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fluffybiscuits
24-01-2013, 05:06 PM
There will be a protest this Saturday against the presence of a british army pipe band playing in Temple Bar Dublin at the tourist orientated 'Tradfest'. This weekend is the anniversary of Bloody Sunday where the british army murdered the innocents in Derry. british soldiers are not welcome in any part of Ireland.This is an obvious attempt by the pro-partitionist state to normalise British imperialism in Ireland.
We would call on anybody who objects to this to join the protest on Saturday and show these murderous thugs just how welcome they are. Beir Bua

Time will be announced shortly

http://www.indymedia.ie/article/103195

In poor taste for the organisers to invite them over that particular weekend considering the hostilities the British army are involved in. Insensitive in the least.

Richardbouvet
24-01-2013, 05:09 PM
Rubbish. Let them play.

fluffybiscuits
24-01-2013, 05:13 PM
Rubbish. Let them play.


I dont believe in giving a platform to any army...

C. Flower
24-01-2013, 06:42 PM
These things aren't accidental.

If we are going to be their wind energy source, it is only a matter of time before we see a lot more of them.

Apjp
24-01-2013, 08:10 PM
They are looking at subsuming us back into the UK. I am starting to give real credence to the theories put out by Captain Con after the Queen's visit. Must be making a contingency plan for the loss of Scotland.

C. Flower
24-01-2013, 08:39 PM
They are looking at subsuming us back into the UK. I am starting to give real credence to the theories put out by Captain Con after the Queen's visit. Must be making a contingency plan for the loss of Scotland.

Stranger things have happened.

Holly
24-01-2013, 09:48 PM
It is asking for trouble to have the British Army in Dublin.

Fraxinus
24-01-2013, 09:56 PM
I think the musicians from Oliver's Army would be much better out in Helmand playing a lament for the recently departed "Captain Wales"....orToff Gun to his mates.

fluffybiscuits
25-01-2013, 12:20 AM
http://www.facebook.com/TempleBarTradFest?filter=2

Google cache shows a few negative comments but nothing on the page...

Simonsays
25-01-2013, 12:32 AM
http://www.indymedia.ie/article/103195

In poor taste for the organisers to invite them over that particular weekend considering the hostilities the British army are involved in. Insensitive in the least.

Why?

fluffybiscuits
25-01-2013, 12:38 AM
Why?

The symbolism a lot of people attach to such events will no doubt stir emotion. The British army have a role to play in protecting Britian, in its own borders some how any normalisation of them through their music or showing a funny side of them paints them in a decent light when nothing could be further from the truth. From Afghanistan to Iraq they are an occupying force. The Republicans have their knickers in a twist and for once Im inclined to agree with them. Its like letting the KKK to stand up and sing about white power.

Im familiar buddy with your opinions on Republicanism, a lot of which I would share but this is galling for me. Its in my own back yard...

Simonsays
25-01-2013, 01:12 AM
The symbolism a lot of people attach to such events will no doubt stir emotion.

Not a lot. A few who shout a lot.


The British army have a role to play in protecting Britian, in its own borders some how any normalisation of them through their music or showing a funny side of them paints them in a decent light when nothing could be further from the truth. From Afghanistan to Iraq they are an occupying force. The Republicans have their knickers in a twist and for once Im inclined to agree with them. Its like letting the KKK to stand up and sing about white power.

Im familiar buddy with your opinions on Republicanism, a lot of which I would share but this is galling for me. Its in my own back yard...

Bands from armies all around the world visit all the time. British army bands visit Ireland all the time. So do American army bands, French army bands, Canadian army bands, Australian army bands. So do police force bands all the time. And our army number 1 band goes on visits to the UK and all around the world also.

Soviet army bands visited Ireland numerous times at the height of the Cold War.

In many armies, army bands aren't even active soldiers. Professional musicians join the army simply to play music, just as professional musicians join police forces to play in police bands and aren't involved in policing. Quite a number of the garda band, for example, were people involved in other bands such as the Artane Boys Band and simply joined the Gardaí on the understanding that they were to be professional musicians.

