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View Full Version : What to do if you get Pepper Sprayed / Tear Gassed



C. Flower
21-11-2011, 10:51 PM
In the week that's in it, I thought I'd put up some basic health and safety advice.

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/11/21/what-to-do-if-you-come-in-contact-with-pepper-spray/


http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2011/02/numb_and_coke.html

Griska
21-11-2011, 10:56 PM
I thought vinegar, not water was the way to go.:confused:

C. Flower
21-11-2011, 10:57 PM
I thought vinegar, not water was the way to go.:confused:

Vinegar, coke or lemon juice for tear gas.

A bottle of dilute vinegar being a handy thing.

C. Flower
21-11-2011, 10:58 PM
I got cayenne pepper juice in an eye once during a *cooking incident* :(

Couldn't see out of it for hours. But flushing with water did help a bit.

fluffybiscuits
22-11-2011, 02:07 PM
Loved the last bit from the ABC news site "suck on half a lemon" rofl! Seems keeping your eyes exposed to air seems to be the ideal way of getting rid of it to let the spray evaporate. Do the Gardai use tear gas?

C. Flower
22-11-2011, 03:46 PM
I can't imagine pepper spray evaporating.

Megan on Fox News says it's a food product.

Spray on flavouring could be the next big thing in cooking.

fluffybiscuits
22-11-2011, 04:03 PM
I can't imagine pepper spray evaporating.

Megan on Fox News says it's a food product.

Spray on flavouring could be the next big thing in cooking.

Sure what could be next , pizza as a vegetable..oh wait...! ;)

Captain Con O'Sullivan
22-11-2011, 04:05 PM
What to do if you get teargassed or peppersprayed? Simple. Go home and build a flamethrower.

Trow
22-11-2011, 05:29 PM
In the week that's in it, I thought I'd put up some basic health and safety advice.

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/11/21/what-to-do-if-you-come-in-contact-with-pepper-spray/


http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2011/02/numb_and_coke.html

Chance favours the prepared mind.
http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Louis_Pasteur

C. Flower
22-11-2011, 05:33 PM
Pepper spray - orange - comes from an aerosol, close up.


The Vandenberg Air Force Base in California offered these tips if pepper spray gets into your eyes:
Wash the exposed area with soap and water to remove all oils and dirt, which might entrap the irritant.
Flush the exposed area profusely with cold water three to five minutes.
Keep the washed areas exposed to fresh air to allow the irritant to evaporate.
Do not apply oil or grease medications. They could further trap the irritants.
Do not bandage the exposed areas.
Keep the area exposed to fresh air.

C. Flower
22-11-2011, 05:37 PM
Tear gas = white foggy stuff, coming out of large canisters. This advice seems not to be based on a basis of testing -


No one knows for sure. Both Coca-Cola and Pepsi are acidic, and insurgents and protesters around the world have used acids to minimize the impact of tear gas for decades. Communist Salvadoran guerrillas, for example, used lemon juice in the 1980s, while anti-globalization activists soaked bandanas in vinegar at the Free Trade Association of the Americas summit in 2001. (In terms of pH, Coke and Pepsi are similar to lemon juice, with a pH level of about 2.5 [PDF]. Other types of soda are more basic.) The practice might help prevent the irritant from entering the respiratory system. "Tear gas" isn't a gas at all, but a cloud of suspended particles that don't dissolve easily in water, and any kind of wet rag could serve as a filter. It's possible (but unproved) that an acid-soaked rag would be advantageous given the chemical properties of tear gas. Either way, the tactic has become commonplace among rabble- rousers, and a Pentagon-funded report on nonlethal weapons from 2009 noted in its chapter on tear gas that "a handkerchief soaked in lemon juice can mitigate the weapons' effects." That said, no serious medical researchers have tried to demonstrate its efficacy.
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There may also be a psychological element to the method. Inhaling pungent lemon juice, vinegar, or even onion fumes might distract protesters from the effects of the tear gas, taking their minds off of the choking haze while they run toward fresh air. Even if an acid-bandana really did eliminate the respiratory effects of tear gas, it probably wouldn't do much to prevent skin and eye irritation. In addition to its most famous ocular effect, tear gas causes uncontrollable blinking and eye pain, as well as blistering (PDF) or even burns, after heavy exposure. The only evidence that a Coca-Cola bath can stave off any of these symptoms is spotty and anecdotal.
Among doctors, there are two schools of thought on how to counteract the eye effects of tear gas exposure, and neither involves cola. Some favor blowing a fan into the patient's eyes to try to evaporate any remaining chemicals. Others go straight to irrigating the eyes with copious amounts of saline solution for 10 minutes. There's also a dispute on skin treatment. Most emergency room doctors wash off the chemical with soap and water. A minority, however, thinks water only intensifies the symptoms and prefers to let the tear gas remnants evaporate on their own. Persistent respiratory symptoms are treated with oxygen or an asthma-style inhaler.



