PDA

View Full Version : 1983 - Britain Begins Move from 30 Year to 20 Year rule for info release - Nuclear Brinkmanship, Sinn Fein favoured by the UK



C. Flower
01-08-2013, 09:58 PM
Annual release by the UK of government classified documents:

1983 was a year in which an extraordinary scheme of nuclear brinkmanship by the US and UK against the USSR was carried out. Reagan ramped spending on nuclear war by a trillion dollars a year, and shattered the resolve of USSR leaders with expressed enthusiasm for a "first strike"

A classified speech by Queen Elizabeth has been released, written as part of an exercise, that appeared to the Russians to be preparation for nuclear war.

The Irish Government wanted to ban Sinn Fein, but the British Government was strongly opposed.

Documents released today -

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/latest-releases.htm


01 August 2013

Hundreds of files from 1983 have been released to The National Archives today as the government begins the ten-year transition to a 20-year rule, down from 30 years, for transfer and release.
Two years' worth of government records will be released every year until 2022 and files from 1984 will be released by December. Read more about the 20-year rule (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/20-year-rule.htm).
The latest files detail the end of Mrs Thatcher's first term in office as victory in the Falklands War helped propel her to a second successive election triumph in June 1983.
At home, the Prime Minister faced an uncertain economic outlook while the US-led invasion of Grenada was one of a number of foreign policy challenges that year. The Cold War became colder with the arrival of American cruise missiles in Greenham Common amid a general deterioration in East-West relations.
View a selection of the newly-released Cabinet Office (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/cab-highlights-1983.htm) and Prime Minister's Office (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/prem-highlights-1983.htm) files, the key events of 1983 (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/events-1983.htm)and changes to the British Cabinet in 1983 (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/british-cabinet-changes-1983.htm).
Listen to our podcast (http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/new-files-from-1983) to hear contemporary records specialists Mark Dunton and Simon Demissie discussing highlights from the latest release and read more about the files on our blog (http://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/blog/new-files-from-1983/).


Far more appears to be available on line than in previous annual releases.

For browsing: -

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/866.htm

Key events of 1983
3 February
Unemployment reaches a record high of 3,224,715.
15 March
The Budget raises tax allowances, and cuts taxes by 2 billion.
1 April
Protestors form a 14-mile human chain in response to the impending arrival of American nuclear weapons at Greenham Common.
6 May
The West German government announces that the so-called 'Hitler Diaries' published by the magazine Stern are forgeries.
9 June
Margaret Thatcher and the Conservative Party are returned for a second term in office with a majority of 144 seats.
7 July
New chancellor Nigel Lawson announces public spending cuts of 500 million.
13 July
MPs vote 368-223 against the reinstatement of the death penalty.
1 September
Korean Air Lines Flight 007 is shot down by the Soviet Union. All 269 on board are killed.
25 September
Maze Prison escape: 38 armed IRA prisoners escape from HM Prison Maze in County Antrim, Northern Ireland in the largest prison escape in British history.
2 October
Neil Kinnock is elected leader of the Labour Party on the retirement of Michael Foot.
7 October
A plan to abolish the Greater London Council (GLC) is announced.
22 October
Over a million people demonstrate against nuclear weapons at a CND march in London.
23 October
Truck bombs explode at a barracks in Beirut killing 300 American and French servicemen in the Multinational Force in Lebanon.
25 October
American forces invade the Commonwealth island of Grenada.
13 November
The first US cruise missiles arrive at RAF Greenham Common amid protests.
15 November
Turkish northern Cyprus unilaterally declares independence.
26 November
In London, 6,800 gold bars worth nearly 26 million are taken from the Brink's-MAT vault at Heathrow Airport.
17 December
An IRA car bomb kills six, three police officers and three members of the public, and injures 91 outside Harrods in London.

Saoirse go Deo
01-08-2013, 10:06 PM
People seem to accepting all these released files as fact - I don't believe any of this is remotely trustworthy.

C. Flower
01-08-2013, 10:09 PM
On British Post War Intelligence and Anti-Communist Propoganda and Action



Latest news (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/newsarchive2013.htm)
News archive (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/news-archive.htm)
Latest document releases (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/latest-releases.htm)
Document releases archive (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/releases-archive.htm)
Free enewsletter (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/enewsletter.htm)

Post-war: Intelligence
'C', Chief of the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS): special operations

Catalogue ref: FO 1093/347 (http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/s/res?_q=FO%201093/347)
Date: 24/01/1946 - 08/07/1946

