshore in March 2010. I'm unsure when the last troops left, but I believe it to be June 2010.
As of September 2011 there were fewer than 50 US troops in Haiti

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/mar/08/us-troops-withdraw-haiti-earthquake
"

I would like for [US troops] to stay in Haiti until they rebuild the country and everybody can go back to their house," Marjorie Louis, 27, a mother in a makeshift camp at the national stadium, told Associated Press.
Another family sheltering under a tarpaulin at another camp agreed. "They should stay because they have been doing a good job," Lesly Pierre, 35, said. "If it was up to our government, we wouldn't have gotten any help at all."

However some aid agencies, notably Médecins sans Frontières, complained that military flights hogged the airport (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jan/17/us-accused-aid-effort-haiti) and diverted civilian aid aircraft to the neighbouring Dominican Republic. French and Italian officials said the US intervention was clumsy and overweening.

Leftist leaders such as Venezuela's Hugo Chávez and Cuba's Fidel Castro accused the US of conducting an imperial occupation under a humanitarian banner.
The following are countries, listed by region, in which U.S. military personnel are deployed. The most current numbers are based on United States Department of Defense (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Department_of_Defense) statistics from September 2011.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_deployments#cite_note-siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil-0) These numbers do not include any military or civilian contractors, nor dependents. Countries with fewer than 50 U.S. personnel deployed are omitted.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_deployments


Western Hemisphere



Brazil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazil) - 54[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_deployments#cite_note-siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil-0)
Canada (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada) - 130[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_deployments#cite_note-siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil-0)
Colombia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colombia) - 63[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_deployments#cite_note-siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil-0)
Greenland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenland) - 142[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_deployments#cite_note-siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil-0)
Guantanamo Bay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guantanamo_Bay_Naval_Base), Cuba (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuba) – 929[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_deployments#cite_note-siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil-0)
Honduras (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honduras) - 354[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_deployments#cite_note-siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil-0)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti

Force commanders of the MINUSTAH military component:


Brigadier General Luiz Guilherme Paul Cruz (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Luiz_Guilherme_Paul_Cruz&action=edit&redlink=1), Brazil, March 2010 to Present.


Countries contributing military personnel (7,039 in all):
Argentina (558 including a field hospital (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentine_Air_Force_Mobile_Field_Hospital) ), Bolivia (208), Brazil (2,200), Canada (10), Chile (499), Croatia (3), Ecuador (67), France (2), Guatemala (118), Jordan (728), Nepal (1,075), Paraguay (31), Peru (209), the Philippines (157), Sri Lanka (959), United States (4), and Uruguay (1,135).[ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unfacts-61)
62] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unfacts-61)[63] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unmissions09-62)
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unmissions09-62)

Countries contributing police/civilian personnel (2,031 in all):
Israel (14), Benin (32), Brazil (4), Burkina Faso (26), Cameroon (8), Canada (94), Central African Republic (7), Chad (3), Chile (15), China (143), Colombia (37).[62] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unfacts-61)[63] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unmissions09-62) Côte D'Ivoire (60), DR Congo (2), Egypt (22), El Salvador (7), France (64), Grenada (3), Guinea (55), India (139), Italy (4), Jamaica (5), Jordan (312), Madagascar (2), Mali (55), Nepal (168), Niger (62), Nigeria (128), Pakistan (248), Philippines (18), Romania (23), Russian Federation (10), Rwanda (14), Senegal (131), Serbia (5), Spain (41), Sri Lanka (7), Togo (5), Turkey (46), United States (48), Uruguay (7), and Yemen (1).[62] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unfacts-61)[63 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unmissions09-62)
] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unmissions09-62) More importantly, here’s a good piece that looks at Haiti two years on. It’s in four parts. Part one is the longest and best, it looks at what happened to the aid money pledged.

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/americas/haiti/120110/haiti-earthquake-aid-rice

C. Flower
13-01-2012, 08:09 PM
CF, I'm at a complete loss to understand why you appear to be fixated on the idea that there are still US troops occupying Haiti. Here's a Guardian article noting the drawdown from 20,000 in January 2010 to 4,000 onshore, and 4,000 offshore in March 2010. I'm unsure when the last troops left, but I believe it to be June 2010.
As of September 2011 there were fewer than 50 US troops in Haiti

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/mar/08/us-troops-withdraw-haiti-earthquake
" The following are countries, listed by region, in which U.S. military personnel are deployed. The most current numbers are based on United States Department of Defense (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Department_of_Defense) statistics from September 2011.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_deployments#cite_note-siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil-0) These numbers do not include any military or civilian contractors, nor dependents. Countries with fewer than 50 U.S. personnel deployed are omitted.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_military_deployments

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti

Force commanders of the MINUSTAH military component:


Brigadier General Luiz Guilherme Paul Cruz (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Luiz_Guilherme_Paul_Cruz&action=edit&redlink=1), Brazil, March 2010 to Present.

62] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unfacts-61)[63] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unmissions09-62)
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unmissions09-62)
] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Stabilisation_Mission_in_Haiti#cite _note-unmissions09-62) More importantly, here’s a good piece that looks at Haiti two years on. It’s in four parts. Part one is the longest and best, it looks at what happened to the aid money pledged.

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/americas/haiti/120110/haiti-earthquake-aid-rice

Thanks for the updates. February 2010, there were 22,000 US troops in Haiti, most of them on ships. It only took the US a few days to move thousands of troops to Haiti after the earthquake. The US has been either openly in occupation of Haiti, or else backing a local dictator, for most of the last 100 years. The reality is that the US is ready to stamp all over Haiti at the drop of a hat.

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/americas/US-Military-Relief-Operation-in-Haiti-to-End-Overall-Effort-will-Continue-91549324.html

Count Bobulescu
13-01-2012, 10:41 PM
Thanks for the updates. February 2010, there were 22,000 US troops in Haiti, most of them on ships. It only took the US a few days to move thousands of troops to Haiti after the earthquake. The US has been either openly in occupation of Haiti, or else backing a local dictator, for most of the last 100 years. The reality is that the US is ready to stamp all over Haiti at the drop of a hat.

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/americas/US-Military-Relief-Operation-in-Haiti-to-End-Overall-Effort-will-Continue-91549324.html

No dispute with you that US history with Haiti is imperfect, but it is not as if Haiti the poorest country in the western hemisphere (thanks to France) is a “threat” to the US.
Would you have preferred if the US had not sent the military to provide aid in a situation where 220,000 had been killed and millions more at risk?
From the VOA link you provided which is dated. April 19, 2010.

Now the ships are gone and just 2,200 troops remain on land. They are helping move quake refugees to safer locations and providing other logistical help to Haitian and international relief efforts for the current rainy season and the approaching hurricane season.

