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View Full Version : Secret Worlds: The Universe Within = WOW!



janepaisley
12-11-2010, 11:44 AM
click this link for a fascinating sequence of views of the universe 10 million years away from the milky way right down to the smallest quarts in a carbon atom

http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/j...f10/index.html



View the Milky Way at 10 million light years from the Earth. Then move through space towards the Earth in successive orders of magnitude until you reach a tall oak tree just outside the buildings of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, Florida. After that, begin to move from the actual size of a leaf into a microscopic world that reveals leaf cell walls, the cell nucleus, chromatin, DNA and finally, into the subatomic universe of electrons and protons.

Notice how each picture is actually an image of something that is 10 times bigger or smaller than the one preceding or following it. The number that appears on the lower right just below each image is the size of the object in the picture. On the lower left is the same number written in powers of ten, or exponential notation. Exponential notation is a convenient way for scientists to write very large or very small numbers. For example, compare the size of the Earth to the size of a plant cell, which is a trillion times smaller:

Earth = 12.76 x 10+6 = 12,760,000 meters wide
(12.76 million meters)

Plant Cell = 12.76 x 10-6 = 0.00001276 meters wide
(12.76 millionths of a meter)

Scientists examine things in particular ways using a combination of very sophisticated equipment, everyday instruments, and many unlikely tools. Some phenomena that scientists want to observe are so tiny that they need a magnifying glass, or even a microscope. Other things are so far away that a powerful telescope must be used in order to see them. It is important to understand and be able to compare the size of things we are studying. To learn more about the relative sizes of things, visit our Perspectives: Powers of 10 activity site.

Note: - The sequence of images in this tutorial has been optimized for maximum visual impact. Due to the fact that discrete exponential increments are not always the most convenient interval for illustrating this concept, our artists and programmers have made dimensional approximations in some cases. As a consequence, the relative size and positioning of several objects in the tutorial reflect this fact.

Hapax
12-11-2010, 12:12 PM
click this link for a fascinating sequence of views of the universe 10 million years away from the milky way right down to the smallest quarts in a carbon atom

http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/j...f10/index.html

That URL doesn't work directly, Jane. Can you tell us how to get there through the menus drilling down from the top level of the site, which is accessible? Thanks.

wickedfairy
12-11-2010, 01:13 PM
excellent stuff Janepaisley, copied the link and went in thru the website. Stunning stuff alright, how tiny we are in the grand scheme of things.

janepaisley
12-11-2010, 01:44 PM
excellent stuff Janepaisley, copied the link and went in thru the website. Stunning stuff alright, how tiny we are in the grand scheme of things.

:D isnt it completely mind blowing when you see the scale of things

i'll put up this link hopefully to make access easier for anyone else.

RECOMMENDED!!

http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/index.html

Hapax
12-11-2010, 02:26 PM
Ah! Now that works no problem. Thanks!

Maybe this is "the wider picture" people sometimes tell me I'm missing.

I was hoping it might zero in on a few tobacco plants at some point, but no.