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View Full Version : Family Planning and Abortion in China - Policy Change an the Era of Liberalisation?



Count Bobulescu
15-07-2012, 11:52 AM
A useful english language site from China

http://www.globaltimes.cn/NEWS/tabid/99/ID/719628/Libya-wraps-up-national-congress-election-vote-counting-begins.aspx

Try Yonhap for Korean news.

Love the “Daily Quote” to the right of the photo on the hompage. For July 15,............
Criticism of forced abortion, while justified, should not turn into encouragement of violations of the population control policy.

Followed by this from the “Daily Specials” immediately underneath, China cuts fuel prices for third time in two months. Followed by Daioyo Islands can’t be bought.:)

Count Bobulescu
15-07-2012, 12:07 PM
I noticed the article in your link was dated July 7, and thought that odd, so i just clicked homepage.

C. Flower
15-07-2012, 12:08 PM
Love the “Daily Quote” to the right of the photo on the hompage. For July 15,............
Criticism of forced abortion, while justified, should not turn into encouragement of violations of the population control policy.

Followed by this from the “Daily Specials” immediately underneath, China cuts fuel prices for third time in two months. Followed by Daioyo Islands can’t be bought.:)

Quoted from this interesting story -


http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/720819.shtmlThe forced abortion scandal in Ankang, Shaanxi Province was brought to a conclusion when Feng Jianmei, the woman who had her seven-month pregnancy forcefully terminated, was awarded 70,600 yuan ($11,075) in compensation Tuesday.

Feng's experience prompted a nationwide debate on grass-roots human rights protection and the implementation of the family planning policy.

The forced late-stage abortion was, first of all, unacceptable. Grass-roots family planning commissions all over the country must learn this lesson.

The enforcement of the one-child policy should evolve at a time when the public has higher demands of human rights standards. It needs to seek a population-control method with a minimum social price. Forceful approaches will have to be abandoned.

But the necessity of population-control policy should not be negated by the past mistakes made in implementing it. The policy was based on the deliberations of several generations of demographers.

Whether the family-planning policy needs adjustment and how to realize it is a matter that is currently undergoing intense debate.

However, how to conduct the adjustment has to be based on national-level research and public opinion consultation. It cannot be decided by a few opinion leaders and media.

Criticism of forced abortion, while justified, should not turn into encouragement of violations of the population control policy, which will create additional obstacles for grass-roots family planning implementation.

Admittedly, the one-child policy is at odds with people's freedom of choice. Ideally, a family should be able to have as many children as it desires. That freedom is now limited.

But this has to be considered against China's massive population. Controlling its numbers is aimed at creating conditions for better human rights so that the current and future generations can have decent lives. In general, it is aimed at improving human rights, not the opposite.

It is easy to see China has meager resources per capita. The life of Western developed countries is appealing, but it is impossible to copy completely here. A huge population and limited resources means China needs more sense of planning in its development path. This is a reality we cannot evade.

In the past, individual rights were repeatedly sacrificed for the collective interest. Now the emphasis on individual rights often goes to extremes, putting the public's interests behind.

Forced abortions must be forbidden, but unlimited child birth shouldn't be encouraged. Both are crucial to this country.

Nothing like following news from local sources, whether its Yonhap, Global Times, the Jerusalem Post, or Fox.

C. Flower
15-07-2012, 12:12 PM
I noticed the article in your link was dated July 7, and thought that odd, so i just clicked homepage.

An article on Libya, that I had just linked to the Libyan Elections thread.

Conspiracy theorism at you, Count B ?

C. Flower
15-07-2012, 12:13 PM
Do we need a new thread for this issue ? This sticky is meant to be a list of useful international press links.

Count Bobulescu
15-07-2012, 12:16 PM
An article on Libya, that I had just linked to the Libyan Elections thread.

Conspiracy theorism at you, Count B ?
I simply wanted to see the most recent headline, nothing like keepin up with the news ya know.

C. Flower
15-07-2012, 12:27 PM
I simply wanted to see the most recent headline, nothing like keepin up with the news ya know.

I'll split is so - it should make a good thread.

C. Flower
15-07-2012, 12:39 PM
Personally I think the idea of either forced abortion or forced childbirth is horrific.

China appears to be reassessing its policy on family size. Perhaps the looming spectre of an ageing population, with its deflationary economic effects, is contributing to this.

Count Bobulescu
15-07-2012, 12:56 PM
Posted this in the Chinese bubble thread last week.


The recent case of the state forced abortion on a woman 7 months pregnant has set off another round of pieces on the one child policy. Here’s one audio and transcript.


Predictions Of Soaring Costs, Stagnating Economy

China now has about 1.3 billion people. That includes an elderly population of about 180 million, Wang says. In less than 20 years — by 2030 — that number will be 360 million, he says.
"That's going to be bigger than the population of the United States right now," he says. "It's a very scary situation."
As the population ages, health care costs are expected to soar. With couples having fewer kids, there will be far fewer workers to pay for that health care.
"I think the harm has already been done," says Wang. "So even if China stopped the one-child policy tomorrow, this new birth would not become adult labor until 20 years from now."
James Liang, an economist and chairman of Ctrip.com, the Expedia of China, published a book in April called Too Many People in China? In it, he argues that as Japan's workforce aged, innovation and entrepreneurship suffered and contributed to the country's economic stagnation. He worries the same thing will happen to China.
"The situation is actually pretty gloomy, pretty bad, pretty urgent," says Liang.
Liang fears young Chinese professionals will get trapped behind a bigger generation on the career ladder and much of the innovative energy that fires an economy will be lost.
"If China gets into this problem of aging and China is not as creative as other economies, China will definitely hit some bottleneck in terms of its economy or competitiveness," Liang says.

Baby Boom Considered Unlikely

http://www.npr.org/2012/07/05/156211106/after-a-forced-abortion-a-roaring-debate-in-china

Count Bobulescu
15-07-2012, 08:56 PM
Why China should abandon it's one child policy.


The forced abortion might be an isolated case in China. After all, the population control policy is no longer as strictly enforced in China as it was in the 1980s. The one-child policy is still in place in urban cities, but two children per couple is almost the norm in China's countryside. Theoretically, a couple can have as many children as they want as long as they have money and are willing to pay -- Ms. Feng was forced to abort her baby because she did not have RMB40,000, or $6,300, to pay the fine for having a second child. Wealthy families can even avoid the penalties by giving birth in Hong Kong or the United States. According to Hong Kong's government, in 2010 about 45 percent of the births in the former British colony were delivered by mainland Chinese women.

http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/07/why-china-should-end-its-draconian-counterproductive-one-child-policy/259814/

C. Flower
15-07-2012, 09:06 PM
Why China should abandon it's one child policy.

http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/07/why-china-should-end-its-draconian-counterproductive-one-child-policy/259814/

Should we all be having more little consumers to keep the market expanding ?


Worse, the policy is undermining China's international competitiveness. According to a leading demographer on China, by 2013, with the growth rate of net consumers exceeding the growth rate of net producers, China's demographic dividend growth rate will turn negative.

Count Bobulescu
15-07-2012, 09:21 PM
Should we all be having more little consumers to keep the market expanding ?China certainly needs them. In the 1960's New York had a major power outage, and the maternity wards were full nine months later. Yea for power outages.

bernadette
15-07-2012, 09:33 PM
Chinas abortion law is disgraceful but even worse is many of its peoples attitude to girls who are often abandoned by those parents determined to have a boy. The abortion law aids the discrimination and illtreatment of girls. Sorry if this is off topic but if the subject is being reviewed by the Chinese its one that will reccur.