But Keen says as those troops leave by June 1st, and the formal relief operation ends, 500 U.S. reserve forces will move in to conduct more normal types of military exchanges with Haiti, including training medical personnel, building schools and clinics, and helping Haiti establish an emergency operations center and planning process

Count Bobulescu
19-01-2012, 03:53 PM
“Baby Doc” on the up and up in Haiti.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/americas/in-haiti-the-former-dictator-duvalier-thrives/2012/01/13/gIQAaYbM6P_story.html?hpid=z5

Count Bobulescu
13-10-2012, 10:54 PM
Another Haitian conmam. Small potatoes in the overall context, but illustrative of the larger problem.


Wyclef Jean told us to trust him to help Haitians after the massive earthquake in 2010. People did, first giving his Yéle $1 million in 24 hours and $16 million altogether. Now the charity is defunct and that money appears to have gone everywhere except to the victims who needed it. "[A]n examination of the charity indicates that millions in donations for earthquake victims went to its own offices, salaries, consultants’ fees and travel, to Mr. Jean’s brother-in-law for projects never realized ..." reports The New York Times's Deborah Sontag, in a scathing, follow-up report on the charity's activities.

More specifically, Sontag writes:
In 2010, Yéle spent $9 million and half went to travel, to salaries and consultants’ fees and to expenses related to their offices and warehouse. In contrast, another celebrity charity, Sean Penn’s J/P Haitian Relief Organization, spent $13 million with only 10 percent going to those costs
.
That's $4.5 million right off the bat that Haitians were never going to see. The rest was spent even more shadily—like paying Jean's brother-in-law:
There were questionable contracts, too: Mr. Jean’s brother-in-law, Eric Warnel Pierre, collected about $630,000 for three projects including the medical center and the plaza — what Yéle’s tax forms called “the rebuilding of Haiti." Mr. Pierre did not respond to messages left for him.

Sontag's report also lists off things like spending nearly $100,000 on temporary homes that were never built, a $230,000 plaza revitalization effort that was never seen, and a $146,000 for a future medical center that still only exists in imagination. And perhaps we should have known better.

The quake hit on January 12, 2010. Two days later, on January 14, the Christian Science Monitor's David Grant reported that Jean had already raised some $400,000 via text message. And Grant had reported that emergency relief experts and groups were warning us that Yéle shouldn't be our first choice for donations.

Eight days later, Jean had already raised more than $2 million for Yéle and some homework on the organization's expenses was being done on Yéle. Tax returns showed that money from the organization from 2005 on went to things like a $31,000 payment to a recording studio. And we were already asking ourselves and Wyclef if he ever spent the money on himself. Jean, in between bouts of tears, told reporters at the time, "The fact that these attacks come as we are mobilized to meet the greatest human tragedy in the history of Haiti only serves to perplex me even further." Jean had a chance, now wasted to prove his critics wrong.http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/12/world/americas/quake-hit-haiti-gains-little-as-wyclef-jean-charity-spends-much.html?ref=world&pagewanted=all&_r=0

C. Flower
03-01-2013, 07:50 PM
Haiti aid problems...

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/02/opinion/haitis-long-road.html?ref=opinion&_r=0

C. Flower
12-01-2013, 03:36 PM
Three years today.

Count Bobulescu
03-03-2013, 09:47 PM
Haiti aid problems...

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/02/opinion/haitis-long-road.html?ref=opinion&_r=0

More in the same vein.


After a devastating earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, governments and foundations from around the world pledged more than $9 billion to help get the country back on its feet.
Only a fraction of the money ever made it. And Haiti's President Michel Martelly says the funds aren't "showing results."

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/02/28/172875646/what-happened-to-the-aid-meant-to-rebuild-haiti?ft=3&f=1001&sc=nl&cc=nh-20130228

Dojo
03-03-2013, 10:36 PM
What a stupid thread title.

C. Flower
03-03-2013, 11:06 PM
What a stupid thread title.

The US implemented its 2004 invasion plan and turned medical teams away so they could land troops.



Louisiana became the 18th of the United States back in 1812, but you'd never have known it watching the Federal government's ham-fisted response to 2005's Hurricane Katrina. The Obama Administration is doing things differently: Haiti, for all intents and purposes, became the 51st state at 4:53 p.m. Tuesday in the wake of its deadly earthquake. If not a state, then at least a ward of the state - the United States - as Washington mobilized national resources to rush urgent aid to Haiti's stricken people. "Our nation has a unique capacity to reach out quickly and broadly and to deliver assistance that can save lives," President Obama said Friday. "That responsibility obviously is magnified when the devastation that's been suffered is so near to us." (See how to help the Haiti victims.)

Obama has already dispatched a senior member of his national security team, Deputy National Security Adviser Denis McDonough, to the scene. An armada of U.S. warships is steaming toward Haiti, to be joined by at least one Coast Guard cutter en route from the Pacific via the Panama Canal - and manned and unmanned aircraft. Within two hours of the quake, one of the globe's biggest warships, the carrier USS Carl Vinson, was ordered from off the Virginia coast toward Haiti, swapping its jet fighters for heavy-lift helicopters as it steamed south at top speed. Three ships, including the Vinson and the hospital ship USNS Comfort, boast state-of-the-art medical facilities that will care for injured Haitians. Thousands of troops are on their way to Haiti or already there, running the airport and clearing ports for many more to follow. Up to 10,000 troops will be in Haiti or floating just offshore by Monday. 


Count Bobulescu
03-03-2013, 11:10 PM
What a stupid thread title.

I believe I expressed similar sentiments up thread.

Count Bobulescu
03-03-2013, 11:16 PM
The US implemented its 2004 invasion plan and turned medical teams away so they could land troops.
You just have your sequence backwards.
The situation was so chaotic because aid was arriving so quickly by air that some of it had to be diverted to other airports. Remember the US troops had to be landed firs,t so that they could reopen the port and airport to allow aid to land.

C. Flower
03-03-2013, 11:16 PM
I believe I expressed similar sentiments up thread.

But yet this invasion of thousands of troops, according to your last post, had very little impact on humanitarian needs.

Dojo
03-03-2013, 11:29 PM
The US implemented its 2004 invasion plan and turned medical teams away so they could land troops.

A link to the source would be nice. Also have you no concept of the need for security in a devastated area? Jaysus, anything to smear the US and the west. This site is like the RT newsroom FFS! :confused:

Dojo
03-03-2013, 11:30 PM
I believe I expressed similar sentiments up thread.

Not going to read through what was likely regurgitated, anti western bollox!

