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Slim Buddha
07-10-2013, 05:33 AM
I was at a loss to know where to put this but given the economic dogma peddled by the PD´s in government, I put it here.

Dunphy seems to take a certain amount of pride in his role in getting Harney to the top of the pile in the now mercifully defunct PD´s

http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/books-arts/how-eamon-dunphy-got-mary-harney-elected-leader-of-progressive-democrats-29637397.html

To me, this should read more as a confession, given Harney´s central role in the government which destroyed our economy and economic sovereignty.

However, I see no sign of any effort to repent on the part of Dunphy and he clearly does not realise that this action of his is one of which no rational
human being could possibly be proud.

C. Flower
07-10-2013, 08:36 AM
I was at a loss to know where to put this but given the economic dogma peddled by the PD´s in government, I put it here.

Dunphy seems to take a certain amount of pride in his role in getting Harney to the top of the pile in the now mercifully defunct PD´s

http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/books-arts/how-eamon-dunphy-got-mary-harney-elected-leader-of-progressive-democrats-29637397.html

To me, this should read more as a confession, given Harney´s central role in the government which destroyed our economy and economic sovereignty.

However, I see no sign of any effort to repent on the part of Dunphy and he clearly does not realise that this action of his is one of which no rational
human being could possibly be proud.

Well, well. An Indo Opinion Poll done it. Who would have thought it ?


A week before the election Harney asked me to meet her for a drink," Dunphy says in the book. "She told me Cox had the election in the bag. It wouldn't even be close. By Harney's tally, Cox would win 7 to 3."
When they met, Harney told Dunphy that she believed she was more popular than Cox with the public, but that there was a bias against electing a woman leader within the parliamentary party.



According to Dunphy, who was working for this paper at the time, she told him that an opinion poll was her only hope. She asked him if he could persuade Sunday Independent editor Aengus Fanning to commission a poll for the following Sunday, the day before the leadership election.
"Aengus was sceptical," Dunphy writes in the book. "Opinion polls were expensive. A single-issue poll seemed extravagant. I enlisted the help of deputy editor Anne Harris. She backed me. The prospect of the first woman leader of an Irish political party was enticing. It was a good story if the numbers fell right." [In fact, the Sunday Independent carried a full opinion poll, in which the Harney issue was just one of many questions.]
'Pat Cox, the former RTE presenter, was her main challenger.'
Sunday's paper led with the news the public preferred Harney, 67 per cent to 33 per cent. Game over.

Slim Buddha
07-10-2013, 08:45 AM
Well, well. An Indo Opinion Poll done it. Who would have thought it ?

It is Dunphy's tone which I find extraordinary. Five years after the economic Chernobyl into which mainly PD economic policies landed this country (light touch regulation, neoliberalist supply-side economics and markets being supreme) Dunphy recalls this tale with a tone almost approaching pride. Really, if it is true, his tone ought to be one of resounding "mea culpas" and apologetic in the extreme. Mary Harney's ascent to the leadership of the PD's is, in hindsight, one of the most catastrophic events of Ireland's post-independence history.

antiestablishmentarian
07-10-2013, 03:17 PM
It is Dunphy's tone which I find extraordinary. Five years after the economic Chernobyl into which mainly PD economic policies landed this country (light touch regulation, neoliberalist supply-side economics and markets being supreme) Dunphy recalls this tale with a tone almost approaching pride. Really, if it is true, his tone ought to be one of resounding "mea culpas" and apologetic in the extreme. Mary Harney's ascent to the leadership of the PD's is, in hindsight, one of the most catastrophic events of Ireland's post-independence history.

The thing is that while she, her party and her colleagues may be discredited in the eyes of the public, the ideology they peddled of free market fundamentalism is still the ideology of power and the inspiration for austerity policies. The PDs remain historically influential, and highlighting this episode may be Dunphy's way of trying to write himself into the history of that party.

Sent from my GT-S5670 using Tapatalk 2

Slim Buddha
07-10-2013, 04:40 PM
The thing is that while she, her party and her colleagues may be discredited in the eyes of the public, the ideology they peddled of free market fundamentalism is still the ideology of power and the inspiration for austerity policies. The PDs remain historically influential, and highlighting this episode may be Dunphy's way of trying to write himself into the history of that party.

