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View Full Version : Tories publicly embarrass themselves - is it the beginning of the end?



fluffybiscuits
25-03-2013, 03:49 PM
In recent days Boris Johnson got thrown to the lions on the BBC when an interview with him went completely against him. Johnson has said that he 'sandpapered' quotes when he was a journalist and other alleged incidents which were discussed during the course of the interview. Constantly fudging in his seat, he squirms when the questions are put to him and moves uncomfortably . This was not so much an ambush but a direct line of questioning to get Johnson to give some straight answers. The highlight of the interview was for me personally when Andrew Marr said to Johnson "You're a nasty piece of work, aren't you?" . Read the link below and the video that accompanies it, its three minutes long and well worth the watch.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2013/mar/24/boris-johnson-interview-eddie-mair

This is not the only screw up however. Johnson is something of a funny figure in the Tory circles I can imagine but he is not the only one embarassing himself in the public eye. Jeremy Hunt, the secretary for health contradicted claims by Cameron on the cost of treating patients from within the EEA . Camerons spokesman said that the NHS should recoup £10-£20m it spent on treating said patients only for Hunt later on to speculate that the figure may be around £200m, a vast difference .

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2013/mar/25/david-cameron-immigration-speech-trouble

This wont be the end of the Tories but it might be the start of it. The arse does not know what elbow is doing, are they cracking under pressure? Is there infighting?

Ceannaire
25-03-2013, 06:09 PM
No it won't be the end, nor the beginning of the end, for the Tories. If there is one thing that impresses me about them it's how they are as coldly ruthless when it comes to their own kind as they are in targeting the British working class. If anyone becomes a liability they will be disposed of without a second thought, to preserve the party. They've knifed half their leaders in the last fifty years: Duncan-Smith, Thatcher, Heath and Douglas-Home. Cameron could well be dethroned yet.


There is some anger about same-sex marriage being forced on them by Cameron, but there is no infighting to compare with the last two big periods of internecine conflict in the Conservative Party: the Drys v. the Wets in the early 1980s culminating in the victory of the Drys and the Eurosceptics v. the Europhiles, which was the most toxic for the party but ultimately culminated in victory for the Eurosceptics.


They are doing relatively well in the polls for a party which lost the election, has an incredibly unpopular chancellor, and has actually driven up the national debt whilst pauperising the British people. Thatcher frequently trailed Labour in the polls in the 1980s by margins similar to the ones we're witnessing today and then went on to win on election day. It's concerning that Labour is being so timid in challenging the government, for example, the way Labour MPs were pressured into abstaining on the vote on paying conpensation to the victims of the illegal "Workfare" scheme. The party is chronically afraid of being seen as on the side of the "scrounger", like the thousands of jobseekers who have had their dole stopped not because they weren't looking hard enough for work, but to meet Departmental targets. It's a massive scandal, but where is Labour's voice? They've also started taking a "tougher" (i.e., more xenophobic) line on immigration. They need to assert themselves and tackle the corrupt ideology motivating the cuts itself.

Dr. FIVE
25-03-2013, 06:28 PM
Labour are hand in glove with austerity

jmcc
25-03-2013, 06:55 PM
Somehow I think that Boris might take over from Cameron. Labour are in real trouble as there seems to be a battle between the Tories and UKIP over the immigration issue. Labour is trying to backtrack now with apologies and "proposals" but it may not be enough. BTW it is Eddie Mair that was the interviewer rather than Andrew Marr.

Regards...jmcc

Ceannaire
25-03-2013, 07:01 PM
The fact that he is being attacked by the ultimate bogeyman of the Conservative Party, the BBC, will probably only shore up support for him inside the party. It will be interesting to see whether this has an impact in the public perception of him. People can be surprisingly tolerant of politicians' personal foibles as long as it has no impact on them.

Dr. FIVE
25-03-2013, 07:04 PM
well there was nothing not already in the public domain

Ceannaire
25-03-2013, 07:31 PM
That's true. However, it is often media highlighting of issues that makes people aware of them, as most people do not research the backgrounds of politicians in detail before making a decision as to whether or not to vote for them. Remember Willie O'Dea's perjury case a few years ago? That was in the public domain for months before the media picked up on it, thereby making it an issue.

Slim Buddha
25-03-2013, 08:55 PM
Johnson is not the Bullingdon Club buffoon of popular perception. He won the mayoral election in Labour territory twice against a man who was seen as a life incumbent. Johnson“s head boy image is so carefully manipulated to present him as somehow apolitical while retaining the DNA of a committed Tory. However, his schtick is working because people who dislike him find it hard to criticise him.

Dojo
25-03-2013, 09:43 PM
Labour are hand in glove with austerity

And that's relevant to the Tories HOW?

Ceannaire
25-03-2013, 10:24 PM
Theresa May would be a better choice for them in many respects. She comes from a more modest background. Although Johnson's background isn't anywhere near as rich as Cameron's, the whole Eton/Bullington thing does a lot of damage to the Conservative Party's image. They claim to be on the side of the "striver", yet it sounds absurd to hear that coming from someone of inherited wealth like Cameron. Thatcher's whole "greengrocer's daughter" routine was a big part of her personal appeal. It allowed her implement a reactionary agenda whilst at the same time claiming to identify with the "striver" and the little guy.


