PDA

View Full Version : Finally, a smoking gun connecting livestock antibiotics and superbugs



Andrew49
24-02-2012, 06:23 PM
How does the livestock industry talk about antibiotics? Well, it depends on who’s doing the talking, but they all say some version of the same thing. Take the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association; they say there is
“no conclusive scientific evidence indicating the judicious use of antibiotics in cattle herds leads to antimicrobial resistance in humans [MRSA].”

Or Ron Phillips of the Animal Health Institute (a drug-industry front group). In an interview on Grist last year, he said that before you can draw any conclusions:


… You have to look at specific bug/drug combinations and figure out what are the potential pathways for antibiotic-resistant material to transfer from animals to humans. Studies have been done, and have come to the conclusion that there is a vanishingly small level of risk.

The message is clear. Until scientists trace a particular bug from animals to humans and show precisely how it achieved resistance and moved from farm to consumer, there’s no smoking gun. Thus industry leaders’ heads can remain firmly buried in the sand.

Finally, a smoking gun, connecting livestock antibiotics and superbugs LINK (http://t.co/ujRJcXY8)

A study in the journal mBio, published by the American Society for Microbiology, shows how an antibiotic-susceptible staph germ passed from humans into pigs, where it became resistant to the antibiotics tetracycline and methicillin. And then the antibiotic-resistant staph learned to jump back into humans.


“It’s like watching the birth of a superbug,” says Lance Price of the Translational Genomics Research Institute, or TGen, in Flagstaff, Ariz.


- - - - - - - -

morticia
25-02-2012, 05:43 PM
Sadly, if we think that scientific proof is going to suddenly persuade anyone to stop feeding their cattle antibiotics, think again.

If the drugs promote weight gain and profit, they'll keep doing it and swearing blind that all scientific evidence that might affect their profit margins is dubious.

Just look at the oil industry's response to global warming. They've managed to turn it into an almost religious issue in the US

I'm afraid lifespans are likely to start contracting shortly. The pensions industry will be relieved.

fluffybiscuits
26-02-2012, 03:09 PM
Sadly, if we think that scientific proof is going to suddenly persuade anyone to stop feeding their cattle antibiotics, think again.

If the drugs promote weight gain and profit, they'll keep doing it and swearing blind that all scientific evidence that might affect their profit margins is dubious.

Just look at the oil industry's response to global warming. They've managed to turn it into an almost religious issue in the US

I'm afraid lifespans are likely to start contracting shortly. The pensions industry will be relieved.

Moritica dont know if you have encountered this but a lot of farmers innoculate cattle themselves against such bugs. From my own experience growing up in Meath certainly it was a common practice. I dont know how they got their hands on the anti biotics but certainly its something that should be looked at.

jpc
26-02-2012, 07:58 PM
The use of antibiotics on farms in Ireland is strongly regulated.
I'd say the boat has long sailed on this story to be honest though!

fluffybiscuits
28-02-2012, 10:58 PM
The use of antibiotics on farms in Ireland is strongly regulated.
I'd say the boat has long sailed on this story to be honest though!

Through officicial channels perhaps but anecdotally I would not be surprised if farmers are using them left right and centre...