C. Flower
03-03-2013, 11:47 PM
A link to the source would be nice. Also have you no concept of the need for security in a devastated area? Jaysus, anything to smear the US and the west. This site is like the RT newsroom FFS! :confused:

There are plenty of links, and if you had any real interest in the thread title, or in Haiti, you would have read them.

Count Bobulescu
03-03-2013, 11:50 PM
The US implemented its 2004 invasion plan and turned medical teams away so they could land troops.

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti – A major obstacle to delivering aid to Haiti began to be cleared Friday, as the U.S. Air Force brought order to the chaotic Port-au-Prince airport.
In another sign of progress, the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson took up position off Haiti's coast and began to fly water and other badly needed supplies to land. Despite these and other advances, hundreds of thousands of Haitians remain stranded in dire conditions.

Earlier, authorities had been forced to turn away aid flights when the large influx of aircraft overwhelmed the facility's small tarmac. But by daybreak, a 115-person Air Force team, which flew in five C-17 cargo planes of communications and air-traffic management equipment overnight, had undone most of the logjam. A steady stream of flights arrived and departed without difficulty even during the pre-dawn hours, the first time the airport was able to accept nighttime flights since the quake.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703657604575004913901168380.html

C. Flower
03-03-2013, 11:55 PM
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703657604575004913901168380.html

The US turned away European and Cuban medical teams.

I expect that you are very well aware of the number of times the US has invaded Haiti in the last 100 years.

There was nothing unusual about it.

Dojo
03-03-2013, 11:59 PM
There are plenty of links, and if you had any real interest in the thread title, or in Haiti, you would have read them.

The fact you would equate establishing security in a devastated earthquake zone with an "invasion" (lol) really sums up the level of intellect, or lack thereof, in this thread. I suppose the US "invaded" China after the 2008 Sichuan earthquake when they sent USAF C-17's to assist in the recovery efforts? FFS, catch a grip!

Dojo
04-03-2013, 12:00 AM
The US turned away European and Cuban medical teams.

I expect that you are very well aware of the number of times the US has invaded Haiti in the last 100 years.

There was nothing unusual about it.

You're losing it. :confused:

C. Flower
04-03-2013, 12:01 AM
You're losing it. :confused:

You might try reading the thread, or producing some information to back up what you are posting about Haiti.

C. Flower
04-03-2013, 12:03 AM
The fact you would equate establishing security in a devastated earthquake zone with an "invasion" (lol) really sums up the level of intellect, or lack thereof, in this thread. I suppose the US "invaded" China after the 2008 Sichuan earthquake when they sent USAF C-17's to assist in the recovery efforts? FFS, catch a grip!

What was the "security" issue that required thousands of troops ?

Dojo
04-03-2013, 12:11 AM
What was the "security" issue that required thousands of troops ?

A complete collapse of the civil administration of the Haitian state. You know, like when the Japanese government deployed the JSDF to devastated areas after the 2011 Tohoku tsunami? The military is usually the first to be called to assist with recovery but to also ensure security is maintained in the face of possible rioting, looting and a Hurricane Katrina type situation. You're a smart guy, this should be fairly obvious, right? :confused:

Count Bobulescu
04-03-2013, 12:13 AM
There may have been Cubans and Europeans among those initially turned away, but it is certainly not the case that all Cubans and Europeans were turned away.
This, from a self described progressive outlet

Among the many donor nations helping Haiti, Cuba and its medical teams have played a major role in treating earthquake victims.
Public health experts say the Cubans were the first to set up medical facilities among the debris and to revamp hospitals immediately after the earthquake struck.
However, their pivotal work in the health sector has received scant media coverage.

https://www.commondreams.org/headline/2010/02/15-9

C. Flower
04-03-2013, 12:20 AM
There may have been Cubans and Europeans among those initially turned away, but it is certainly not the case that all Cubans and Europeans were turned away.
This, from a self described progressive outlet

https://www.commondreams.org/headline/2010/02/15-9

Yes. To the best of my memory there were Cuban doctors on the ground before the US went in, and their work was covered in depth on Irish television.

Count Bobulescu
04-03-2013, 12:26 AM
Yes. To the best of my memory there were Cuban doctors on the ground before the US went in, and their work was covered in depth on Irish television.
So why are you claiming that the US turned away Cuban and European medical aid?

random new yorker
04-03-2013, 12:47 AM
So why are you claiming that the US turned away Cuban and European medical aid?

is Haiti one of our territories now?

Dojo
04-03-2013, 12:53 AM
is Haiti one of our territories now?

Apparently so. Sneaky rascals! :eek:

random new yorker
04-03-2013, 12:56 AM
Apparently so. Sneaky rascals! :eek:

:)

C. Flower
04-03-2013, 07:16 AM
So why are you claiming that the US turned away Cuban and European medical aid?

Sequence of events in the first weeks

1. Earthquake
2. Cuban doctors arrived
3. US military/navy arrived
4. New medical teams turned away.

Here is a report referring to a Medecins Sans Frontieres team and portable hospital being refused landing by the US.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jan/17/haiti-quake-injured-hospitals

In Haiti after the earthquake there was urgent need for expert rescue teams, for emergency water supplies and medical supplies for people with injuries.

Thousands of soldiers without that expertise were of no possible relevance. It was an opportunistic move by the US who had had the invasion plan on the books since the mid 2000s.

The subsequent performance has been dire, as you know. As after Hurricane Katrina, getting the population locked down was the priority. The UN capped it all by bringing in Typhoid to a country that had never had any, and that is now killing thousands.

The biggest failing has been the failure to deal with the land issues. A handful of private land owners are sitting on the only land suitable for new construction, and the old city is in small ownership plots obliterated by the earthquake. Meanwhile people are still living under plastic and canvas.

Any proper government, left to govern itself, would by now have compulsorily purchased all of the land at reasonable price, drawn up a plan, and put in infrastructure, and divided the land up into plots so that people could rebuild.

random new yorker
04-03-2013, 05:59 PM
Sequence of events in the first weeks

1. Earthquake
2. Cuban doctors arrived
3. US military/navy arrived
4. New medical teams turned away.

Here is a report referring to a Medecins Sans Frontieres team and portable hospital being refused landing by the US.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jan/17/haiti-quake-injured-hospitals

In Haiti after the earthquake there was urgent need for expert rescue teams, for emergency water supplies and medical supplies for people with injuries.

Thousands of soldiers without that expertise were of no possible relevance. It was an opportunistic move by the US who had had the invasion plan on the books since the mid 2000s.

The subsequent performance has been dire, as you know. As after Hurricane Katrina, getting the population locked down was the priority. The UN capped it all by bringing in Typhoid to a country that had never had any, and that is now killing thousands.