Sent from my GT-S5670 using Tapatalk 2

The PD´s were the true cancer at the heart of the previous administration. Between 1997 and 2004, when McCreevy was shunted to Brussels, the government put through seven doctrinaire PD budgets. It was the PD´s who provided the ideology for a government whose main element, Fianna Fail, were basically an ideology-free zone. But Harney herself was no economist and much of the ideology came from her husband, Brian Geoghegan, who was some sort of bigwig in IBEC before they got married and Harney duly made him Chairman of the country´s premier slush fund, FAS. It seemed at times to be a case of the IBEC flea wagging the PD tail which was in turn wagging the FF dog.
The PD´s were always quick to claim "credit" for the wonderful economic boom were were led to believe that we were enjoying, so it is only right to allocate its fair proportion of blame for the clusterphuq of where we are now.

Mowl
07-10-2013, 06:27 PM
I reckon Dunphy's allowing himself to perform a sliding tackle into a sort of poor man's reverse psychology in that he's feinting a double bluff, lean to the left, dodge to the right - in classic 70's style, which was also roughly the last time he was in any way relevant or topical.

Typical working Dubliner class mentality on show in that he wants to be seen as a mover and a shaker rather than a bland pundit with not much to back up his claims of either worthy moves or reasonable shakes. The man's just trying to sell copy in the only way he can: by bullshitting. He's been a side-liner and last minute substitute his entire career, and like most Dublin bar-stool philosophers, has an extraordinarily jumped-up idea of himself and his place in Irish society. I wouldn't be arsed reading his tome if it was given to me for free.

It'll be in the bargain bins in a matter of weeks anyway, hence the size and volume of his trumpet.

PaddyJoe
07-10-2013, 07:16 PM
I see Dunphy has a story about Haughey tipping off his buddies about sterling devaluation in 1967.

In particular, Dunphy reveals how a source "close to Haughey" explained to him how the politician had been able to buy the Abbeville mansion and estate in Kinsealy, north Dublin.This source told Dunphy that Britain (http://searchtopics.independent.ie/topic/United_Kingdom)'s sterling devaluation in 1967 was the moment when Charlie landed his first big "touch".
In the book, Dunphy writes: "The Irish pound was linked to sterling, so when Harold Wilson (http://searchtopics.independent.ie/topic/Harold_Wilson)'s government decided to devalue on November 18, 1967, the Irish government was given twenty-four hours' notice.
"Charlie was Minister for Finance. He passed the information on to a small group of wealthy Irish businessmen who made a fortune on the currency markets.
"They 'looked after' the Man of Destiny who'd tipped them off.
http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/books-arts/haughey-tipped-off-wealthy-friends-before-sterling-devaluation-claims-dunphy-29639329.html

C. Flower
07-10-2013, 07:43 PM
I see Dunphy has a story about Haughey tipping off his buddies about sterling devaluation in 1967.

http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/books-arts/haughey-tipped-off-wealthy-friends-before-sterling-devaluation-claims-dunphy-29639329.html

This if true is a massive story and we should be asking to hear more about it.

The question has always been in our minds of course as to whether the same thing happened in relation to the Bank Guarantee.

Slim Buddha
07-10-2013, 08:46 PM
This if true is a massive story and we should be asking to hear more about it.

The question has always been in our minds of course as to whether the same thing happened in relation to the Bank Guarantee.

It is not beyond the bound of possibility that such sensitive commercial information got into the hands of those in a position to use that information for personal gain. It was the dominant culture of the Celtic Tiger era. "Do unto others".

I am still baffled by the apparent pride Dunphy shows in his part, as he puts it, in the elevation of Harney to PD leader. With the benefit of hindsight, this is hardly something in which a sane person could possibly take any pride. There are very few politicians in the history of the state whose careers have caused more destruction than that of Harney. The disgrace that is the Irish Health Service is one of her lasting legacies because she was directly involved in its demise. But the insidious cancer of PD economic policies have left their mark all over Ireland, in every walk of life, in every school, factory, hospital, office and home. May we never see Harney or her like again.

C. Flower
07-10-2013, 08:53 PM
It is not beyond the bound of possibility that such sensitive commercial information got into the hands of those in a position to use that information for personal gain. It was the dominant culture of the Celtic Tiger era. "Do unto others".

I am still baffled by the apparent pride Dunphy shows in his part, as he puts it, in the elevation of Harney to PD leader. With the benefit of hindsight, this is hardly something in which a sane person could possibly take any pride. There are very few politicians in the history of the state whose careers have caused more destruction than that of Harney. The disgrace that is the Irish Health Service is one of her lasting legacies because she was directly involved in its demise. But the insidious cancer of PD economic policies have left their mark all over Ireland, in every walk of life, in every school, factory, hospital, office and home. May we never see Harney or her like again.

Harney was only a forerunner of the likes of LaGarde, or Strauss Kahn, whose right wing politics, obscene expenditure and dubious financial interests leave Harney in the ha'penny place.

The main difference is that Harney was visible from day to day, and in our faces.