PDA

View Full Version : Dearg le Fearg - Protest for Irish Language Rights - Dublin Sat Feb 15th 2014



C. Flower
14-02-2014, 01:59 PM
Protest tomorrow the 15th Feb, in Dublin for Irish language rights, starting at Parnell Sq and marching to Leinster
house.

There are buses going from gaeltacht areas in Donegal and looking for support from everywhere.

Deis le do chuid feirge a léiriú ar mhórshiúl Lá Mór na Gaeilge i mBaile Átha Cliath ar 15 Feabhra 2014

Description
Ag cruinniú poiblí i nGaoth Dobhair, aontaíodh go mba mhaith an rud é dá mbeadh cuid den mhórshiúl i mBaile Átha Cliath ar 15 Feabhra, le cearta teangan a bhaint amach, ag caitheamh éadaí dearga agus bratach á hiompar acu agus “Dearg le Fearg” scríofa uirthi.
Tá sé tábhachtach, dar leis an chruinniú, go dtuigeann daoine go bhfuil fearg ar mhuintir na Gaeltachta fán dóigh ina bhfuil an rialtas ag caitheamh leis an “chéad teanga oifigiúil” mar dheá.
Mar sin de, má tá rún agat bheith ar an mhórshiúl, iarrann muid ort rud inteacht dearg a chaitheamh le do chuid feirge a léiriú.
Bígí linn!

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dearg-le-Fearg/1395029774090787?id=1395029774090787&sk=info

Richardbouvet
14-02-2014, 03:00 PM
can someone please outline (as bearla) what these Irish language rights demands are?

C. Flower
14-02-2014, 03:16 PM
Or give the start time of the protest. :)

Binn Beal
14-02-2014, 08:08 PM
http://www.thejournal.ie/readme/the-governments-attitude-to-the-irish-language-is-a-total-sham-1315756-Feb2014/
I've read this article in The Journal but am still no wiser as to what exactly the grievance is.

C. Flower
15-02-2014, 05:20 PM
A good few hundred were at it, going by the news. Looked lively.

Ogiol
15-02-2014, 06:03 PM
The protest was about the civil service and the current government overtly blocking the implementation of the consensually agreed 20year strategy for the Irish language. Also, there are almost no state services available in the gaeltachtaí. That is a violation of their civil rights.

C. Flower
15-02-2014, 06:11 PM
The protest was about the civil service and the current government overtly blocking the implementation of the consensually agreed 20year strategy for the Irish language. Also, there are almost no state services available in the gaeltachtaí. That is a violation of their civil rights.

Agreed. I was shocked to come across people who couldn't get a trial, or a legal document, in their own first language.

Ogiol
15-02-2014, 06:39 PM
Agreed. I was shocked to come across people who couldn't get a trial, or a legal document, in their own first language.

Nor everyday forms relating to social welfare, tax, running a business, etc. Its a disgrace, but also verging on illegal due to the official languages act 2003. But of course sometimes the state can just ignore its legal obligations.

Another issue would be the availability of state services outside the gaeltacht...

C. Flower
15-02-2014, 07:02 PM
Nor everyday forms relating to social welfare, tax, running a business, etc. Its a disgrace, but also verging on illegal due to the official languages act 2003. But of course sometimes the state can just ignore its legal obligations.

Another issue would be the availability of state services outside the gaeltacht...

Phone calls to Government Departments ?

C. Flower
15-02-2014, 07:02 PM
Does "Citizen.ie" exist in Irish ?

Ogiol
15-02-2014, 07:21 PM
Phone calls to Government Departments ?


Not as a policy (suprise suprise). No legal obligation, though departments are obliged by the act (2003) to put in place a strategy in order to be able to deal with citizens in Irish. Part of the reason why the language commissioner resigned was that the departments were outright refusing to cooperate with him and were openly flouting their statutory obligations.

Does "Citizen.ie" exist in Irish ?

Dont know what that is and it's a dead link when i try and look it up.