The biggest failing has been the failure to deal with the land issues. A handful of private land owners are sitting on the only land suitable for new construction, and the old city is in small ownership plots obliterated by the earthquake. Meanwhile people are still living under plastic and canvas.

Any proper government, left to govern itself, would by now have compulsorily purchased all of the land at reasonable price, drawn up a plan, and put in infrastructure, and divided the land up into plots so that people could rebuild.


..would you please find us a good explanation as to WHY we (the US) would WANT to keep Haiti under our governance??

Dojo
04-03-2013, 09:27 PM
..would you please find us a good explanation as to WHY we (the US) would WANT to keep Haiti under our governance??

Training ground for US Marines for the looming zombie apocalypse?!? :eek: :eek: :eek:

Dojo
04-03-2013, 09:30 PM
Sequence of events in the first weeks

1. Earthquake
2. Cuban doctors arrived
3. US military/navy arrived
4. New medical teams turned away.

Here is a report referring to a Medecins Sans Frontieres team and portable hospital being refused landing by the US.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jan/17/haiti-quake-injured-hospitals

In Haiti after the earthquake there was urgent need for expert rescue teams, for emergency water supplies and medical supplies for people with injuries.

Thousands of soldiers without that expertise were of no possible relevance. It was an opportunistic move by the US who had had the invasion plan on the books since the mid 2000s.

The subsequent performance has been dire, as you know. As after Hurricane Katrina, getting the population locked down was the priority. The UN capped it all by bringing in Typhoid to a country that had never had any, and that is now killing thousands.

The biggest failing has been the failure to deal with the land issues. A handful of private land owners are sitting on the only land suitable for new construction, and the old city is in small ownership plots obliterated by the earthquake. Meanwhile people are still living under plastic and canvas.

Any proper government, left to govern itself, would by now have compulsorily purchased all of the land at reasonable price, drawn up a plan, and put in infrastructure, and divided the land up into plots so that people could rebuild.

Yup, it's all a vast conspiracy linking the usually hostile UN and US with each other in the aim of dominating a tiny country, with little wealth, but an over-abundance of voodoo priests and satan worshipping. :rolleyes:

PaddyJoe
04-03-2013, 09:47 PM
..would you please find us a good explanation as to WHY we (the US) would WANT to keep Haiti under our governance??

Follow the money;)

Wiikileaks: Disaster capitalism and the Haiti earthquake
http://www.politicalworld.org/showthread.php?p=285638


For instance:

Contractors for Fruit of the Loom, Hanes and Levi’s worked in close concert with the US Embassy when they aggressively moved to block a minimum wage increase for Haitian assembly zone workers, the lowest-paid in the hemisphere, according to secret State Department cables.
The factory owners told the Haitian Parliament that they were willing to give workers a 9-cents-per-hour pay increase to 31 cents per hour to make T-shirts, bras and underwear for US clothing giants like Dockers and Nautica.

But the factory owners refused to pay 62 cents per hour, or $5 per day, as a measure unanimously passed by the Haitian Parliament in June 2009 would have mandated. And they had the vigorous backing of the US Agency for International Development and the US Embassy when they took that stand.

Dojo
04-03-2013, 09:51 PM
Follow the money;)

http://www.politicalworld.org/showthread.php?p=285638


For instance:

Sounds like the Haitian equivalent of Croke Park public sector negotiations. How exactly does that equate to the US invading Haiti? :confused:

PaddyJoe
04-03-2013, 09:57 PM
Sounds like the Haitian equivalent of Croke Park public sector negotiations. How exactly does that equate to the US invading Haiti? :confused:

I was responding to the question from random new yorker as to why the US would want to keep Haiti under close control.
As so often in these cases it's closely linked to corporate interests.

C. Flower
04-03-2013, 10:53 PM
..would you please find us a good explanation as to WHY we (the US) would WANT to keep Haiti under our governance??

Continuance of past practice ? Haiti has been subject to repeated US invasions and occupations, and a number of democratically elected Haitian leaders have been deposed in favour of US puppets.

Haiti has been stripped of natural resources in the process, but the main strategic value to the US of occupying Haiti is ensuring that no one else occupies it, and that it does not adopt a non-compliant independence, like Cuba.

http://latinamericanhistory.about.com/od/historyofthecaribbean/p/08haiti1915.htm

http://www.iacenter.org/haiti/object.htm

http://www.thirdworldtraveler.com/Haiti/Haiti_Coup_Made_US.html

http://www.cja.org/article.php?list=type&type=250

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8460185.stm

random new yorker
04-03-2013, 11:16 PM
Follow the money;)

http://www.politicalworld.org/showthread.php?p=285638


For instance:

cough....gagging here..you sure you want me to read that??


OOOO' please give me a break here....what money? you think we're looking for money in Haiti...oh boy ...keeping their miserable wages low for our bananas.

random new yorker
04-03-2013, 11:18 PM
Training ground for US Marines for the looming zombie apocalypse?!? :eek: :eek: :eek:

dont we have Guam for that??

what to do w Haiti??? too many people there to practice dropping bombs :)

PaddyJoe
04-03-2013, 11:29 PM
cough....gagging here..you sure you want me to read that??


OOOO' please give me a break here....what money? you think we're looking for money in Haiti...oh boy ...keeping their miserable wages low for our bananas.

I don't mind whether you read it not. But to be fair you asked a question and I'm trying to provide part of the answer.
Walmart, to single out just one US corporate, has a direct vested interest in keeping manufacturing labour rates in Haiti as low as possible.

C. Flower
04-03-2013, 11:30 PM
Whatever you do, don't trouble yourselves by looking at the facts.

random new yorker
04-03-2013, 11:34 PM
I don't mind whether you read it not. But to be fair you asked a question and I'm trying to provide part of the answer.
Walmart, to single out just one US corporate, has a direct vested interest in keeping manufacturing labour rates in Haiti as low as possible.

here's my own spin on this:

"Walmart has a direct vested interest in keeping manufacturing labor rates ALL over the world as low as possible."

now whats so special about Haiti?? are we afraid of have Cuba number two at our door as CF suggests above??

Aye Count... where the hell are ya!!

random new yorker
04-03-2013, 11:35 PM
Whatever you do, don't trouble yourselves by looking at the facts.

WHAT facts??

oh dear and my plane is delayed looks like i have a lot of time for this today

Count Bobulescu
04-03-2013, 11:39 PM
Sequence of events in the first weeks

1. Earthquake
2. Cuban doctors arrived
3. US military/navy arrived
4. New medical teams turned away.

Here is a report referring to a Medecins Sans Frontieres team and portable hospital being refused landing by the US.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jan/17/haiti-quake-injured-hospitals

In Haiti after the earthquake there was urgent need for expert rescue teams, for emergency water supplies and medical supplies for people with injuries.

