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View Full Version : Eamon Gilmore Wants a Fair, Merit-Driven Economy



C. Flower
03-07-2011, 12:22 AM
I think this speech by Eamon Gilmore deserves a little chewing over...



ONLY BOLDNESS AND WILLINGNESS TO TAKE ON DIFFICULT TASKS WILL ENSURE SUCCESS - GILMORE


Colleagues and Friends

It is right that, once again tonight, we honour the memory of Jim Kemmy – a man who represents for many of us, the best traditions of the Labour Party.

In the twelve months since the last Kemmy lecture, the political and economic landscape in Ireland has radically changed radically. In those twelve months, Ireland has been forced to seek foreign assistance to finance our economy and our state. There has been a General Election that has ended the long dominance of Fianna fail over Irish politics, and ended parliamentary representation for the Greens. And we have seen the formation of a new kind of Government – a coalition of the two largest parties in the state – in effect a national Government established with the aim of saving the national economy.

These have been truly momentous times, that will be discussed and analysed by historians in years to come. But the pressing questions for us, now, are not about the recent past – they are about the future. About the scale and nature of the task before us, and the challenges that lie ahead.

We know those challenges are great. Restoring Ireland’s economy. Creating jobs for our people. Reforming Government and politics so as to restore trust among the people. And doing it fairly. Those are enormous tasks. But we face into those tasks, from a position of strength.

On this occasion, in 2008, I outlined my vision of the Labour Party as a party of Government. Not a niche party, but a party that draws support from all sectors of Irish society. In 2009, I set out my belief that the next General Election would be a three-way competition between Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael, and Labour, and that Labour’s ambition – just as it is the ambition of those other parties – must be to become the largest party in the Dáil.

I think it is fair to say, that when I first began to lay out my ambition for our party, there were many who thought those ambitions more idealistic than realistic.

Yet today, the Labour Party has never been larger or stronger. In the past four years, we have built
Our largest ever representation in the Dáil
Our largest ever representation in the Senate
Our largest ever representation at local level.

Our organisation has never been wider, or our membership larger. We are part of a Government with a commanding majority and a popular mandate. Our Ministers are experienced, capable, hard-working and willing to make difficult decisions.

What I say to you tonight, is that Labour is a rising force in Irish politics, and that we have further to go.

I know there are some who are concerned that participation in Government will inflict political cost on Labour. I know there are some who believe this, but whose sense of duty to their country compelled them to support our participation in Government. But as I said at our special delegate conference, when we approved the Programme for Government, I do not share that view. The task of this Government is clear – to rescue the Irish economy – and if we succeed in that task, there is no reason why Labour should not continue to grow. When Fianna Fáil took over the reins of power in 1932, the Irish economy was in profound crisis. Yet during that time they cemented their position in Irish politics for decades to come.

The Irish people know full well the scale of the problems that we have inherited. They know and acknowledge that there are difficult days ahead and difficult decisions that will have to be taken. What they want and expect of us is that we will apply ourselves to the task. That we will tell the truth, and that we will make our decisions based on an appreciation of the realities of their lives. And they know too, that for this Government, failure is not an option.

So, let us be absolutely clear – for Labour, our political and governmental objectives are fully aligned. Once again, as it was before, the cause of Labour is the cause of Ireland, and the cause of Ireland, is the cause of Labour.

But let us also be clear, that only boldness and imagination, and a willingness to take on difficult tasks, will ensure success. This is not a time for half-measures, or half-heartedness. Labour is a progressive, modernising party. We are at our best, when we are leading change, and, in the days ahead, we can offer the Irish people nothing less than our best.

Our first priority must be to restore Ireland’s economic independence.

Since taking office, we have applied ourselves to this task on four fronts. Firstly, we have made important decisions that have given clarity about the future of the Irish banking system. The stress tests that were produced on the 31st of March, and our commitment to recapitalise the banks, have been well received, and there is a view that we are, at last, drawing a line under the disaster in the banking system. We have made it clear that, in future, Ireland will have two pillar banks that are focused on the needs of the real Irish economy. And we are ensuring that these banks have the capacity to provide credit to the economy, even as they are downsized. As part of this re-capitalisation, we are seeking contributions from bond-holders, and we have made it clear, that in the Government’s view, that includes Senior bond-holders in Anglo and Nationwide.

Secondly, we have set about the task of restoring the public finances. Brendan Howlin has established a comprehensive expenditure review, that will look at all areas of public spending, to see what we really need to keep, and what we can manage without. We are determined to avoid the mistakes made by Fianna Fáil, where public expenditure cuts were crude and poorly thought through. That does not mean that there wont be difficult decisions to make – there will. But at the end of this process, we must come out with a leaner and reformed public service that looks to the future with confidence.