C. Flower
15-02-2014, 07:33 PM
Not as a policy (suprise suprise). No legal obligation, though departments are obliged by the act (2003) to put in place a strategy in order to be able to deal with citizens in Irish. Part of the reason why the language commissioner resigned was that the departments were outright refusing to cooperate with him and were openly flouting their statutory obligations.

Dont know what that is and it's a dead link when i try and look it up.

Sorry - it's citizensinformation.ie (http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/). It is the main government online repository to find one's way around rights, services and obligation.

Richardbouvet
15-02-2014, 10:31 PM
The Official Languages Act was an absurd piece of life-support for a dead language. If Irish needs this nonsense to stay alive it does not deserve to do so.

I am fed up with people demanding special treatment because they do not wish to speak English, which is the language everyone born on this island is known to be able to speak fluently.

We need to remove all mention of Official languages from our constitution and leave the matter of languages to the Oireachtas to legislate on.

Lá an Lúbáin
15-02-2014, 10:34 PM
The Official Languages Act was an absurd piece of life-support for a dead language. If Irish needs this nonsense to stay alive it does not deserve to do so.

I am fed up with people demanding special treatment because they do not wish to speak English, which is the language everyone born on this island is known to be able to speak fluently.

We need to remove all mention of Official languages from our constitution and leave the matter of languages to the Oireachtas to legislate on.

It's not a dead language so I'll just ignore the rest of the crap you're spouting. How many times do you [email protected] have to be told that?

C. Flower
15-02-2014, 10:47 PM
434804201965621248

Lá an Lúbáin
15-02-2014, 10:52 PM
434804201965621248

It was shouted from Parnell Square to Molesworth st. Pretty good turn out with a large majority of under 30s conversing in a 'dead language' along the way. Cearta Teanga - Cearta Daonna . Language Rights - Human Rights!

rebellin
16-02-2014, 02:16 AM
Easter Rising 1916 @lrishRepublic
Follow

''Tír gan teanga, tír gan anam.'' A country without a language is a country without a soul.” #

Wonderful poster!

rebellin
16-02-2014, 02:19 AM
What a wonderful poster and slogan! Thanks for posting it.

Ogiol
16-02-2014, 02:27 PM
Sorry - it's citizensinformation.ie (http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/). It is the main government online repository to find one's way around rights, services and obligation.


Just checked that out, I never used it before seems like it could be useful for a lot of people. With regards to irish, the site is a perfect microcosm of its position as defined by the state. Ill explain.

- There is lipservice paid to an gaeilge in the form of a button to see the site in Irish. All good. However, some pages just revert to the english versions.... so the site is not actually all available in Irish, for whatever reason, laziness? ad hoc or dearth of planning? General slackness but typical of the states attitude to irish.

-Second. There is no direct section detailing any rights to use Irish. And THAT is the very point and problem. There simply is no legislation dealing forthright with rights and responsibilities of the state and citizens and the use of Irish. In this aspect we are light-years behind other european countries. Those countries include, Belgium, Spain (various regions) Denmark, Finland, Germany, Poland. What do they have in common?

They all have laws defining the where, when and how of the uses of languages that are not the main official language of the state. Its that simple. Make a law, or hold a referendum and define the who, where, when, how and to what degree can a citizen use Irish in dealing with the state and then the issue is closed. No more fudge. It really is that simple.

C. Flower
16-02-2014, 06:18 PM
Just checked that out, I never used it before seems like it could be useful for a lot of people. With regards to irish, the site is a perfect microcosm of its position as defined by the state. Ill explain.

- There is lipservice paid to an gaeilge in the form of a button to see the site in Irish. All good. However, some pages just revert to the english versions.... so the site is not actually all available in Irish, for whatever reason, laziness? ad hoc or dearth of planning? General slackness but typical of the states attitude to irish.

