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View Full Version : Coalition will impose "Discipline and Fear" on Public Sector Workers - Letwin



C. Flower
09-10-2011, 06:21 PM
Westminster Bridge was blocked today by protests against destruction of the National Health Service.

Battle lines are serious. The Coalition's policy Minister says that "discipline and fear" - through the threat of unemployment - are needed to "reform" the service.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2011/jul/30/public-sector-jobs-oliver-letwin

The Coalition plans to cut 4 billion from the North of Ireland alone.

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/About/General/2011/10/9/1318169706137/Uk-uncut-and-health-worke-007.jpg

Baron von Biffo
09-10-2011, 06:59 PM
The Coalition plans to cut 4 billion from the North of Ireland alone.

What's McGuinness doing in the presidential election when there's cuts he could actually do something about in the job he left on hold?

AntiPublicSectorGreed
09-10-2011, 07:32 PM
Britain doesnt have the money to fund the NHS. The BoE had to literally print another 75 billion last week, just to keep the public sector paid. Any more money printing and food inflation will become unbearable. Its already running at 5%.

You can kiss the NHS goodbye. Poor countries cannot not afford such luxuries as unlimited free GP visits for everyone in the audience. Unless you can convince those doctors to work for free.

Maybe they should get some Medicine Sans Frontieres into the UK.

Griska
09-10-2011, 07:38 PM
What's McGuinness doing in the presidential election when there's cuts he could actually do something about in the job he left on hold?

Perhaps you've answered your own question, Baron.

Kev Bar
09-10-2011, 07:43 PM
Cactus - your man sounds like he read the e-mail from the Wall St Trader which was a declaration of war on the protestors.

morticia
10-10-2011, 09:11 PM
What's McGuinness doing in the presidential election when there's cuts he could actually do something about in the job he left on hold?

He might be thinking that in 10 years time, the south might have more cash than the Brits.

Their property rose by 151% to our 171%.......their mortgage lending has also shrunk to a small % of its 2007 glory, but.....house prices haven't really dropped much yet.

How is that possible?? British national debt is over 160% GDP if you include PFI.

They're trying to devalue and inflate their way out (probably correct course of action), but for that to work, they need to stop borrowing....and the wars are ongoing.

...the old age pension there pays just over 400 per month...the Dolers are on 65 or so per week, and there are over 2.5 million unemployed. 5% inflation, and no rises.

There will be riots, in more places than London. Just my theory, but I think that's why McGuinness and Adams are down here.

Kitty O'Shea
11-10-2011, 06:47 PM
House prices in the UK never reached the dizzing heights as our did, even in the Posh suburbs of London but I think that the prices are controlled though taxation, i.e council tax is based on the value of the property, which is decided by the local government. There is a housing shortage in the UK that Westminister are tackling by reducing the myriad of planning laws down to 16 pages or so. Also, rents have sky rocketed, esp in London as it's the only city where there are jobs, no-one can afford to buy property (esp in London) except for rich Russians so houses are out of the reach of most folk.
Regarding the riots, the problem is that a lot of Londoners in poorer will never work, there simply are never enough jobs for everyone. They live next door to the rich folk e.g. South Ealing and see how wealthy the more well-off are and they will never achieve that. The only reason why, as in the case of London riots that such a fuss was made about rioters only thinking about sneakers is because that is all they can think about.
This information is all courtesy my sister, who lives in London.
Unemployment benefits are lower, but the cost of living was much lower than here, but as already said inflation has pushed the prices of e.g. food up . Also in the UK unemployed get housing benefits to cover their rent and council tax is discounted or reduced. They also get free medical care, as also pointed out already.
My mother nursed in the NHS many moons ago & she reckoned it was the best health care system ever, it was very patient focused. . She trained as a nurse with no contribution from Ireland and she could avail of the care straight away. Unfortunately it changed under the Tories and is now overly bureaucratic, we think there are too many mangers in HSE, the UK has a lot more middle mangers and clerical staff. The frontline services do their best with ever restrictive budgets.
well that's my tuppence worth!

C. Flower
11-10-2011, 07:25 PM
House prices in the UK never reached the dizzing heights as our did, even in the Posh suburbs of London but I think that the prices are controlled though taxation, i.e council tax is based on the value of the property, which is decided by the local government. There is a housing shortage in the UK that Westminister are tackling by reducing the myriad of planning laws down to 16 pages or so. Also, rents have sky rocketed, esp in London as it's the only city where there are jobs, no-one can afford to buy property (esp in London) except for rich Russians so houses are out of the reach of most folk.
Regarding the riots, the problem is that a lot of Londoners in poorer will never work, there simply are never enough jobs for everyone. They live next door to the rich folk e.g. South Ealing and see how wealthy the more well-off are and they will never achieve that. The only reason why, as in the case of London riots that such a fuss was made about rioters only thinking about sneakers is because that is all they can think about.
This information is all courtesy my sister, who lives in London.
Unemployment benefits are lower, but the cost of living was much lower than here, but as already said inflation has pushed the prices of e.g. food up . Also in the UK unemployed get housing benefits to cover their rent and council tax is discounted or reduced. They also get free medical care, as also pointed out already.
My mother nursed in the NHS many moons ago & she reckoned it was the best health care system ever, it was very patient focused. . She trained as a nurse with no contribution from Ireland and she could avail of the care straight away. Unfortunately it changed under the Tories and is now overly bureaucratic, we think there are too many mangers in HSE, the UK has a lot more middle mangers and clerical staff. The frontline services do their best with ever restrictive budgets.
well that's my tuppence worth!

Thanks for that, and welcome, Kitty O'Shea.

The NHS was brought in much poorer times, but the idea was that everyone should get treatment, no matter what their income. I watched a documentary on it last year and it said that in the first couple of years doctors were busy with very basic but necessary operations like hernia repair - truss makers went out of business. People had been walking around disabled by complaints that were quickly fixed.

In Ireland, there are a lot of people not going to the doctor for want of money. The same with the dentist. I went the other day, and I was the only patient in the building - even last year there would have been half a dozen in the waiting room.

Pushing wages down in the UK public sector will not help anything. They are not overpaid.

DCon
13-11-2011, 12:00 PM
1 million workers is an awful lot


One million state workers are to be transferred out of hospitals, colleges and job centres as part of David Cameron's "aggressive aspiration" to create John Lewis-mutual style public services.

With little fanfare, services across the country are being quietly taken over by their own staff – state funded but run independently. The Prime Minister claims the number of services that adopt the scheme will be a key test of his Big Society vision.

Mr Cameron told MPs: "Why are we doing all this? In the end, it is to try to make sure that we have better schools, that we have hospitals treating patients better, that we have better-run care homes. This is all just the mechanics under the car bonnet to make the car work better. But to me, mutuals are one way to get that."

At least 45,000 health workers have already left the public sector under the programme, including 10,000 nurses. A new right to request, where staff or a voluntary organisation can ask to run a service, has been created.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/cameron-seeks-to-push-one-million-workers-out-of-the-public-sector-6261605.html