Thirdly, we have begun the work of rebuilding our reputation and relationships with the wider world. In our short time in office, Ireland’s reputation has begun to rise again. We have made it clear that Ireland is willing to its part in dealing with this great economic crisis. What we ask is that others will play their part also.


And fourthly, we have made it clear that we will prioritise jobs and growth. Yesterday, a number of the provisions of the jobs initiative came into force, including the VAT cut for Tourism and some other sectors, the Jobs Bridge Internship scheme, and the restoration of the National Minimum wage. Right across the country this summer, there will be jobs supported and created through capital spending on schools, traffic schemes, and non-national roads.

These measures are part of our broader strategy, to fundamentally re-tool our economy, shifting away from the get rich quick pyramid scheme economics of Fianna Fáil. Ireland is a small open economy that exports 80% of what we produce. Our living standards are dependent on our relationships with others – relationships of trade and investment, commerce and culture. Our future lies in developing our strengths in innovation and entrepreneurship. We have natural advantages in the food sector; scientific R&D; renewable energy; IT and communications; tourism; the arts. Our task is to exploit these advantages, and develop new products and services, that can be exported around the world.

We must also respond to a global shift in the location of wealth creation and economic growth. While Europe and the US are struggling to emerge from the financial crisis, India and China are growing at 10% per annum. China is now the second largest economy in the world, and the Indian economy will double in the next decade. Yet, only 2% of Ireland’s exports go to China and 0.2% go to India. As a country we need to think again about how we position ourselves in the world, with all of the diplomatic, cultural and economic implications of such a strategic shift in thinking. The Government is responding to this change through a series of concrete measures, including the creation of a new Trade Council, the first meeting of which I will chair this month.

Our objective in is not only economic recovery, but sustainable, and forward-facing recovery and the forging of a fair, merit-driven society. For Ireland to be a country where a person’s future is determined by hard work and the content of their character, rather than the circumstances they are born into.

A meritocratic economy is one that can draw on the full spectrum of talent in our country. One where young people are not lost to poor literacy. One where those who hold power are not afraid to be challenged. Where the incumbent generation is willing to expand privilege and opportunity, not ration it.

The Job Bridge internship scheme proposed by Labour before the election, launched this week by Minister Joan Burton, is a practical example of what we can do to advance this ideal, and help young people break into the labour market, regardless of what their parents earn or who they know.

This twin objective – of fixing our economy, and ensuring that everyone can participate in its recovery – is challenging in other ways too.

It challenges us to create a healthier society. It challenges us to have a better educated society. It challenges us to improve the public services that support our economy, and help people participate fully in our society.

None of this is news to the Labour Party. As a social democratic party, we know that good public services; good health services; an effective education system are not drains on the economy, but enablers of it.

But the fact is, we are going to have to achieve these things in the context of smaller budgets, that have to decline further. And the fact is too, that even if Ireland did not have to fix its public finances, the world around us is changing, and public services have to change with it.

Let there be no doubt: as a people – and as a party – we will not succeed in regaining our economic sovereignty, and in fixing what is broken in our country, if every single spending cut, and every single reform is resisted.

Further reductions in public spending is not something I, or anyone in the Labour Party takes on lightly. Public services make a significant difference in people’s day to day lives; I cannot say that the decisions we have to make will be easy.

But it cannot be true that every service improvement requires more resources. And no one can argue that all public spending is currently achieving all of its objectives.

We are all required – citizens, politicians, public servants – to tackle our large budget deficit honestly, fairly, and without special pleading. We do have choices to make, as a nation, about what our priorities are. But we do not have a choice about facing up to the gap between what we spend as a country, and what we take in. The Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform, Brendan Howlin, is leading the way, including his recent measures to rein-in high level pay in the public service and the semi-state companies.

And there is a greater prize here. The creation of a new relationship between the people, and the public service. Where people are once again willing to invest in the public sphere, because they are convinced that the public service, is lean and efficient, acts in their interest, and can deliver.

So that when our economy recovers; when the hard work and sacrifice pays off; then the benefits of that recovery must also be fair. That means greater security, growing employment, knowing that mortgage payments can be met. But it also means enriching our society, taking the crisis out of getting sick with universal health insurance; making sure that our schools work for every child; forging public services that people trust and support.

As I said at the outset, Labour is the growing force in Irish politics. But we know, that across Europe, the left is in retreat. Even though it has the ideology of the right that created the crisis, the left has suffered several electoral reverses. The lesson we must take from that experience, is that the left will only succeed, when we place ourselves at the forefront of reform, not when we oppose it. The world is changing – it was changing before the crisis, and it is changing even more quickly now. The challenge to the left is to respond to that change, and to lead it. To put ourselves at the forefront of change, where our best instincts are – progressive, not conservative, leading change, not following it.