Thousands of soldiers without that expertise were of no possible relevance. It was an opportunistic move by the US who had had the invasion plan on the books since the mid 2000s.

The subsequent performance has been dire, as you know. As after Hurricane Katrina, getting the population locked down was the priority. The UN capped it all by bringing in Typhoid to a country that had never had any, and that is now killing thousands.

The biggest failing has been the failure to deal with the land issues. A handful of private land owners are sitting on the only land suitable for new construction, and the old city is in small ownership plots obliterated by the earthquake. Meanwhile people are still living under plastic and canvas.

Any proper government, left to govern itself, would by now have compulsorily purchased all of the land at reasonable price, drawn up a plan, and put in infrastructure, and divided the land up into plots so that people could rebuild.

I don’t know what it is you don’t understand about the sequence. The Guardian piece you cite explains without any hint of conspiracy. The first MSFplane was diverted (not turned away) for any one of several reasons, (officially, it apparently didn’t have authorization to land), there was a bottleneck at the airport, etc. Given what was taking place in Haiti at the time I’m fairly sure none of the planes diverted consisted of groups of revelers and all of them consisted of humanitarian aid.

If you look at the date and time stamps on the Guardian and WSJ pieces guardian.co.uk, Sunday 17 January 2010 13.36 EST, and the WSJ January 15, 2010, 6:00 p.m. ET. There is only about thirty six hours separating them. The Guardian piece makes clear it is referring to events that occurred the previous day, so the time gap between WSJ and Guardian reporting is even less than 36 hours and to the degree that they overlap on content they are broadly in agreement. There really is no controversy here.

From the Guardian piece you cite,


All material from the cargo is now being sent by truck from Samana, but this has added a 24-hour delay. A second MSF plane is on its way and scheduled to land today in Port- au-Prince at around 10am local time (3pm GMT) with additional lifesaving medical material and the rest of the equipment for the hospital.

If this plane is also rerouted the installation of the hospital will be further delayed, in a situation where thousands of wounded are still in need of life-saving treatment, the group said.

The major obstacle remains the bottleneck at the airport, which has turned away a number of vital cargo flights.

As for US plans to invade Haiti.........piffle..............US has plans to invade everywhere. Even has plans to nuke the moon.

random new yorker
04-03-2013, 11:44 PM
As for US plans to invade Haiti.........piffle..............US has plans to invade everywhere. Even has plans to nuke the moon.


but we really wouldn't know what to do with Haiti...... i vote for NO invasion of Haiti!! :D:D:D


now Mars I like that!!


(got a little crazy here today ahn??)

C. Flower
05-03-2013, 12:04 AM
As for US plans to invade Haiti.........piffle..............US has plans to invade everywhere. Even has plans to nuke the moon.

Precisely.

I'm surprised you don't recall the controversy about medical teams being turned away after the arrival of the US military. There are many more reports than the Guardian's. The Wikipedia page on the earthquake is on the rough side, but does record the main events.

10,000 troops were brought in. This inevitably lead to days, at critical stage, in which emergency supplies and rescue were postponed.

http://crossedcrocodiles.wordpress.com/2010/01/20/us-miltary-turning-away-aid-flights-to-haiti/



Port-au-Prince, January 19, 2010 – A Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) cargo plane carrying 12 tons of medical equipment, including drugs, surgical supplies and two dialysis machines, was turned away three times from Port-au-Prince airport since Sunday night despite repeated assurances of its ability to land there. This 12-ton cargo was part of the contents of an earlier plane carrying a total of 40 tons of supplies that was blocked from landing on Sunday morning. Since January 14, MSF has had five planes diverted from the original destination of Port-au-Prince to the Dominican Republic. These planes carried a total of 85 tons of medical and relief supplies.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_Haiti_earthquake

The UN has just told Haiti it will not provide compensation to cholera victims.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/21/un-haiti-cholera-victims-rejects-compensation

random new yorker
05-03-2013, 01:49 AM
Precisely.

I'm surprised you don't recall the controversy about medical teams being turned away after the arrival of the US military. There are many more reports than the Guardian's. The Wikipedia page on the earthquake is on the rough side, but does record the main events.

10,000 troops were brought in. This inevitably lead to days, at critical stage, in which emergency supplies and rescue were postponed.

http://crossedcrocodiles.wordpress.com/2010/01/20/us-miltary-turning-away-aid-flights-to-haiti/ [\quote]


yep I remember the news at the time quite well, quite well, brightly clear in my mind, and also remember it was a massive earthquake that oh these pesky massive earthquakes just have this shattering power to flatten pretty much everything around including the presidential palace, roads aeroport all destroyed and paranoid folks like you thinking we' re NOT letting aid land their planes...

[quote]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_Haiti_earthquake

The UN has just told Haiti it will not provide compensation to cholera victims.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/21/un-haiti-cholera-victims-rejects-compensation

Whats keeping you from putting up the money and going out there and bail them out... how bout you put your deeds where your mouth is...

who funds the UN? any of my money going into this?? how about your money??

Dojo
05-03-2013, 08:31 PM
I don't mind whether you read it not. But to be fair you asked a question and I'm trying to provide part of the answer.
Walmart, to single out just one US corporate, has a direct vested interest in keeping manufacturing labour rates in Haiti as low as possible.

As they do in China, yet I don't see troops from the 101st dropping into Beijing. :rolleyes:

Dojo
05-03-2013, 08:37 PM
Precisely.

I'm surprised you don't recall the controversy about medical teams being turned away after the arrival of the US military. There are many more reports than the Guardian's. The Wikipedia page on the earthquake is on the rough side, but does record the main events.

10,000 troops were brought in. This inevitably lead to days, at critical stage, in which emergency supplies and rescue were postponed.

http://crossedcrocodiles.wordpress.com/2010/01/20/us-miltary-turning-away-aid-flights-to-haiti/



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_Haiti_earthquake

The UN has just told Haiti it will not provide compensation to cholera victims.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/21/un-haiti-cholera-victims-rejects-compensation

Did it ever occur to you that in the midst of such a massive catastrophe many parts of the civilian infrastructure of Haiti, such as air traffic control, would be drastically compromised? If the same thing happened to Dublin do you think landing planes at a severely curtailed Dublin Airport would be so simple? Seriously, there is no conspiracy, but as usual folks here will do there damnedest to see one. :rolleyes:

C. Flower
05-03-2013, 08:58 PM
As they do in China, yet I don't see troops from the 101st dropping into Beijing. :rolleyes:

Seriously, an invasion of China (population over 1.3 billion, nuclear armed) by the US would be a slightly different affair from an invasion of Haiti, an impoverished island a short boat trip away (pop. 10 million).