This file concerns the future of special operations after the war, including a draft Directive sent to the Foreign Office by 'C' on 30 January 1946: 'In time of peace all permitted activities abroad will be subject to the approval and control of the Foreign Office'. Special operations would give 'covert support to British national interests' by 'influencing prominent individuals, disbursing subsidies, countering hostile propaganda and by para-military activities as appropriate'. Priority would be given to those countries, including the Middle East, which were 'likely to be overrun in the early stages of a conflict with Russia'. A circular telegram sent to HM Representatives overseas on 26 March 1946 said the Chiefs of Staff had decided SOE should come to an end as a separate organisation. 'In future there will, therefore, be a single Secret Service and 'C''s local representative will be solely responsible in your country'. There are various revised drafts of the Directive, and a paper setting out Menzies' requirements for planning purposes in accordance with it.
Covert propaganda 1948

Catalogue ref: FO 1093/375 (http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/s/res?_q=FO%201093/375)
Date: 17/12/1947 - 08/10/1948

In January 1948 'C' sent the Foreign Office a paper on 'Special Operations other than clandestine propaganda', suggesting activities that SIS might carry out as 'part of a propaganda campaign or as separate subversive operations against the Russians and Communist Parties'. These included 'framing' diplomats and other officials with planted evidence, penetration of factories and trades unions, sabotaging party meetings with stink bombs, explosive parcels, intimidation, kidnap and even the 'liquidation of selected individuals'. The paper covered other countries threatened by Communism, as well as the Eastern bloc. These proposals led to considerable discussion in the Foreign Office although, as William Hayter pointed out, most of the operations proposed would be contrary to the ministerial ban on subversive operations in satellite countries. The minutes of a meeting recognise that some of the activities may seem 'childish' but would be a 'considerable nuisance to communists'. Other papers include a memo by Sir Norman Brook on Anti-Communist propaganda, produced after a meeting on 12 March 1948 and records of discussions on these issues with the Chiefs of Staff. These deliberations led directly to the establishment of the Foreign Office's Information Research Department (IRD) in 1948.
Relations between the Security Service (MI5) and the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS): memorandum of agreement

Catalogue ref: FO 1093/393 (http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/s/res?_q=FO%201093/393)
Date: 28/03/1949 - 24/12/1949

This file contains discussions on which agency should operate where in the post-war world. It includes a report on 'Relations between the Secret Service (SIS) and the Security Service' by a cross-agency working party, presented to the Director-General of MI5 and 'C' by Guy Liddell, the Deputy-Director General of MI5, on 29 April. 'C' responded in a letter to Sir Percy Sillitoe of 18 May, broadly accepting the report's conclusions but raising several points, underlining the distinction between the Security Service's remit (Commonwealth and Defence tasks) and SIS's (intelligence about foreign powers). In his reply of 23 May, Sillitoe said he thought 'C' was pressing this point 'a little too far', since the Security Service also needed to collect information about foreign countries, for security planning purposes.
By July, the two Services had reached agreement on a Memorandum of Understanding, which included the objective of ultimately sharing a London headquarters. It also stated that the 'employment of secret agents in foreign countries is the exclusive responsibility of SIS, but the Security Service will not in future be ruled out of direct access to foreign security authorities where this is necessary for the purpose of exchanging information and co-ordinating operations'. There is further minuting on the question of joint accommodation for the Agencies, including a note by Strang of points raised by Bevin, including the statement that 'It is important that 'C' should not be chained to his desk. What can we do to liberate him?'
Soviet Union: future intelligence activities

Catalogue ref: FO 1093/447 (http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/s/res?_q=FO%201093/447)
Date: 23/06/1948 - 06/01/1949

In a letter to Sir Orme Sargent of 25 June 1948, 'C' referred to the decision taken by Sir Alec Cadogan in 1945 that 'I might try to penetrate the USSR from the outside, provided that I set up no organisation inside the country'. However 'C' noted that since the USSR was 'the ultimate objective of all my operations, the ban on working inside it has become rather a stumbling block'. He asked for the ban to be relaxed, and this was agreed at a meeting on 12 August 1948. The file also contains examples of political and military intelligence obtained through a conversation with a high-level Soviet official, equivalent in rank to a Colonel-General. Codenamed 'Legris', he provided important intelligence about conditions inside the Soviet Union and the unpopularity of the Soviet regime. He also provided advice on how best to spread anti-Communist propaganda within Russia, including the suggestion that women make news travel fast; what Russian authorities referred to as Saraphan (or pinafore) radio whereby housewives could spread news from city to suburb in a matter of hours.

C. Flower
01-08-2013, 10:13 PM
People seem to accepting all these released files as fact - I don't believe any of this is remotely trustworthy.

It is certainly the case that there was a very aggressive nuclear push by the US against the Soviet Union in 1983. I've read on it extensively and posted on it here and elsewhere in the past.

I think it is the case that there are huge gaps and redactions in what is published, but I think the documents are still worth perusing carefully.

In so far as they tally with what we already know to be fact, they are likely to be factual themselves.

C. Flower
01-08-2013, 10:35 PM
A depressing if worthwhile read - a year of counterrevolution and reaction - invasion of Grenada, nuclear war preparations, anti-union action, privatisation, abolition of the GLC and so on...