A problem of tear gas is that people subjected to it don't know exactly what is in it. Also, the product often seems to be used after its sell-by date.

In Tahrir, people favoured bathing/cleaning eyes with vinegar, but it would be good to find some proper medical advice on this.

Baron von Biffo
22-11-2011, 05:43 PM
Pepper spray - orange - comes from an aerosol, close up.


The Vandenberg Air Force Base in California offered these tips if pepper spray gets into your eyes:
Wash the exposed area with soap and water to remove all oils and dirt, which might entrap the irritant.
Flush the exposed area profusely with cold water three to five minutes.
Keep the washed areas exposed to fresh air to allow the irritant to evaporate.
Do not apply oil or grease medications. They could further trap the irritants.
Do not bandage the exposed areas.
Keep the area exposed to fresh air.


For much of our professional protester class that constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. :)

C. Flower
22-11-2011, 05:46 PM
For much of our professional protester class that constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. :)

Well, some of them are public sector workers, you know...

5intheface
22-11-2011, 05:49 PM
For some reason, Bernadette Devlin was famously impervious to the effects of tear-gas during the civil rights riots.

She suggested,

I was smoking 30 cigarettes a day at the time, so tear gas meant nothing to me.

http://www.tate.org.uk/images/cms/thumb/19589t_w_bernadette5resize.jpg

Baron von Biffo
22-11-2011, 05:52 PM
Well, some of them are public sector workers, you know...

;)

There's protesters and protesters. The one's I'm thinking of are the professional - those who would never defile themselves with work of any sort, public or private.

C. Flower
22-11-2011, 06:02 PM
;)

There's protesters and protesters. The one's I'm thinking of are the professional - those who would never defile themselves with work of any sort, public or private.

Well, if you are going to move your goalposts to either side of a category of "people who protest full time and don't wash" your point stands. That is, if you can establish that anyone in that category actually exists.

:)

Andrew49
22-11-2011, 06:30 PM
What to do if you get teargassed or peppersprayed? Simple. Go home and build a flamethrower.

Never a simpler or truer statement.

During recruit training in the Irish Defence Forces way way way back in 1971, a platoon of us were told to get into our Bulls Wool uniforms and parade outside the QM stores for gas masks. Great stuff we said - we knew they were getting rid of the old World War One gas masks (I KIDYOUNOT) and being issued with new up to date ones.

So we got into our uniforms and paraded outside the QM stores, where we were indeed issued the new gas masks. We were then marched to the Transport Section, loaded onto a truck and driven to Mount Seskin. When we got there we were ordered to put on the gas masks and then we were marched over a hilly area. It looked quite foggy through the masks and it was quite misty and drizzly but, even so, the 'fog' was a bit strange as it appeared - though our masks to be sprouting out of the ground. It dawned on us in the platoon that the 'fog' was some kind of CS gas or its equivalent and that this was the Army's way of testing new weapons.

During a smoke-break in the proceedings our platoon took shelter against a wall of what was once a house. We took off our masks and as we were seating we attempted to wipe the sweat from our faces with the sleeves of out Bulls Wool. Needless to say we were all soon in agony from burning skin. We did get a week's ED (Excused Duties) - mostly to wash the chemicals from our skin, eyes, ears and clothes

But rather than risk us been on ED for a month our Bulls Wool uniforms, shirts, underwear, beret even were all immolated in a furnace!!!!!