If we do that, as we must, and if we succeed in the core task of rescuing the Irish economy, as we must, then we will continue to grow in strength and support, and so will our country.

PaddyJoe
03-07-2011, 12:52 AM
I really can't see very much there that couldn't be delivered by Enda Kenny or Micheal Martin. A couple of minor tweaks perhaps but it is a fair statement of the FF/FG/Lab consensus.

ang
03-07-2011, 01:41 AM
Just letting us know that this Government intends cutting along the lines of Edward scissorhands on coke.

No rationale and protection of the "systemic elites" being the priority.

PaddyJoe
03-07-2011, 01:48 AM
I know there are some who are concerned that participation in Government will inflict political cost on Labour. I know there are some who believe this, but whose sense of duty to their country compelled them to support our participation in Government. But as I said at our special delegate conference, when we approved the Programme for Government, I do not share that view. The task of this Government is clear – to rescue the Irish economy – and if we succeed in that task, there is no reason why Labour should not continue to grow. When Fianna Fáil took over the reins of power in 1932, the Irish economy was in profound crisis. Yet during that time they cemented their position in Irish politics for decades to come. Who the hell is writing his speeches? Way wrong and stupid from every possible angle:eek:

Edo
03-07-2011, 02:01 AM
Who the hell is writing his speeches? Way wrong and stupid from every possible angle:eek:

God yeah -someone should also tell him that FF did not win an overall majority at that election and it was with labour party support that Dev was first elected Taoiseach in 1932 and the rest is history.

Gobsh^tes.

PaddyJoe
03-07-2011, 02:06 AM
God yeah -someone should also tell him that FF did not win an overall majority at that election and it was with labour party support that Dev was first elected Taoiseach in 1932 and the rest is history.

Gobsh^tes.
I was also thinking that equating themselves with FF is not the smartest move right now:)

TotalMayhem
03-07-2011, 09:30 AM
In a merit-driven society, he wouldn't be Tánaiste but rather be living below the bread line and nobody would care for his speeches.

antiestablishmentarian
03-07-2011, 10:54 AM
The Job Bridge internship scheme proposed by Labour before the election, launched this week by Minister Joan Burton, is a practical example of what we can do to advance this ideal, and help young people break into the labour market, regardless of what their parents earn or who they know.



He lost me at this. As for 'FF get rich quick pyramid schemes', didn't his wife do quite well out of the boom if memory serves correct :rolleyes:?

Baron von Biffo
03-07-2011, 11:20 AM
Jim Kemmy brought down a government because one of the Brutons was attacking the poor. Now the other Bruton is planning much worse attacks on the poor but he'll have the full and enthusiastic support of Gilmore and the rest of Blue Labour.

Gilmore giving the Kemmy Lecture isn't honouring Kemmy, rather it's using his reputation to justify odious policies that Kemmy would have opposed tooth and nail.

C. Flower
03-07-2011, 12:08 PM
God yeah -someone should also tell him that FF did not win an overall majority at that election and it was with labour party support that Dev was first elected Taoiseach in 1932 and the rest is history.

Gobsh^tes.

So Gilmore is suggesting that Labour should cement Fine Gael in power ?
Worth remembering what FG was doing in the 1930s, in full Blueshirt regalia.

The word socialism doesn't appear. Meritocracy is support for privilege, and he is quite blatant about this.


A meritocratic economy is one that can draw on the full spectrum of talent in our country. One where young people are not lost to poor literacy. One where those who hold power are not afraid to be challenged. Where the incumbent generation is willing to expand privilege and opportunity, not ration it.

Captain Con O'Sullivan
03-07-2011, 02:15 PM
Have to say I don't appreciate our friend the American spy invoking the name of Jim Kemmy who was a very decent man and did his best in trying circumstances and was more of a representative to the disenfranchised than Gilmore and his accomodating pals will ever be.

Something grim about Gilmore using Jim Kemmy like this.

Griska
03-07-2011, 02:41 PM
Gizmore is only fulfilling the role that many predicted for him twenty-odd years ago.

I also understand that he is incensed by the amount of leaks coming from the Labour Parliamentary Party and is trying to rule with an iron fist.
On the couple of occasions I've met him, this strikes me as amusing.

Apjp
03-07-2011, 02:58 PM
Have to say I don't appreciate our friend the American spy invoking the name of Jim Kemmy who was a very decent man and did his best in trying circumstances and was more of a representative to the disenfranchised than Gilmore and his accomodating pals will ever be.