Count Bobulescu
27-03-2013, 04:15 PM
On now, listen live or later.


Jonathan Katz was the only full-time American news correspondent working in Haiti at the time of the country's epic earthquake in 2010. In the aftermath of the disaster, billions of dollars and thousands of nongovernmental organization's flooded Haiti to aid in the recovery -- and Katz soon had plenty of foreign company. Today, many of the most basic promises of that recovery effort remain unfulfilled. We chat with Katz about what went wrong and what's in store for the country he covered for years.
Guests
Jonathan Katz
Author, "The Big Truck That Went By: How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster" (Palgrave Macillian, 2013)



http://thekojonnamdishow.org/shows/2013-03-27/big-truck-went

C. Flower
31-07-2014, 07:36 PM
http://www.undispatch.com/why-cholera-in-haiti-why-now


A dysfunctional puppet Government and a US military intervention designed for social control not reconstruction, have left the Haitian population in a desperately vulnerable situation.

A bit of Wikileaks light shed on the US attitude to Haiti.


On Feb. 29, 2004 – at about 6:15 a.m. – U.S. troops flew Haiti’s democratically elected president, Jean Bertrand Aristide, out of Haiti. In fact, they flew him out of the Western Hemisphere – all the way to the Central Africa Republic. According to the Bush administration’s comically implausible story, Aristide simply asked the U.S. to save him from a small group of insurgents led by a convicted death-squad leader, Jodel Chamblain. The public face of the insurgents was a crooked ex-police chief named Guy Philippe who had long standing ties with local elites and the U.S.. Chamblain was responsible for thousands of murders and rapes under a military junta that ruled Haiti from 1991 to 1994, after the first coup that ousted Aristide. It made sense to put the far younger Guy Philippe in front of cameras, but nobody with any knowledge of the 1991 coup had any excuse for failing to see what was coming in 2004.

The insurgents had been launching hit and run attacks into Haiti for years (since 2000) from the safe haven offered by the Dominican Republic, a U.S. client. Jeb Sprague’s book “Paramilitarism and the Assault on Democracy in Haiti” (http://monthlyreview.org/books/pb3003/) documents how key players among Aristides’ “peaceful opponents” in Haiti, along with military and government officials from the Dominican Republic, closely supported the insurgents who killed dozens of people while the international press (and the human rights industry) ignored it and depicted some of the financiers as victims of a “crackdown on dissent”. The “crackdown” was one of the excuses the Bush administration used to starve the Aristide government of funds for years with the help of the OAS. U.S.-led sanctions, among other things, blocked funds for projects to improve Haiti’s water supply to protect against the spread of diseases like cholera. At the same time, tens of millions of U.S. government dollars flowed to Aristide’s political rivals.
Sprague’s book reveals that, after Aristide was overthrown in 2004, hundreds of former rightist paramilitaries were incorporated into Haiti’s police force under the UN and U.S. Embassy’s close supervision. Anyone familiar with the 1991 coup will find this as unsurprising as it is disgusting. When the Clinton Administration ordered the Cédras military junta to stand down in 1994 (and permit Aristide to serve out what little was left of his first term in office), it did so only after guaranteeing impunity for the junta’s leaders and arranging for some of its henchmen to remain within Haiti’s security forces. Aristide, to some extent, countered those maneuvers by disbanding the Haitian army over strong U.S. objections. The re-constructed Haitian police remained infiltrated by officers close to the U.S. and local right-wing forces. Nevertheless, the U.S. and its allies were forced to a play a far more direct role in the 2004 coup because Haiti lacked its own army, the force traditionally used by the U.S. to bring down governments it dislikes.
A few months after the 2004 coup, UN troops (known by the French acronym MINUSTAH) took over the task of consolidating Gérard Latortue’s post-coup dictatorship. Roughly 4,000 of Aristide’s supporters were murdered under Latortue according to a scientific survey published in the Lancet medical journal [1]. Hundreds more, by conservative estimates, became political prisoners. Most of the killing was done by the police and death squads allied with them. MINUSTAH generally provided tactical support but also perpetrated its own atrocities. On July 5, 2005, MINUSTAH went on a shooting spree in the shanty town of Cité Soleil that was so murderous (and so well documented) that a MINUSTAH spokesman felt obliged to promptly state that it “deeply regrets any injuries or loss of life during its operation”. In 2012, MINUSTAH found some of its troops guilty of rape and sexual abuse. The actual perpetrators, to say nothing their commanding officers, have evaded serious consequences even when found guilty. Over a hundred MINUSTAH troops have been sent out of Haiti to “face justice” at home for sex crimes. Little wonder that abusers have been undeterred.

Thanks to Wikileaks, we need not speculate about exactly what the U.S. government wanted to get out of MINUSTAH in Haiti. In a 2008 cable, the U.S. Ambassador to Haiti predicted that the “security dividend the U.S. reaps from this hemispheric cooperation not only benefits the immediate Caribbean, but also is developing habits of security cooperation in the hemisphere…” She identified “resurgent populist and anti-market economy political forces” in Haiti as a threat to the entire hemisphere. She highlighted the importance of having other countries contribute towards neutralizing the threat:

“This regionally-coordinated Latin American commitment to Haiti would not be possible without the UN umbrella. That same umbrella helps other major donors — led by Canada and followed up by the EU, France, Spain, Japan and others — justify their bilateral assistance domestically.”


It won’t do for allies to explain to their own people that they are doing the USA’s dirty work in Haiti – helping it contain the political threat posed by “populist and anti-market forces” or, in other words, sacrificing Haiti as a pawn on a regional chessboard imagined by U.S. officials.


After two years of terrorizing Aristide’s supporters – murdering, imprisoning and driving them into exile -the U.S. and its allies allowed Haitians to elect a government to replace Latortue’s dictatorship. The presidency was won by René Préval – a former president and Aristide protégé who had played no role at all in the 2004 coup. It was a stunning refutation of the propaganda used to justify the coup. Préval won the election in the first round despite barely being able to campaign. Candidates who had been prominent leaders of the coup (Charles Baker, Guy Philippe) received single digit percentages of the vote.


The cables procured by Wikileaks show that Préval worried about being given the Aristide treatment while in office and treaded very carefully around U.S. officials. Former Brazilian diplomat, Ricardo Seitenfus, says that in 2010 MINUSTAH chief Edmond Mulet explicitly threatened Préval with a coup and exile for opposing U.S. interference in Haitian elections. Préval supposedly responded to Mulet’s threat by saying: “I am not Aristide. I am Salvador Allende”. Préval and Colin Granderson, head of the CARICOM-OAS Electoral Mission in Haiti in 2010-2011, have backed up the claim that Préval had been “asked” to step down.