C. Flower
22-11-2011, 07:09 PM
People in Cairo have died of asphyxiation in the last two days, from inhaling tear gas.
It's not long since a Palestinian woman died.

Horrible stuff to use against people who are demonstrating peacefully.

C. Flower
22-11-2011, 07:36 PM
MK II 560 CS being used in Alexandria. If anyone has an antidote the doctors there would like to know what it is.

Starfire
22-11-2011, 07:44 PM
A simple but effective gas mask can be constructed from a empty coke can, filled with charcoal and with a few holds punched in the bottom of it - the mask is completed with a plastic bag big enough to get your head into. A few wads of soft toilet paper in the bottom helps. Barbeque charcoal works well. The Starfire answer. :)

fluffybiscuits
22-11-2011, 09:16 PM
A simple but effective gas mask can be constructed from a empty coke can, filled with charcoal and with a few holds punched in the bottom of it - the mask is completed with a plastic bag big enough to get your head into. A few wads of soft toilet paper in the bottom helps. Barbeque charcoal works well. The Starfire answer. :)

The charcoal should mop up the particles but there is a standard for gas masks! Masks have to meet a certain standard as laid down by standards transposed by the EU . The NSAI should be able to tell you what sort of gas masks are acceptable for use in fighting tear gas .

Edit: just asked them

I'll probably have a few masked men breaking in thinking Im planning a revolution!

Starfire
23-11-2011, 12:42 AM
Most use activated silver treated bone charcoal , but any charcoal will do - the plastic bag is clear polythene and the can, an old bean tin - not to a standard but a quick cheap and practical solution - make sure not to tighten the neck seal to much as it can defeat the purpose. Hen! hen! hen!

C. Flower
23-11-2011, 12:53 AM
Whatever you do, don't put the plastic bag over your head. :eek:

Captain Con O'Sullivan
23-11-2011, 09:10 AM
Never a simpler or truer statement.

During recruit training in the Irish Defence Forces way way way back in 1971, a platoon of us were told to get into our Bulls Wool uniforms and parade outside the QM stores for gas masks. Great stuff we said - we knew they were getting rid of the old World War One gas masks (I KIDYOUNOT) and being issued with new up to date ones.

So we got into our uniforms and paraded outside the QM stores, where we were indeed issued the new gas masks. We were then marched to the Transport Section, loaded onto a truck and driven to Mount Seskin. When we got there we were ordered to put on the gas masks and then we were marched over a hilly area. It looked quite foggy through the masks and it was quite misty and drizzly but, even so, the 'fog' was a bit strange as it appeared - though our masks to be sprouting out of the ground. It dawned on us in the platoon that the 'fog' was some kind of CS gas or its equivalent and that this was the Army's way of testing new weapons.

During a smoke-break in the proceedings our platoon took shelter against a wall of what was once a house. We took off our masks and as we were seating we attempted to wipe the sweat from our faces with the sleeves of out Bulls Wool. Needless to say we were all soon in agony from burning skin. We did get a week's ED (Excused Duties) - mostly to wash the chemicals from our skin, eyes, ears and clothes

But rather than risk us been on ED for a month our Bulls Wool uniforms, shirts, underwear, beret even were all immolated in a furnace!!!!!

The Reserves was like a museum for antique equipment ... stint I had we had a 303 Lee Enfield rifle WWII vintage and that was in the early 80's. Still have trouble saying 'upper sling swivel' without converting it to 'upper swing slivel'.

I managed to jam the bolt and had a Sergeant snort and snatch it off me to show me how to sort it. Cue one huffing and puffing Sergeant and five minutes of straining and heaving at the damn thing later and the rifle was officially retired.

I still maintain that my best ever military stroke was jamming that rifle irrevocably. Bloody thing would have been likely to explode in someone's face if any attempt had been made to use it in anger.