Something grim about Gilmore using Jim Kemmy like this.

I always sided with stalin when it came to dealing with ex stalinists. I dont see why we shouldnt apply that logic here re this ex stalinist.

Sent from my GT-I5500 using Tapatalk

Captain Con O'Sullivan
03-07-2011, 03:04 PM
Which one? Kemmy or the American spy?

eamo
03-07-2011, 11:06 PM
There comes a point when the potential of a persons life is spent, with some, it is in death, some old age, some a faithful decision. Eamon Gilmores end came when he decided, not to leave the Worker's Party, but to join with those who tried to destroy that party. Leaving would have been the honorable thing to do. No shame in changing ones opinions. I heard him avowing "class politics". I saw him stab comrades through the heart. He should have left. No harm in changing. Maybe change was where his intelligence was leading him, in that case he should have left. Without the betrayal.
Now he has achieved high status, high influence and some power, but no power to change in any profound way this society. He may manage the rotten system a bit better than others. I hope he does. But the potential is gone, he is finding himself supporting the thing he once fought against. The fight for a humane society has passed to others in the WP, ULA, SP, and SF(though I never thought I would see the day) and many many individuals and independents and people who struggle to be kind.
I was never a prominent member of the WP in case anyone is wondering. But I saw the betrayal close up. I even saw him at Tomas MacGiolla's funeral. Sell out stinks.

Captain Con O'Sullivan
03-07-2011, 11:09 PM
He's a 'pretty straight kinda guy'. I've heard of them in connection with the Labour Party before somewhere...

Won't be long before he starts looking like Gormley.

eamo
03-07-2011, 11:16 PM
Won't be long before he starts looking like Gormley.
Sadly it is so, Captain.

Captain Con O'Sullivan
03-07-2011, 11:27 PM
It is a role laid out for him as surely as the casting of a Shakespearian tragedy.

Hi character arc might be ... at the heart of government and influencing governmenty police and then as storm clouds gather he will seek meetings with the Taoiseach as if they worked in different cities and emerge reassured from those meetings. Then something else will happen and someone in Fine Gael will accused him of not pulling his weight in government. Again he'll make reassuring noises and then require supportive statements carefully worded from Kenny. Then the lines in the coalition sand will be crossed and he'll try to explain that they were never strictly lines in the sand anyway.

This will all take two years and the third will be taken up with Eamonn trying to manage his way through to the three year qualifier for the full Ministerial pension and perks- there'll be dark rumours of a heave within the Labour Party which will come to nothing.

There'll be a scuffle and Eamonn will retire after being stabbed in the back by a few likely Brutii. It'll rain. A car will run over a dog somewhere.

Griska
04-07-2011, 01:09 AM
There comes a point when the potential of a persons life is spent, with some, it is in death, some old age, some a faithful decision. Eamon Gilmores end came when he decided, not to leave the Worker's Party, but to join with those who tried to destroy that party. Leaving would have been the honorable thing to do. No shame in changing ones opinions. I heard him avowing "class politics". I saw him stab comrades through the heart. He should have left. No harm in changing. Maybe change was where his intelligence was leading him, in that case he should have left. Without the betrayal.
Now he has achieved high status, high influence and some power, but no power to change in any profound way this society. He may manage the rotten system a bit better than others. I hope he does. But the potential is gone, he is finding himself supporting the thing he once fought against. The fight for a humane society has passed to others in the WP, ULA, SP, and SF(though I never thought I would see the day) and many many individuals and independents and people who struggle to be kind.
I was never a prominent member of the WP in case anyone is wondering. But I saw the betrayal close up. I even saw him at Tomas MacGiolla's funeral. Sell out stinks.

I was in the WP, Eamo.
Gizmore was viewed with suspicion by many even before the split was mooted.
I'd say he has realised his potential, in that he holds a largely irrelevant office, but has a modicum of status.

Binn Beal
04-07-2011, 09:46 AM
Honouring Jim Kemmy?
As I recall Jim brought down the FG-Labour government when the 'meritocracy' wanted to tax children's shoes (because women with small feet might get away with paying VAT).
Is there a possible Kemmy among the present crop Labour time-servers?

Apjp
04-07-2011, 09:51 AM
Which one? Kemmy or the American spy?

Gilmore. Much worse than kemmy

Sent from my GT-I5500 using Tapatalk

Captain Con O'Sullivan
04-07-2011, 01:13 PM
Kemmy was one of the few decent people I've ever come across in Irish politics. Just noticing Gilmore's speech there is headed with an odd salutation;

'Colleagues and Friends' sounds like he's drawing a line between people he works with and people he likes. It is probably the section of his speech with the highest honesty content.