I remember the events of Bloody Sunday well. I know victims' families. My best friend in from Derry. I remember the wave of national revulsion that swept over Ireland because of the mass murder committed. I remember as a kid learning all the Republican songs of the period - I can still sing "The Men behind the Wire" and "Rubber Bullets for the ladies".

But the vast majority of people on the island, including the vast majority of both communities in the North, no longer spend their times looking for things to be offended by and no longer read the most paranoid offensive possible interpretation to everything.

I do oppose much British military policy in the last decade, but I think getting worked up over bands playing music is overreacting. Bands exist because of an accident of history - how music was a feature of the structured warfare of past centuries, and some fantastic military marching music was composed. Whatever about the sense of protesting about visits of British policy makers who decided on wars, IMHO it is way over the top to start blaming military bands for policies they have no say in, that many military bands play no active part in, and where the bands are going to places that they were invited to.

Holly
25-01-2013, 02:14 AM
... Bands from armies all around the world visit all the time. British army bands visit Ireland all the time. So do American army bands, French army bands, Canadian army bands, Australian army bands. So do police force bands all the time.
... Soviet army bands visited Ireland numerous times at the height of the Cold War.

Really? This is news to me.

Did a military band from the GDR ever visit Ireland, do you know? That would have been an interesting sight marching down O'Connell Street.

East German Military Parade 1989 Ehrenparade der NVA 1949 1989 Part 3 of 6 - YouTube

fluffybiscuits
25-01-2013, 11:49 AM
Not a lot. A few who shout a lot.



Bands from armies all around the world visit all the time. British army bands visit Ireland all the time. So do American army bands, French army bands, Canadian army bands, Australian army bands. So do police force bands all the time. And our army number 1 band goes on visits to the UK and all around the world also.

Soviet army bands visited Ireland numerous times at the height of the Cold War.

In many armies, army bands aren't even active soldiers. Professional musicians join the army simply to play music, just as professional musicians join police forces to play in police bands and aren't involved in policing. Quite a number of the garda band, for example, were people involved in other bands such as the Artane Boys Band and simply joined the Gardaí on the understanding that they were to be professional musicians.

I remember the events of Bloody Sunday well. I know victims' families. My best friend in from Derry. I remember the wave of national revulsion that swept over Ireland because of the mass murder committed. I remember as a kid learning all the Republican songs of the period - I can still sing "The Men behind the Wire" and "Rubber Bullets for the ladies".

But the vast majority of people on the island, including the vast majority of both communities in the North, no longer spend their times looking for things to be offended by and no longer read the most paranoid offensive possible interpretation to everything.

I do oppose much British military policy in the last decade, but I think getting worked up over bands playing music is overreacting. Bands exist because of an accident of history - how music was a feature of the structured warfare of past centuries, and some fantastic military marching music was composed. Whatever about the sense of protesting about visits of British policy makers who decided on wars, IMHO it is way over the top to start blaming military bands for policies they have no say in, that many military bands play no active part in, and where the bands are going to places that they were invited to.

The same issue would apply if there was the American army pipe band playing, we do not give a platform to such groups and this would also extend to if members of the IRA were playing at such an event. Would you give a platform to far right groups of fascists? Its an acceptance of violence used by a group. People whom are in such bands if they had any modicum of decency and leave the army. If my workplace started killing or maiming others, it would be bye bye job. I ahve some principles.

C. Flower
25-01-2013, 02:53 PM
Not a lot. A few who shout a lot.



Bands from armies all around the world visit all the time. British army bands visit Ireland all the time. So do American army bands, French army bands, Canadian army bands, Australian army bands. So do police force bands all the time. And our army number 1 band goes on visits to the UK and all around the world also.

Soviet army bands visited Ireland numerous times at the height of the Cold War.

In many armies, army bands aren't even active soldiers. Professional musicians join the army simply to play music, just as professional musicians join police forces to play in police bands and aren't involved in policing. Quite a number of the garda band, for example, were people involved in other bands such as the Artane Boys Band and simply joined the Gardaí on the understanding that they were to be professional musicians.