May's more steady image would serve the Tories better. Whilst Johnsohn's carefully-crafted bumbling image may benefit him in a job like mayor of London with limited real power, people would likely tire of it were he in charge of the country, and as he faces inevitable controversies may even make it easier for his competence to be questioned than in the case of another politician.

Dr. FIVE
25-03-2013, 10:31 PM
Could very likely be May. Easily the most capable or devious depending on what spin you want to put on it.

Dojo, response to Ceannaire asking where is Labour's voice

fluffybiscuits
26-03-2013, 11:01 AM
Somehow I think that Boris might take over from Cameron. Labour are in real trouble as there seems to be a battle between the Tories and UKIP over the immigration issue. Labour is trying to backtrack now with apologies and "proposals" but it may not be enough. BTW it is Eddie Mair that was the interviewer rather than Andrew Marr.

Regards...jmcc


No it won't be the end, nor the beginning of the end, for the Tories. If there is one thing that impresses me about them it's how they are as coldly ruthless when it comes to their own kind as they are in targeting the British working class. If anyone becomes a liability they will be disposed of without a second thought, to preserve the party. They've knifed half their leaders in the last fifty years: Duncan-Smith, Thatcher, Heath and Douglas-Home. Cameron could well be dethroned yet.


There is some anger about same-sex marriage being forced on them by Cameron, but there is no infighting to compare with the last two big periods of internecine conflict in the Conservative Party: the Drys v. the Wets in the early 1980s culminating in the victory of the Drys and the Eurosceptics v. the Europhiles, which was the most toxic for the party but ultimately culminated in victory for the Eurosceptics.


They are doing relatively well in the polls for a party which lost the election, has an incredibly unpopular chancellor, and has actually driven up the national debt whilst pauperising the British people. Thatcher frequently trailed Labour in the polls in the 1980s by margins similar to the ones we're witnessing today and then went on to win on election day. It's concerning that Labour is being so timid in challenging the government, for example, the way Labour MPs were pressured into abstaining on the vote on paying conpensation to the victims of the illegal "Workfare" scheme. The party is chronically afraid of being seen as on the side of the "scrounger", like the thousands of jobseekers who have had their dole stopped not because they weren't looking hard enough for work, but to meet Departmental targets. It's a massive scandal, but where is Labour's voice? They've also started taking a "tougher" (i.e., more xenophobic) line on immigration. They need to assert themselves and tackle the corrupt ideology motivating the cuts itself.


The fact that he is being attacked by the ultimate bogeyman of the Conservative Party, the BBC, will probably only shore up support for him inside the party. It will be interesting to see whether this has an impact in the public perception of him. People can be surprisingly tolerant of politicians' personal foibles as long as it has no impact on them.


Johnson is not the Bullingdon Club buffoon of popular perception. He won the mayoral election in Labour territory twice against a man who was seen as a life incumbent. Johnson“s head boy image is so carefully manipulated to present him as somehow apolitical while retaining the DNA of a committed Tory. However, his schtick is working because people who dislike him find it hard to criticise him.

Tories have it in majorly over the issue of same sex marriage. Its an issue which goes against their conservative bones and it being foisted upon them is not going to be taken too well. My opinion was Johnson was made mayor as they wanted to keep him at arms length, give him enough rope and let him hang himself. All of the above I would have taken to mean that there is a lot of infighting and the issue with UKIP snapping at their heals would have put some pressure to bear on the Tories.

fluffybiscuits
28-03-2013, 11:38 AM
http://johnnyvoid.wordpress.com/2013/03/27/jobcentre-illegally-sacked-thousands-of-workers/

Another embarrasement for the Tories. Job Centre staff who were illegally sacked brought a case to a tribunal that ruled they should have received redundancy. Ian Duncan Smith , the work and pensions secretary has been forced into a corner now

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2013/mar/27/ian-duncan-smith-branded-ratbag


He was also labelled a 'ratbag' on a recent visit to Scotland..

Andrew49
03-04-2013, 03:39 PM
Edwina Currie walks into it:

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c135/theknitter/53_zps1a942d41.jpg

Some other Tory from the Thatcher era actually lived on the dole for a week and said it wasn't a problem - that the welfare rate he was getting was adequate - it was soon revealed that he struggled very badly on £27 for that week and eventually admitted that living on the dole was a threadbare and meagre existence!

fluffybiscuits
05-04-2013, 11:31 AM
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/andy-mcsmiths-diary-another-tory-mp-redfaced-after-accidental-porn-tweet-8558653.html


The lurid mix of a Twitter, pornography and a Tory MP has struck again, though this time the MP is not to blame. Rob Wilson, MP for Reading East, was making a point about David Bennett, the market trader who challenged Iain Duncan Smith to live off £53 a week, though his weekly income is not £53 as he implied, but £156. To help spread the message, Rob Wilson tweeted using a link supplied by someone at Conservative headquarters. Unfortunately, because of what the Tories euphemistically call a "technical hitch", the link users to a hard core pornography site.