-Second. There is no direct section detailing any rights to use Irish. And THAT is the very point and problem. There simply is no legislation dealing forthright with rights and responsibilities of the state and citizens and the use of Irish. In this aspect we are light-years behind other european countries. Those countries include, Belgium, Spain (various regions) Denmark, Finland, Germany, Poland. What do they have in common?

They all have laws defining the where, when and how of the uses of languages that are not the main official language of the state. Its that simple. Make a law, or hold a referendum and define the who, where, when, how and to what degree can a citizen use Irish in dealing with the state and then the issue is closed. No more fudge. It really is that simple.

I think that citizensinformation.ie is important because I have always found it to be up to date, clearly worded and reliable. If this one site was got right in Irish, it would go a long way practically to give access to people to services through Irish.

I'm not suggesting it is a substitute for the other things needed, but it is an obvious low-hanging fruit to ask for, with very practical benefits for Irish speakers, and should be doable by Government.

The organisers said there were 10,000 people there yesterday.

http://www.irishcentral.com/news/politics/10000-march-in-support-of-saving-the-Irish-language-in-Dublin.html

Saoirse go Deo
16-02-2014, 07:11 PM
Sorry - it's citizensinformation.ie (http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/). It is the main government online repository to find one's way around rights, services and obligation.

http://www.citizensinformation.ie/ga/

C. Flower
16-02-2014, 07:48 PM
http://www.citizensinformation.ie/ga/

That looks pretty good - the only smallish thing is the "news" - some seem to have irish versions and others not -

http://whatsnew.citizensinformation.ie/2014/02/14/information-on-what-to-do-if-your-water-supply-has-been-disrupted/

Apjp
16-02-2014, 10:05 PM
The Official Languages Act was an absurd piece of life-support for a dead language. If Irish needs this nonsense to stay alive it does not deserve to do so.

I am fed up with people demanding special treatment because they do not wish to speak English, which is the language everyone born on this island is known to be able to speak fluently.

We need to remove all mention of Official languages from our constitution and leave the matter of languages to the Oireachtas to legislate on.

I take it your great grandparents carted the spuds and belted the doors in then.

C. Flower
18-02-2014, 07:01 PM
Dail debate on the Irish Language Commissioner is on now - there's a live stream link here.

http://www.politicalworld.org/showthread.php?15577-This-Week-in-the-Houses-of-the-Oireachtas-17-21-February-2014#.UwOtbs66WSo

Richardbouvet
18-02-2014, 10:29 PM
I am happy to withdraw my statement that Irish is a dead language. I made that out of frustration with the ludicrous Official Languages Act.

In fact, I would very much like to see a living Irish language - as long as it is not imposed on us as an "official" language.

The principal language of the island of Ireland is English. I certainly have not lost my soul.

C. Flower
18-02-2014, 10:49 PM
The loss of Irish was very sudden. Famine, emigration, urbanisation and the English language National Schools all hit in the early/mid 19th century. It must have been traumatic. Moving to a new language at least initially means a much more limited range of communication and expression.

C. Flower
27-02-2014, 09:33 PM
A Supreme Court judgement today of the utmost importance to the legal status of the Irish language.

A man who sought to be tried in Irish, by people who understand Irish, without translation, has been refused (http://www.rte.ie/news/2014/0227/506982-peadar-o-maicin/).

I've had to do with Irish speaking people who labour to communicate in English and cannot hope to get full justice tried in a second tongue.

You could say that immigrants to Ireland who don't have good English are at the same disadvantage, but that would be to say that we give up on Irish as a native tongue.

If the current law and Constitution do not give Irish speakers the right to a trial in Irish, should the law be changed ?

C. Flower
27-02-2014, 09:39 PM
The three judges who came out against the right to an Irish trial it seems to me did so on spurious grounds: Surely the core issue in a trial is the right of the accused person to a fair trial, not the right of various persons to have a jury gig ?


The Supreme Court ruled against him by a four to one majority.