Griska
04-07-2011, 01:42 PM
Kemmy was one of the few decent people I've ever come across in Irish politics. Just noticing Gilmore's speech there is headed with an odd salutation;

'Colleagues and Friends' sounds like he's drawing a line between people he works with and people he likes. It is probably the section of his speech with the highest honesty content.

Imagine, a few short years ago, he'd have begun with "Comrades".

ang
04-07-2011, 08:09 PM
Eamon wants an end to "special pleading" when cuts are announced.

Take your medecine and be quiet about it is the sort of attitude Labour wish us all to take:-


THE ECONOMY will never recover if “every single spending cut and every single reform” in the public sector is resisted, Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore has said .

He has also urged people to desist from special pleading when future cuts were being introduced.

Speaking at a Labour Youth event in Kilkenny, Mr Gilmore said that as the leader of the party he viewed a well resourced public sector as an “enabler” of the economy rather than a drain on it.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2011/0704/1224300033674.html

Captain Con O'Sullivan
04-07-2011, 08:23 PM
Imagine, a few short years ago, he'd have begun with "Comrades".

Thats how it went with the British Labour Party. First there was a conversation about becoming electable.

Then the word 'socialism' was banned from conferences. People bought business suits so they'd look acceptable as a candidate to the nervous middle class.

Then they forgot to brake and become more capitalist than the Tories- arms deals, deals with Washington, a trumped up war and the rest.

Orwell had the piggies sussed...

Dr. FIVE
19-08-2011, 03:27 PM
A swimming pool in Tanaiste Eamon Gilmore's constituency is getting funding despite 11 other pools around the country awaiting grants.
The pool in Loughlinstown in Mr Gilmore's constituency of DunLaoghaire/Rathdown is getting just under 4 million.

It's more than half this year's national budget for pools.

:rolleyes:

TotalMayhem
19-08-2011, 03:35 PM
Honi soit qui mal y pense!

Captain Con O'Sullivan
19-08-2011, 03:41 PM
Maybe there's a channel from her recent land sale and a leaseback deal so she can swim down a chute right-of-way and straight into the pool. Security reasons.

disability student
19-08-2011, 04:08 PM
Maybe there's a channel from her recent land sale and a leaseback deal so she can swim down a chute right-of-way and straight into the pool. Security reasons.

AIB + BOI have been doing sale & leasebacks deals recently with regards to their selected branches & properties. I think it has some elements to claiming back tax reliefs. Must check with my tax notes.:eek:

Captain Con O'Sullivan
19-08-2011, 04:10 PM
'Eamon Gilmore Wants a Fair, Merit-Driven Economy' - confirms will be working from home on the Kiribati Islands for forseeable future.

disability student
19-08-2011, 04:12 PM
'Eamon Gilmore Wants a Fair, Merit-Driven Economy' - confirms will be working from home on the Kiribati Islands for forseeable future.

Labour are now seen more like a right wing party as he has refurbished the tanaiste's office nearer to Kenny's office. Any chance of finding out the costs of this refurnishment via FOI??

Griska
19-08-2011, 05:08 PM
Labour are now seen more like a right wing party as he has refurbished the tanaiste's office nearer to Kenny's office. Any chance of finding out the costs of this refurnishment via FOI??

Indeed.
It would be a push to even describe them as Social Democrats, these days.

Buddha
19-08-2011, 05:22 PM
He's a 'pretty straight kinda guy'. I've heard of them in connection with the Labour Party before somewhere...

Won't be long before he starts looking like Gormley.

Far as I'm concerned he already is another Gormley. Him and the rest of the hypocrites. Rendition Flights - Must'nt upset the Yanks. Cuts in education, health, social welfare - Lower the Red Flag quickly - Must'nt upset the E.U. And again I say and will continue saying til I shuffle off this mortal coil whatever the feck that is, as soon as they get caught up in the power game, the comfortable protected bubble that is Leinster House, the rest of the country can feck off because we no longer exist. And the back-benchers retreat to their constituencies to do the parish pump *****, or just have a party in Dublin whilst the job lasts. Been there, seen it, again and again and again.

It's called THE BLAME GAME.

bormotello
19-08-2011, 05:27 PM
Labour are now seen more like a right wing party
What else can they do if there is no real alternative to right wing ideology and nobody believes to left wing rhetoric without explanation where leftwingers are going to get money for everything what they promised?

Captain Con O'Sullivan
19-08-2011, 06:55 PM
American owned political pygmy as most coalition leaders always are. About as much real power as an oligarch's girlfriend and hanging around for much the same reason.