Seitenfus has also strongly denounced the corruption and hypocrisy of the key governments that sustain MINUSTAH – in particular the infamous “core group”: the USA, Canada, France, Spain, and Brazil. Commenting on the impact of the 2010 earthquake that may have killed 200,000 people, Seitenfus remarked: “Traditionally in Haiti, the ‘goods’ such as hospitals, schools, and humanitarian aid are delivered by the private sector, while the ‘bads’ — that is, police enforcement — is the state’s responsibility. The earthquake further deepened this terrible dichotomy.”


An “aid” sector made up of foreign NGOs that are not accountable to the vast majority of Haitians breeds corruption and inefficiency, as former CARE employee Timothy Schwartz has also pointed out. It gives many NGOs, with some honorable exceptions, a strong incentive to thwart the development of democratic institutions in Haiti that would hold them accountable and take over many of their functions.
Brazil stepped up to play a leading role in MINUSTAH. Today, despite various MINUSTAH related scandals, Brazil continues to supply the largest contingent of troops. Uruguay supplies the second largest contingent though President Mujica has pledged to withdraw them. Bolivia and Ecuador also supply troops. Venezuela’s Chavista governments, on the other hand, always recognized the 2004 coup for what it was and never took part in MINUSTAH.

Thankfully, the backlash from Latin American governments was fierce when the USA and Canada maneuvered at the OAS to weaken a strong regional response against the 2009 coup in Honduras. Sanderson’s dream of “hemispheric cooperation” with the U.S. to defeat “populist and anti-market economy political forces” quickly became more of a fantasy. Edward Snowden’s revelations of extensive U.S. spying on the Brazilian government also poured cold water on the USA’s imperial dreamers. This year’s upper-class revolt in Venezuela – an undisguised attempt at “regime change” – was strongly opposed by the OAS, much to the Obama Administration’s dismay.
Rejecting coups and coup attempts is very important step in the right direction. However, Latin American governments should move beyond that. They should call for the prosecution of MINUSTAH officials like Edmond Mulet. Eventually, the prosecution of his bosses in Washington, Ottawa, and Paris might become a realistic option.
This article was first published by Telesur.

C. Flower
18-09-2014, 01:36 PM
More Wikileaks on the earthquake and the US response (hat tip to @redkahina). Timely given the news that the US is sending troops to Liberia ("to fight the ebola virus").
The cables confirm that as well as exerting political control, the invasion stemmed from US fears of mass movement of Haitian refugees to the US.
How very different from the many African countries that have taken in millions of refugees.

The US operation was assisted by ample hysterical and racist coverage in the media painting the Haitians as dangerous and uncivilised. Hilary Clinton directed that any media not following this line should be targetted.


http://www.thenation.com/article/161459/wikileaks-haiti-earthquake-cable

Washington deployed 22,000 troops to Haiti after the January 12, 2010, earthquake despite reports from the Haitian leadership, the US Embassy and the UN that no serious security threat existed, according to secret US diplomatic cables (http://wikileaks.fi/reldate/2011-06-15_0.html).

Cables made available by WikiLeaks show how disaster capitalists sought "opportunity" in the devastated country.

The cables, obtained by WikiLeaks, were made available to the Haitian newspaper Haïti Liberté, which is collaborating with The Nation on a series of reports (http://www.thenation.com/article/161009/wikihaiti-nation-partners-haiti-liberte-release-secret-haiti-cables) about US and UN policy toward the country.
Washington’s decision to send thousands of troops in response to the 7.0 earthquake that rocked the Haitian capital and surrounding areas drew sharp criticism from aid workers and government officials around the world at the time. They criticized the militarized response to Haiti’s humanitarian crisis as inappropriate and counterproductive. French Cooperation Minister Alain Joyandet famously said that international aid efforts should be “about helping Haiti, not about occupying Haiti.”

The earthquake-related cables also show that Washington was very sensitive to international criticism of its response and that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton mobilized her diplomatic corps to ferret out “irresponsible journalism” worldwide and “take action” to “get the narrative right.”

In a January 15 cable, Clinton told diplomatic posts and military commands that “approximately 4,000 U.S. military personnel will be in Haiti by January 16 and 10,000 personnel by January 18.” On January 17, Haitian President René Préval issued a “joint communiqué” with Clinton, in which Haiti requested that the United States “assist as needed in augmenting security,” helping to diminish the appearance of a unilateral US action and providing the rationale for what was to be the third US military intervention of Haiti in the past twenty years.
Aware that there would be international dismay about US troops playing a security role, Clinton outlined a series of talking points for diplomats and military officers in her January 22 cable. She said they should emphasize that “MINUSTAH [UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti, as the occupation force is called] has the primary international responsibility for security,” but that “in keeping with President Preval's request to the United States for assistance to augment security, the U.S. is providing every possible support... and is in no way supplanting the UN's role.”
Meanwhile, the UN claimed that its 9,000 occupation troops and police officers had the situation under control.

At a January 18 meeting between President Préval and international officials, former Guatemalan diplomat Edmond Mulet, MINUSTAH’s new chief, said his troops “were capable of providing security” in the country. (Mulet had flown in on a Pentagon plane the day before to take over from Hédi Annabi, who was killed with 101 other UN personnel when the Hotel Christopher, which acted as UN headquarters, collapsed during the quake.) Mulet “insisted that MINUSTAH be in charge of all security in Haiti, with other foreign military forces limited to humanitarian relief operations.”
On January 19, with Resolution 1908, the UN Security Council unanimously approved sending more than 3,500 reinforcements to Haiti “to support the immediate recovery, reconstruction and stability efforts,” increasing MINUSTAH to 12,651.

But Obama administration officials said the additional US troops were necessary.
"Until we can get ample supplies of food and water to people, there is a worry that in their desperation some will turn to violence,” Secretary of Defense Robert Gates told reporters six days after the quake. “And we will work with the UN in trying to ensure that the security situation remains good."