In his judgment, Mr Justice Frank Clarke said that Mr Ó Maicín enjoyed a constitutional right to conduct official business fully in Irish.
But he said that right was not absolute and may have to give way to other considerations.
These included the significant number of people - even in Gaeltacht areas - who would not have sufficient competence in Irish as well as the need to respect the rights of others to use English as an official language and the constitutional imperative that juries be truly representative.
The judge said that in current conditions and even in Gaeltacht areas, it would not be possible to empanel a jury with sufficient competence to conduct an important criminal trial in Irish without a translator, without excluding a significant number of people from the entitlement to sit on the jury.
He said that conferring on Mr Ó Maicín the rights he asserted would result in the exclusion of a significant number of people from the jury panel.
He said this would be constitutionally impermissible and would render such a jury in breach of the constitutional requirement of representativeness.

Ogiol
27-02-2014, 09:50 PM
The three judges who came out against the right to an Irish trial it seems to me did so on spurious grounds: Surely the core issue in a trial is the right of the accused person to a fair trial, not the right of various persons to have a jury gig ?

Apparently in an Irish times article, corroborated by other sources, they have admitted to having an informal screening system for jurors to make sure they speak english. If this is so then why can't there be jurors who speak Irish? This is so shocking on so many levels that there can now be absolutely no doubt that the higher civil servants are actually acting to kill off Irish by banishing it from any official domain (which is key to any languages' survival prospects). This, coupled with political non-action is absolutely disgusting and to me, personally, goes to show how utterly rotten and anti-irish the governing establishment mindset really is.

C. Flower
27-02-2014, 09:58 PM
Apparently in an Irish times article, corroborated by other sources, they have admitted to having an informal screening system for jurors to make sure they speak english. If this is so then why can't there be jurors who speak Irish? This is so shocking on so many levels that there can now be absolutely no doubt that the higher civil servants are actually acting to kill off Irish by banishing it from any official domain (which is key to any languages' survival prospects). This, coupled with political non-action is absolutely disgusting and to me, personally, goes to show how utterly rotten and anti-irish the governing establishment mindset really is.

It is an utter slap in the face to the tens of thousands of people who came out on the streets in Dublin last week.

I would think a very first step in response would be for all of us capable to refuse to deal with public bodies in anything else but Irish.

Ogiol
27-02-2014, 10:11 PM
It is an utter slap in the face to the tens of thousands of people who came out on the streets in Dublin last week.

I would think a very first step in response would be for all of us capable to refuse to deal with public bodies in anything else but Irish.

Slap in the face indeed but as to refusing to deal with the public service unless its in Irish then I think a lot of people would be waiting a very long time for a form.

I would liken this attitude to pathological hatred and intolerance of having Irish in the public domain to that which some posters have shown here. Its an irrational hatred and though these people dont hate Irish itself they do not want to see or hear it anywhere, least of all in public domains. I wonder, have you (and everyone) seen that shocking article in the Limerick Leader last week where a journo demolished the irish language and community to such an extent that she's being taken up for hate speech? Shocking indictment of middle ireland.

C. Flower
27-02-2014, 10:16 PM
Slap in the face indeed but as to refusing to deal with the public service unless its in Irish then I think a lot of people would be waiting a very long time for a form.

I would liken this attitude to pathological hatred and intolerance of having Irish in the public domain to that which some posters have shown here. Its an irrational hatred and though these people dont hate Irish itself they do not want to see or hear it anywhere, least of all in public domains. I wonder, have you (and everyone) seen that shocking article in the Limerick Leader last week where a journo demolished the irish language and community to such an extent that she's being taken up for hate speech? Shocking indictment of middle ireland.

Honest to god, it's enough to get me learning Irish. My standpoint is that of human and national rights.

Taking away the right to be tried in Irish is a breakage with any pretence of language rights and pure mockery of the supposed status of the language.

The idea that there would be any problem finding a competent jury is laughable - of course they could., But a competent judge ?