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/prem-highlights-1983.htm

Frankie Lee
01-08-2013, 10:46 PM
People seem to accepting all these released files as fact - I don't believe any of this is remotely trustworthy.

Example being that someone in Downing Street believed that Sinn Fein were rigging votes without any evidence, 30 years later RTE news reports it without questioning. Effective smearing.

Saoirse go Deo
01-08-2013, 11:01 PM
It is certainly the case that there was a very aggressive nuclear push by the US against the Soviet Union in 1983. I've read on it extensively and posted on it here and elsewhere in the past.

I think it is the case that there are huge gaps and redactions in what is published, but I think the documents are still worth perusing carefully.

In so far as they tally with what we already know to be fact, they are likely to be factual themselves.

While they are worth looking at you must bear in mind the fact that lies are best hidden between two truths

PaddyJoe
02-08-2013, 12:17 AM
Example being that someone in Downing Street believed that Sinn Fein were rigging votes without any evidence, 30 years later RTE news reports it without questioning. Effective smearing.
I'm sure a special edition of Prime Time is being scheduled to deal with the newly released papers.
On second thoughts given that it's August the punters should be happy enough with the '83 Rolling Back the Years repeat.

PaddyJoe
02-08-2013, 12:37 AM
Spiegel covers a document from a meeting between Thatcher and Helmut Kohl in October 1982 which reveals that Kohl wanted to halve the number of Turks living in Germany.

It was a controversial plan that the newly elected German chancellor, Helmut Kohl, confided to British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher during her visit to Bonn, then the West German capital. "Chancellor Kohl said (...) over the next four years, it would be necessary to reduce the number of Turks in Germany by 50 percent -- but he could not say this publicly yet," state the secret minutes of the meeting dated Oct. 28, 1982.
It adds: "It was impossible for Germany to assimilate the Turks in their present numbers." Only four people were in the room at the time: Kohl, his longtime adviser Horst Teltschik, Thatcher (http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/margaret-thatcher-leaves-behind-an-economic-legacy-that-changed-world-a-893367.html)
http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/secret-minutes-chancellor-kohl-wanted-half-of-turks-out-of-germany-a-914376.html

Count Bobulescu
02-08-2013, 05:13 AM
Annual release by the UK of government classified documents:

1983 was a year in which an extraordinary scheme of nuclear brinkmanship by the US and UK against the USSR was carried out.
Reagan ramped spending on nuclear war by a trillion dollars a year and shattered the resolve of USSR leaders with expressed enthusiasm for a "first strike"

A classified speech by Queen Elizabeth has been released, written as part of an exercise, that appeared to the Russians to be preparation for nuclear war.

The Irish Government wanted to ban Sinn Fein, but the British Government was strongly opposed.

Documents released today -

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/latest-releases.htm



Far more appears to be available on line than in previous annual releases.

For browsing: -

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/866.htm

Key events of 1983


3 February
Unemployment reaches a record high of 3,224,715.
15 March
The Budget raises tax allowances, and cuts taxes by 2 billion.
1 April
Protestors form a 14-mile human chain in response to the impending arrival of American nuclear weapons at Greenham Common.
6 May
The West German government announces that the so-called 'Hitler Diaries' published by the magazine Stern are forgeries.
9 June
Margaret Thatcher and the Conservative Party are returned for a second term in office with a majority of 144 seats.
7 July
New chancellor Nigel Lawson announces public spending cuts of 500 million.
13 July
MPs vote 368-223 against the reinstatement of the death penalty.
1 September
Korean Air Lines Flight 007 is shot down by the Soviet Union. All 269 on board are killed.
25 September
Maze Prison escape: 38 armed IRA prisoners escape from HM Prison Maze in County Antrim, Northern Ireland in the largest prison escape in British history.
2 October
Neil Kinnock is elected leader of the Labour Party on the retirement of Michael Foot.
7 October
A plan to abolish the Greater London Council (GLC) is announced.
22 October
Over a million people demonstrate against nuclear weapons at a CND march in London.
23 October
Truck bombs explode at a barracks in Beirut killing 300 American and French servicemen in the Multinational Force in Lebanon.
25 October
American forces invade the Commonwealth island of Grenada.
13 November
The first US cruise missiles arrive at RAF Greenham Common amid protests.
15 November
Turkish northern Cyprus unilaterally declares independence.
26 November
In London, 6,800 gold bars worth nearly 26 million are taken from the Brink's-MAT vault at Heathrow Airport.
17 December
An IRA car bomb kills six, three police officers and three members of the public, and injures 91 outside Harrods in London.


Reagan ramped spending on nuclear war by a trillion dollars a year,

That's an increase, (over and above existing spending), of a trillion a year. That seems far fetched. What's your source for this figure of a trillion dollars a year increase? And for how many years?