I remember the events of Bloody Sunday well. I know victims' families. My best friend in from Derry. I remember the wave of national revulsion that swept over Ireland because of the mass murder committed. I remember as a kid learning all the Republican songs of the period - I can still sing "The Men behind the Wire" and "Rubber Bullets for the ladies".

But the vast majority of people on the island, including the vast majority of both communities in the North, no longer spend their times looking for things to be offended by and no longer read the most paranoid offensive possible interpretation to everything.

I do oppose much British military policy in the last decade, but I think getting worked up over bands playing music is overreacting. Bands exist because of an accident of history - how music was a feature of the structured warfare of past centuries, and some fantastic military marching music was composed. Whatever about the sense of protesting about visits of British policy makers who decided on wars, IMHO it is way over the top to start blaming military bands for policies they have no say in, that many military bands play no active part in, and where the bands are going to places that they were invited to.

Of course military bands operate according to the military policy of their army. They are not on some kind of a freetime junket here.

In the last five years in the U.K., increasingly military bands and parades have been used by the British Government as pro war propoganda and as part of a general militarisation and acclimatisation of a society in which the armed bodies of the State play a greater role.

Army bands marching through British village and city streets and around football stadiums is something that hadn't been seen for many decades.

This is all part of a softening up process.

Ogiol
25-01-2013, 04:27 PM
Not a lot. A few who shout a lot.



Bands from armies all around the world visit all the time. British army bands visit Ireland all the time. So do American army bands, French army bands, Canadian army bands, Australian army bands. So do police force bands all the time. And our army number 1 band goes on visits to the UK and all around the world also.

Soviet army bands visited Ireland numerous times at the height of the Cold War.

In many armies, army bands aren't even active soldiers. Professional musicians join the army simply to play music, just as professional musicians join police forces to play in police bands and aren't involved in policing. Quite a number of the garda band, for example, were people involved in other bands such as the Artane Boys Band and simply joined the Gardaí on the understanding that they were to be professional musicians.

I remember the events of Bloody Sunday well. I know victims' families. My best friend in from Derry. I remember the wave of national revulsion that swept over Ireland because of the mass murder committed. I remember as a kid learning all the Republican songs of the period - I can still sing "The Men behind the Wire" and "Rubber Bullets for the ladies".

But the vast majority of people on the island, including the vast majority of both communities in the North, no longer spend their times looking for things to be offended by and no longer read the most paranoid offensive possible interpretation to everything.

I do oppose much British military policy in the last decade, but I think getting worked up over bands playing music is overreacting. Bands exist because of an accident of history - how music was a feature of the structured warfare of past centuries, and some fantastic military marching music was composed. Whatever about the sense of protesting about visits of British policy makers who decided on wars, IMHO it is way over the top to start blaming military bands for policies they have no say in, that many military bands play no active part in, and where the bands are going to places that they were invited to.


Of course military bands operate according to the military policy of their army. They are not on some kind of a freetime junket here.

In the last five years in the U.K., increasingly military bands and parades have been used by the British Government as pro war propoganda and as part of a general militarisation and acclimatisation of a society in which the armed bodies of the State play a greater role.

Army bands marching through British village and city streets and around football stadiums is something that hadn't been seen for many decades.

This is all part of a softening up process.

Its a studied policy to improve the image of the army and promote militarism. If it was an event organised by the irish army inviting other army bands well that would be fine. Its not though, and its part of a strategy by the brits and our very own 5 column. This is a coordinated plan, no doubt about it and it should be nipped in the bud and not cryed off as if theyre only a band.

They are military members. Full stop. Saying that they dont know what that entails is just bolloxology. If you join the army you know what youre getting into.

And passing over the fact that its a british army is just obfuscating. Nor the Soviets, Canadians, U.S., or any other army is occupying 6 counties of ireland, nor have any other army in history carried out atrocities on this island. Ethnic cleansing and general murder, be it bloody sunday or a whole litany of other murders were all carried out by the same army this band are from!

Does that matter? Yes. Is it just looking to be annoyed by any little thing? No. Its historical and political perspective.