C. Flower
27-02-2014, 10:20 PM
One of the four judges has some sense:


In his judgment, Mr Justice Hardiman said the State and organs of Government had cast the entire burden of promoting the use of the Irish language on successive generations of school children.

He said apart from that, the actions of the State in relation to the Irish language had been uniformly minimalist and grudging.

The judge also said he did not believe there was any other country in the world in which a citizen would not be entitled to conduct his business before a court in the national and first official language and to be understood directly by such court in that language.

Mr Justice Hardiman also pointed out that there were no legislative provisions requiring a person summoned to serve as a juror to have or demonstrate competence in either of the official languages of the State - Irish or English.
He said this was an extraordinary state of affairs and required urgent legislative attention.

Ogiol
27-02-2014, 10:33 PM
One of the four judges has some sense:

You're right at least 1 judge seems to have sense. Though from a legal perspective, I'm surprised that being the first official language doesn't confer other rights such as a hearing in Irish. Maybe this would be down to jurisprudence, I'm not sure. If so, then there is a big fat red neon arrow pointing at the judiciary and the continuous cases which have led to a different interpretation. In any case, the solution for those who are for some sort of equal rights is to establish a language rights charter, which may need a referendum, to define the rights of those citizens who want to use Irish in dealing with the state, in all circumstances. On a tangent, I firmly believe that the right to educate your child through Irish should be fundamental to any such bill of rights.

Here's that article (http://www.limerickleader.ie/news/opinion-our-next-storm-is-coming-from-the-gaeltacht-1-5888753) from the limerick paper

C. Flower
27-02-2014, 11:21 PM
You're right at least 1 judge seems to have sense. Though from a legal perspective, I'm surprised that being the first official language doesn't confer other rights such as a hearing in Irish. Maybe this would be down to jurisprudence, I'm not sure. If so, then there is a big fat red neon arrow pointing at the judiciary and the continuous cases which have led to a different interpretation. In any case, the solution for those who are for some sort of equal rights is to establish a language rights charter, which may need a referendum, to define the rights of those citizens who want to use Irish in dealing with the state, in all circumstances. On a tangent, I firmly believe that the right to educate your child through Irish should be fundamental to any such bill of rights.

Here's that article (http://www.limerickleader.ie/news/opinion-our-next-storm-is-coming-from-the-gaeltacht-1-5888753) from the limerick paper

The right to a fair trial is integral to democracy.

I can't begin to say how bad I think this judgement is.

The logic and arguments could be refuted by a 10 year old (in any language): it is political expediency on the part of the judges. to say that a citizen should not get a fair trial.

fluffybiscuits
28-02-2014, 04:48 PM
The three judges who came out against the right to an Irish trial it seems to me did so on spurious grounds: Surely the core issue in a trial is the right of the accused person to a fair trial, not the right of various persons to have a jury gig ?

Thats a case that I foresee ending up in the ECHR

C. Flower
28-02-2014, 05:14 PM
Thats a case that I foresee ending up in the ECHR


You're right. There may already be precedents set there on language rights.

Ogiol
28-02-2014, 05:31 PM
You're right. There may already be precedents set there on language rights.

I read the full judgement of the dissenting judge and he believed that the state, though article 8, was inherently bilingual and therefore should obviously grant the right to a jury/court in Irish. He also rubbished the bit a about 'competition' between english and irish, stating that by giving someone a trial or jury in Irish this in no way interferes with other citizens right to have it in english. (this refers to the exemption in one of the subpoints of that article which allows the state to carry out some work only in english.

Ogiol
28-02-2014, 05:33 PM
I'd just like to point out to readers that this case and this verdict are exactly what the 10,000 people were protesting about in Dublin 2 weeks ago.

C. Flower
28-02-2014, 08:04 PM
I read the full judgement of the dissenting judge and he believed that the state, though article 8, was inherently bilingual and therefore should obviously grant the right to a jury/court in Irish. He also rubbished the bit a about 'competition' between english and irish, stating that by giving someone a trial or jury in Irish this in no way interferes with other citizens right to have it in english. (this refers to the exemption in one of the subpoints of that article which allows the state to carry out some work only in english.