No Serious Security Threat After the Quake
After the quake, Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, resembled a war zone. Bodies lay strewn, collapsed buildings spilled into dust-filled streets, while Haitians frantically rushed to dig out survivors crying out from under hills of rubble. Several flattened neighborhoods looked as if bombing raids had destroyed them.
But the one element missing from this apocalyptic scene was an actual war or widespread violence. Instead, families sat down in the street, huddled around flickering candles with their belongings. Some wept, some sat in shellshocked silence, while others sang prayers, wailing for Jesus Christ in Kreyòl: “Jezi!”
In the quake’s chaotic aftermath, Préval and his prime minister, Jean-Max Bellerive, were out of touch with US government officials for about twenty-four hours. When they did connect, the Haitian leaders held a 3 pm meeting on January 14 with US Ambassador Kenneth Merten, the Jamaican prime minister, the Brazilian and EU ambassadors, and UN officials.
President Préval laid out priorities: “Re-establish telephone communications; Clear the streets of debris and bodies; Provide food and water to the population; Bury cadavers; Treat the injured; Coordination” among groups amid the destruction, a January 16 cable explains. Préval did not mention insecurity as a major concern. He did not ask for military troops.
But the same cable reports that “lead elements of the 82nd Airborne Division arrived today, with approximately 150 troops on the ground. More aircraft are expected to arrive tonight with troops and equipment.”
The US government had already initiated the deployment of considerable military assets to Haiti, according to the secret State Department cables--before the Haitian government, it appears, formally requested assistance. At its peak, the US military response included 22,000 soldiers--7,000 based on land and the remainder operating aboard fifty-eight aircraft and fifteen nearby vessels, according to the Pentagon. The Coast Guard was also flying spotter aircraft along Haiti’s coast to intercept any refugees from the disaster.

A January 14 cable from Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to US Embassies and Pentagon commands worldwide said that the US Embassy in Haiti “anticipates significant food shortages and looting in the affected areas.” But subsequent dispatches from Ambassador Merten in Haiti repeatedly describe "only sporadic” incidents of violence and looting.

One January 19 cable said that the “security situation in Haiti remains calm overall with no indications of mass migration towards North America.” Another cable that day said, “Residents were residing in made-shift [sic] camps in available open areas, and they had not yet received any humanitarian supplies from relief organization. Nonetheless, the residents were civil, calm, polite, solemn and seemed to be well-organized while they were searching for belongings in the ruins of their homes.”


We Recommend

WikiLeaks Haiti: Cable Depicts Fraudulent Haiti Election (http://www.thenation.com/article/161216/wikileaks-haiti-cable-depicts-fraudulent-haiti-election) (US Politics (http://www.thenation.com/section/us-politics), World (http://www.thenation.com/section/world))
Confirming what Haitians already knew, a WikiLeaks document shows how US and international donors pushed ahead with a rigged presidential election.

Dan Coughlin (http://www.thenation.com/authors/dan-coughlin) and Kim Ives (http://www.thenation.com/authors/kim-ives)
WikiLeaks Haiti: The Nation Partners With Haïti Liberté on Release of Secret Haiti Cables (http://www.thenation.com/article/161009/wikihaiti-nation-partners-haiti-liberte-release-secret-haiti-cables) (Disaster Capitalism (http://www.thenation.com/section/disaster-capitalism), Sweatshops (http://www.thenation.com/section/sweatshops), World (http://www.thenation.com/section/world))
Leaked documents provide an extraordinary glimpse of US maneuvering in Haiti from before the 2004 coup through the devastating 2010 earthquake.

Ansel Herz (http://www.thenation.com/authors/ansel-herz)

Ansel Herz is a freelance multimedia journalist based in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti.

Also by the Author

WikiLeaks Haiti: The Aristide Files (http://www.thenation.com/article/162598/wikileaks-haiti-aristide-files)
Secret US Embassy cables depict a far-reaching campaign to prevent Haiti's democratically elected leader from returning to the country after the 2004 coup.

WikiLeaks Haiti: The Post-Quake 'Gold Rush' for Reconstruction Contracts (http://www.thenation.com/article/161469/wikileaks-haiti-post-quake-gold-rush-reconstruction-contracts) (Business (http://www.thenation.com/section/business), World (http://www.thenation.com/section/world))

C. Flower
07-11-2014, 11:12 PM
There is a new book out on the same topic as this thread.

Extract :

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-the-world-came-to-help-haiti-and-left-a-disaster/

C. Flower
20-01-2015, 08:47 PM
A lot of questions being asked about Bill Clinton's Haitian trust - not many answers coming *redacted*

http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2015/01/20/hait-j20.html

Haiti as of the last two days has a one-man government.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/01/19/us-haiti-martelly-government-idUSKBN0KS0CG20150119

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/haiti/article7601129.html

DCon
18-09-2016, 04:24 PM
Things getting interesting





He just challenged Trump to ask Hillary Clinton to publish the audit of all the money they have stolen from Haiti in 2010.




http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-09-17/haitian-president-exposes-clinton-foundation-hillary-clinton-tried-bribe-me

Count Bobulescu
18-09-2016, 10:12 PM
I'd like to take this opportunity to offer CF an apology. Upthread I disputed her claim that Nepalese/UN soldiers had been responsible for the post-earthquake outbreak of Cholera. A few weeks ago the UN officially took responsibility.

C. Flower
15-04-2017, 02:25 PM
I'd like to take this opportunity to offer CF an apology. Upthread I disputed her claim that Nepalese/UN soldiers had been responsible for the post-earthquake outbreak of Cholera. A few weeks ago the UN officially took responsibility.

A gracious apology, and accepted.

C. Flower
15-04-2017, 02:36 PM
I missed this report filed by John Pilger back in 2010. I'm relieved that I was not the only person to have noticed that the US invaded Haiti- and he nailed it down more clearly than I did.


28 January 2010
The theft of Haiti has been swift and crude. On 22 January, the United States secured "formal approval" from the United Nations to take over all air and sea ports in Haiti, and to "secure" roads. No Haitian signed the agreement, which has no basis in law. Power rules in a US naval blockade and the arrival of 13,000 marines, special forces, spooks and mercenaries, none with humanitarian relief training.


The airport in the capital, Port-au-Prince, is now a US military base and relief flights have been rerouted to the Dominican Republic. All flights stopped for three hours for the arrival of Hillary Clinton. Critically injured Haitians waited unaided as 800 American residents in Haiti were fed, watered and evacuated. Six days passed before the US air force dropped bottled water to people suffering dehydration.

The first TV reports played a critical role, giving the impression of widespread criminal mayhem. Matt Frei, the BBC reporter despatched from Washington, seemed on the point of hyperventilating as he brayed about the "violence" and need for "security". In spite of the demonstrable dignity of the earthquake victims, and evidence of citizens' groups toiling unaided to rescue people, and even a US general's assessment that the violence in Haiti was considerably less than before the earthquake, Frei claimed that "looting is the only industry" and "the dignity of Haiti's past is long forgotten".


Thus, a history of unerring US violence and exploitation in Haiti was consigned to the victims. "There's no doubt," reported Frei in the aftermath of America's bloody invasion of Iraq in 2003, "that the desire to bring good, to bring American values to the rest of the world, and especially now to the Middle East . . . is now increasingly tied up with military power."

In a sense, he was right. Never before in so-called peacetime have human relations been as militarised by rapacious power

http://johnpilger.com/articles/the-kidnapping-of-haiti