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C. Flower
08-11-2012, 06:59 PM
Welcome to the brave new world of the Programme - people who can't or won't pay water bills to have their supply cut at some times of day, or water pressure reduced so that washing machines won't work. :(

http://www.independent.ie/national-news/water-ration-plan-for-those-who-refuse-to-pay-utility-bills-3286120.html

Count Bobulescu
08-11-2012, 07:17 PM
Looked at from the US, or Europe, or even parts of the developing world, the notion of free water seems quaint.


If you’re one of the 4.5 million people who live in Ireland, you pay no water bill.
Municipal water is free, no matter how much you use. And no one knows how much you use — not even you.

Ireland has no water meters and no water bills.

In fact, Ireland is the only country in Europe with no water meters. Indeed, Hanoi has water meters, and Mexico City and Delhi. Just not Dublin.
Without any data on consumption, without any pricing, there’s also no economics of water use in Ireland.

For those who think charging for water has no impact on how people use and manage it, two facts leap out from a just-released Irish government report on water:

• Per person water use in Ireland is about 37,000 gallons a year — between two and three times the average for the rest of Europe. (Per person water use in Ireland is almost identical to that in the U.S. — but the U.S. has one of the highest per person water use rates in the world.)

• Irish water utilities leak an astonishing 41 percent of the water they pump before the water reaches any customer, more than twice the leak rate in the U.K. or the U.S.

http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2012/02/10/ireland-charge-for-water/

C. Flower
08-11-2012, 07:35 PM
Looked at from the US, or Europe, or even parts of the developing world, the notion of free water seems quaint.

http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2012/02/10/ireland-charge-for-water/

There is a cost to providing a water supply, that goes without saying.

Most European countries, until Thatcherism, treated water as a public good, not a commodity. Paid for by taxation, one way or another, but with the assumption that it should be accessible / affordable for all. Some countries that started the privatisation route followed in the U.K. then reversed it.

http://www.publicpolicy.ie/wp-content/uploads/Water-for-Poor-People-Lessons-from-France-Belgium.pdf

Count Bobulescu
08-11-2012, 07:58 PM
There is a cost to providing a water supply, that goes without saying.

Most European countries, until Thatcherism, treated water as a public good, not a commodity. Paid for by taxation, one way or another, but with the assumption that it should be accessible / affordable for all. Some countries that started the privatisation route followed in the U.K. then reversed it.

http://www.publicpolicy.ie/wp-content/uploads/Water-for-Poor-People-Lessons-from-France-Belgium.pdf
Charging for water doesn’t need to equate to privatization. Most water utilities (unlike gas or electricity) in the US are publicly owned.

Ephilant
08-11-2012, 08:02 PM
Having lived in Ireland for a long time, what I always found astonishing is the fact that nobody harvest all that water that falls out of the sky.
What can be easier than fitting a few clean plastic tanks on top of each other, direct the gutter drain into them, and use a small pump to pump the stuff to where you want it, including washing machine. And if you filter it a little, you can make a cup of tea that doesn't taste of chlorine, and you can stop worrying about the fluoride in the water as well...

C. Flower
08-11-2012, 08:06 PM
Having lived in Ireland for a long time, what I always found astonishing is the fact that nobody harvest all that water that falls out of the sky.
What can be easier than fitting a few clean plastic tanks on top of each other, direct the gutter drain into them, and use a small pump to pump the stuff to where you want it, including washing machine. And if you filter it a little, you can make a cup of tea that doesn't taste of chlorine, and you can stop worrying about the fluoride in the water as well...

A lot of people in Ireland have their own well, or share in a local community water supply, self built. And plenty do have rain water butts these days.

C. Flower
08-11-2012, 08:07 PM
Charging for water doesn’t need to equate to privatization. Most water utilities (unlike gas or electricity) in the US are publicly owned.

Wait until you can't pay off your debt and the IMF comes in. Then you will pay Coca Cola for water (salty, to make you drink more), and be legally barred from collecting rain water.

Baron von Biffo
08-11-2012, 09:53 PM
Welcome to the brave new world of the Programme - people who can't or won't pay water bills to have their supply cut at some times of day, or water pressure reduced so that washing machines won't work. :(

http://www.independent.ie/national-news/water-ration-plan-for-those-who-refuse-to-pay-utility-bills-3286120.html

http://www.politicalworld.org/showpost.php?p=289813&postcount=85

Dr. FIVE
08-11-2012, 10:13 PM
Charging for water doesn’t need to equate to privatization

does when the IMF are running you country

Count Bobulescu
08-11-2012, 10:48 PM
does when the IMF are running you country

I suppose if they are leaking 41% of all water, twice the international average, they deserve to be privatized.

Ogiol
08-11-2012, 10:58 PM
I suppose if they are leaking 41% of all water, twice the international average, they deserve to be privatized.

Indeed, instead of being repaired now, lets privatise them and see how that turns out:D

fluffybiscuits
08-11-2012, 11:40 PM
I suppose if they are leaking 41% of all water, twice the international average, they deserve to be privatized.

Irish Examiner carried a report that Irish Water dont have a clue at all what the leakage rate it. They wont know till they install the meters

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/households-to-face-leaking-water-pipe-charges-213221.html


It is estimated that the current national leakage rate is 41%, although Irish Water said it would have no idea what level of leakage occurred in pipes near homes until water meters are installed.

Count Bobulescu
09-11-2012, 12:30 AM
Irish Examiner carried a report that Irish Water dont have a clue at all what the leakage rate it. They wont know till they install the meters

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/households-to-face-leaking-water-pipe-charges-213221.html
Meter to house leakage is just a subset of total leakage. Mains leakage is likely much greater due to the higher volumes.

fluffybiscuits
09-11-2012, 12:38 AM
Meter to house leakage is just a subset of total leakage. Mains leakage is likely much greater due to the higher volumes.

Its all leakage to me... ;)

riposte
10-05-2014, 07:58 PM
There is no shortage of water in Ireland ...... and not likely to be for the next 10.000 years. Talking about conservation of water in ireland is pure nonsense ........ you heard that here first ..... because all the commentators and pundits are too thick to notice ....... and influenced by Politically Correct dogma that comes from a dicitorial environmental movement. These are the same guys who gave us the carbon tax ........ to prevent "global warming" ......... while America, China, Russia and India couldn't give a fook about "global warming".

Anyone stupid enough to reduce the amount water needed to flush their toilet can expect a much greater expense when their sewers get blocked up.