Would you be able to link the Judgement here ?

Article 14 - Non Discrimination - seems to cover it. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belgian_Linguistic_Case_%28No_2%29)

Excuse my French - but the argument made by three of the judges that peoples right to sit on a jury even if they don't understand the first language and a person wants to be tried in it trumps the right of a person to a fair trial (in the national, official, language they use every day) is in my view utter nonsense.

C. Flower
28-02-2014, 08:11 PM
You're right at least 1 judge seems to have sense. Though from a legal perspective, I'm surprised that being the first official language doesn't confer other rights such as a hearing in Irish. Maybe this would be down to jurisprudence, I'm not sure. If so, then there is a big fat red neon arrow pointing at the judiciary and the continuous cases which have led to a different interpretation. In any case, the solution for those who are for some sort of equal rights is to establish a language rights charter, which may need a referendum, to define the rights of those citizens who want to use Irish in dealing with the state, in all circumstances. On a tangent, I firmly believe that the right to educate your child through Irish should be fundamental to any such bill of rights.

Here's that article (http://www.limerickleader.ie/news/opinion-our-next-storm-is-coming-from-the-gaeltacht-1-5888753) from the limerick paper

Hmm. So much wrong with that.

The little hairs on the back of my neck are standing up and telling me that this judgement is a turning point for the Irish language. If it is let stand, we may kiss it goodbye.

Saoirse go Deo
28-02-2014, 08:32 PM
Anything which is of fundamental importance to the Irish people, whether it's cultural, the Irish language, sovereignty, national aspirations, the list goes on, suffers immensely when the gombeen government is entrusted with it. While it is important to have legal backing and state support ordinary people need to take the issue by the scruff of the neck and do what is needed themselves.

C. Flower
28-02-2014, 09:27 PM
Irish is listed by UNESCO as an endangered language.

I'm not sure what this is based on.

Ogiol
01-03-2014, 04:17 PM
Would you be able to link the Judgement here ?

Article 14 - Non Discrimination - seems to cover it. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belgian_Linguistic_Case_%28No_2%29)

Excuse my French - but the argument made by three of the judges that peoples right to sit on a jury even if they don't understand the first language and a person wants to be tried in it trumps the right of a person to a fair trial (in the national, official, language they use every day) is in my view utter nonsense.

Here is the judgement (http://www.supremecourt.ie/Judgments.nsf/1b0757edc371032e802572ea0061450e/82b284448f635c7b80257c8c005a45c5?OpenDocument) by Judge Hardiman.

He is scathing with the current situation and lack of statutory definition for the use of Irish.

Here is an article by an sionnach fionn (http://ansionnachfionn.com/2014/02/28/medieval-discrimination-in-a-modern-ireland/) with extensive quotes from the judgement. It explain the case very well in my opinion.

Finally, with regards Saoirse go Deo, to people needing to do it themselves and not rely on government, well that's exatly the state of affairs for the last century. Successive governments have completely abandoned the Irish language to it's own devices and those people protesting out there are trying to change this. They want the government to define the areas where, according to the constitution and Judge Hardiman above, citizen have a right to use our native language while dealing with the state.

Cass, there are many different organisations that 'classify' languages. Irish is endangered in so much as it's area of influence is shrinking (the gaeltachtaí) and it has less and less official protection and presence...

fluffybiscuits
03-03-2014, 10:16 PM
You're right. There may already be precedents set there on language rights.

Carried out a comprehensive search and there is nothing I can find but that is not to say that it doesnt exist. In Irish legislation people are entitled to representation and to be presented with evidence and have it explained to them in a form or manner they understand.


Here is the judgement (http://www.supremecourt.ie/Judgments.nsf/1b0757edc371032e802572ea0061450e/82b284448f635c7b80257c8c005a45c5?OpenDocument) by Judge Hardiman.

