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View Full Version : Ikea pulls cakes after 'fecal matter' bacteria found.



Andrew49
05-03-2013, 10:45 PM
SWEDISH furniture giant Ikea has pulled a batch of almond cakes from its restaurants in 23 countries after Chinese authorities said they contained coliform bacteria, normally present in faecal matter. The Swedish-made cakes had failed tests "for containing an excessive level of coliform bacteria, according to the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine," the Shanghai Daily website wrote.

SOurce (http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/world/ikea-pulls-cakes-after-bacteria-found/story-e6frfkui-1226591147429)

Baron von Biffo
05-03-2013, 10:53 PM
But was it horse ****?

PaddyJoe
05-03-2013, 10:57 PM
And you thought only their furniture was ****;)

Sorry, I'll get me coat:o

C. Flower
05-03-2013, 10:57 PM
But was it horse ****?

lol!

Ogiol
05-03-2013, 11:00 PM
Back to local grown produce and local markets. Its the only way. And really frustrating how in ireland, compared to the continent, there are no fekin markets that arent ''super''

Baron von Biffo
05-03-2013, 11:08 PM
http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m9648noKt01revo57o1_1280.jpg

Dinner and dessert from Ikea.

Jolly Green Giant
06-03-2013, 01:21 AM
Back to local grown produce and local markets. Its the only way. And really frustrating how in ireland, compared to the continent, there are no fekin markets that arent ''super''

Or they call themselves farmers markets who seem to cater for consumers from upper middle class incomes selling cheese, meat, jams, chutneys and produce that could be organic or Irish or maybe not, it's so vaguely labelled.

Ephilant
06-03-2013, 07:04 AM
Or they call themselves farmers markets who seem to cater for consumers from upper middle class incomes selling cheese, meat, jams, chutneys and produce that could be organic or Irish or maybe not, it's so vaguely labelled.

Many, many years ago I briefly worked for a guy in Ireland who imported lots of "organic" stuff. The "organic" aspect of things depended mainly on whether a certain fee was paid or not. The trick was, it got packed in smaller units in Ireland, and he had an "Irish" licence... Most of his stuff was imported from the UK and The Netherlands, and went back out to the UK as "Irish Organic Produce".
Another bureaucratic scam, while those who actually grow their own stuff and do care about what they and other eat have life made impossible because they don't have the necessary "licenses". At some stage the guy actually sold "Organic Garden Fertilizer", to us then known as "GHS; Golden Horse-*****".
The system is however only too happy, for a price of course, to accomodate scams like "Healing Organic Willow Water" and the ever popular magic "Noni Juice" etc. Modern day snake-oil salesmen can indeed thrive. Providing they pay for the licence, our governments will happily accomodate them.

C. Flower
06-03-2013, 07:21 AM
It is amazing to think of that fecal matter with accompanying coliform bacteria travelling to 23 different countries. Modern food supply chains are long in two respects - distance travelled, and the number of links in the chain - each ingredient maybe having changed hands and to some degree packaged and processed each time. The same way that modern cars are made. It is this that has made the origin of horse meat in a burger such a complex matter to pursue.

A senior person in the U.K. Food Safety authority explained it very clearly on RTE one day and said that the problem is that food is made to make profit, not to provide people with a safe and healthy diet. There is a constant tension between the two. To make profit, food is adulterated, and produced with the cheapest possible ingredients, and dressed up with flavour enhancers, preservatives and colourings etc. Things are produced in bulk for economies of scale. Against that, there is customer preference, and regulation. Under different pressures, people trade off time for money and buy fast food.

Food, catching and gathering it, preparing and eating it, used to be more or less the entire business of humankind. Now it is thrown from fridge to microwave to plate, along with whatever it has picked up on the way in a few minutes.

The rich, as JRG says, go for local, hand made, sometimes organic, slow food, because they can afford it, and it is delicious.

Making and gathering food for oneself can still be done, but it is very time consuming and the amount of local ingredients available can be very limited. Growing for oneself is also very time consuming, and is often much more expensive than buying in a supermarket.

fluffybiscuits
06-03-2013, 10:57 AM
It is amazing to think of that fecal matter with accompanying coliform bacteria travelling to 23 different countries. Modern food supply chains are long in two respects - distance travelled, and the number of links in the chain - each ingredient maybe having changed hands and to some degree packaged and processed each time. The same way that modern cars are made. It is this that has made the origin of horse meat in a burger such a complex matter to pursue.

A senior person in the U.K. Food Safety authority explained it very clearly on RTE one day and said that the problem is that food is made to make profit, not to provide people with a safe and healthy diet. There is a constant tension between the two. To make profit, food is adulterated, and produced with the cheapest possible ingredients, and dressed up with flavour enhancers, preservatives and colourings etc. Things are produced in bulk for economies of scale. Against that, there is customer preference, and regulation. Under different pressures, people trade off time for money and buy fast food.

Food, catching and gathering it, preparing and eating it, used to be more or less the entire business of humankind. Now it is thrown from fridge to microwave to plate, along with whatever it has picked up on the way in a few minutes.

The rich, as JRG says, go for local, hand made, sometimes organic, slow food, because they can afford it, and it is delicious.

Making and gathering food for oneself can still be done, but it is very time consuming and the amount of local ingredients available can be very limited. Growing for oneself is also very time consuming, and is often much more expensive than buying in a supermarket.

Simons blog is a good resource.

A lot of inner city communities now have allotments which allow people to grow their own produce locally but they have to pay a fee to rent them.

In talking of that I feel queasy now as I had that almond cake a couple of weeks ago from Ikea!!

Ephilant
06-03-2013, 10:20 PM
In talking of that I feel queasy now as I had that almond cake a couple of weeks ago from Ikea!!

Serves you right. Ask for ****, and thou shall receive it....:D

fluffybiscuits
07-03-2013, 03:03 PM
Serves you right. Ask for ****, and thou shall receive it....:D

its not flat packed, its shat packed :D