He is scathing with the current situation and lack of statutory definition for the use of Irish.

Here is an article by an sionnach fionn (http://ansionnachfionn.com/2014/02/28/medieval-discrimination-in-a-modern-ireland/) with extensive quotes from the judgement. It explain the case very well in my opinion.

Finally, with regards Saoirse go Deo, to people needing to do it themselves and not rely on government, well that's exatly the state of affairs for the last century. Successive governments have completely abandoned the Irish language to it's own devices and those people protesting out there are trying to change this. They want the government to define the areas where, according to the constitution and Judge Hardiman above, citizen have a right to use our native language while dealing with the state.

Cass, there are many different organisations that 'classify' languages. Irish is endangered in so much as it's area of influence is shrinking (the gaeltachtaí) and it has less and less official protection and presence...

It has been mandatory in schools since inception of the state? Government policy is at fault for the poor standard of Irish and its declining influence. Welsh and Hebrew are success stories,the latter in particular.

C. Flower
10-03-2014, 03:28 PM
Further attacks on the Irish language - existing legislation requiring public policy to be published in Irish as well as English proposed for change along with other restrictive measures - one of which seems to allow public agencies to change peoples' names from the Irish to an English version....

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/leaked-document-shows-reversal-of-irish-language-obligations-1.1715246

Ogiol
10-03-2014, 05:25 PM
This is basically a watering down and some more of the Official Languages Act of 2003.

There is another day of protest in Belfast next month. 'An Lá Dearg''. It's on on the 12th of April coming @ 2pm Starting at the Cúltúrlann on Bóthar na bhFál. Buses going from around the country.

Naturally it will be concentrating on similar issues as the last march but with more emphasis on demanding a Language Act in the 6 counties. This language act was promised during the good friday agreement but has subsequently been blocked by the unionist parties.

C. Flower
13-03-2014, 01:00 PM
Statements are being made on the Irish Language Strategy 2020 to the Daíl at the moment. Unfortunately, I can't understand them although it is encouraging how many of the words I know.

http://www.oireachtas.ie/documents/livewebcast/DVR-Flash-Dail.htm

Ogiol
13-03-2014, 01:47 PM
Statements are being made on the Irish Language Strategy 2020 to the Daíl at the moment. Unfortunately, I can't understand them although it is encouraging how many of the words I know.

http://www.oireachtas.ie/documents/livewebcast/DVR-Flash-Dail.htm

Just caught the closing speech by Dinny, unfortunately. I'll get a synopsis later on from somewhere I'm sure. Personally, Dinny should resign, he's done nothing at all but preside and oversee what will be a watering down of the role of Irish in the public service.

Indeed there should be a minister for the gaeltacht and an ghaeilge. Simple as, with responsibility for promotion, reform and implimentation of any strategies. This is the case in other areas where there are 2 official languages...

C. Flower
13-03-2014, 02:30 PM
Just caught the closing speech by Dinny, unfortunately. I'll get a synopsis later on from somewhere I'm sure. Personally, Dinny should resign, he's done nothing at all but preside and oversee what will be a watering down of the role of Irish in the public service.

Indeed there should be a minister for the gaeltacht and an ghaeilge. Simple as, with responsibility for promotion, reform and implimentation of any strategies. This is the case in other areas where there are 2 official languages...

Seems fair, there is a Minister for everything else.

The parts of the debate I've heard are all in Irish. If there is no English discussion, that is a shame, as it makes Irish into a minority topic, which it is not. It's of concern to the whole State and most people want it to succeed whether or not they personally speak it.

PaddyJoe
14-03-2014, 12:16 AM
Leaders Questions in Irish today. Apparently it only happens once a year. Unfortunately the big boys have all headed off for the break and poor old Richard Bruton was left to answer the questions in English.
Interesting to see that simultaneous interpreting was available and several deppities had the headphones on.